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guestfs(3)			      Virtualization Support			       guestfs(3)

NAME
       guestfs - Library for accessing and modifying virtual machine images

SYNOPSIS
	#include <guestfs.h>

	guestfs_h *g = guestfs_create ();
	guestfs_add_drive (g, "guest.img");
	guestfs_launch (g);
	guestfs_mount (g, "/dev/sda1", "/");
	guestfs_touch (g, "/hello");
	guestfs_umount (g, "/");
	guestfs_shutdown (g);
	guestfs_close (g);

	cc prog.c -o prog -lguestfs
       or:
	cc prog.c -o prog `pkg-config libguestfs --cflags --libs`

DESCRIPTION
       Libguestfs is a library for accessing and modifying disk images and virtual machines.
       This manual page documents the C API.

       If you are looking for an introduction to libguestfs, see the web site:
       http://libguestfs.org/

       Each virt tool has its own man page (for a full list, go to "SEE ALSO" at the end of this
       file).

       The libguestfs FAQ contains many useful answers: guestfs-faq(1).

       For examples of using the API from C, see guestfs-examples(3).  For examples in other
       languages, see "USING LIBGUESTFS WITH OTHER PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES" below.

       For tips and recipes, see guestfs-recipes(1).

       If you are having performance problems, read guestfs-performance(1).  To help test
       libguestfs, read libguestfs-test-tool(1) and guestfs-testing(1).

API OVERVIEW
       This section provides a gentler overview of the libguestfs API.	We also try to group API
       calls together, where that may not be obvious from reading about the individual calls in
       the main section of this manual.

   HANDLES
       Before you can use libguestfs calls, you have to create a handle.  Then you must add at
       least one disk image to the handle, followed by launching the handle, then performing
       whatever operations you want, and finally closing the handle.  By convention we use the
       single letter "g" for the name of the handle variable, although of course you can use any
       name you want.

       The general structure of all libguestfs-using programs looks like this:

	guestfs_h *g = guestfs_create ();

	/* Call guestfs_add_drive additional times if there are
	 * multiple disk images.
	 */
	guestfs_add_drive (g, "guest.img");

	/* Most manipulation calls won't work until you've launched
	 * the handle 'g'.  You have to do this _after_ adding drives
	 * and _before_ other commands.
	 */
	guestfs_launch (g);

	/* Either: examine what partitions, LVs etc are available: */
	char **partitions = guestfs_list_partitions (g);
	char **logvols = guestfs_lvs (g);

	/* Or: ask libguestfs to find filesystems for you: */
	char **filesystems = guestfs_list_filesystems (g);

	/* Or: use inspection (see INSPECTION section below). */

	/* To access a filesystem in the image, you must mount it. */
	guestfs_mount (g, "/dev/sda1", "/");

	/* Now you can perform filesystem actions on the guest
	 * disk image.
	 */
	guestfs_touch (g, "/hello");

	/* Synchronize the disk.  This is the opposite of guestfs_launch. */
	guestfs_shutdown (g);

	/* Close and free the handle 'g'. */
	guestfs_close (g);

       The code above doesn't include any error checking.  In real code you should check return
       values carefully for errors.  In general all functions that return integers return "-1" on
       error, and all functions that return pointers return "NULL" on error.  See section "ERROR
       HANDLING" below for how to handle errors, and consult the documentation for each function
       call below to see precisely how they return error indications.  See guestfs-examples(3)
       for fully worked examples.

   DISK IMAGES
       The image filename ("guest.img" in the example above) could be a disk image from a virtual
       machine, a dd(1) copy of a physical hard disk, an actual block device, or simply an empty
       file of zeroes that you have created through posix_fallocate(3).  Libguestfs lets you do
       useful things to all of these.

       The call you should use in modern code for adding drives is "guestfs_add_drive_opts".  To
       add a disk image, allowing writes, and specifying that the format is raw, do:

	guestfs_add_drive_opts (g, filename,
				GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_FORMAT, "raw",
				-1);

       You can add a disk read-only using:

	guestfs_add_drive_opts (g, filename,
				GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_FORMAT, "raw",
				GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_READONLY, 1,
				-1);

       or by calling the older function "guestfs_add_drive_ro".  If you use the readonly flag,
       libguestfs won't modify the file.  (See also "DISK IMAGE FORMATS" below).

       Be extremely cautious if the disk image is in use, eg. if it is being used by a virtual
       machine.  Adding it read-write will almost certainly cause disk corruption, but adding it
       read-only is safe.

       You should usually add at least one disk image, and you may add multiple disk images.  If
       adding multiple disk images, they usually have to be "related", ie. from the same guest.
       In the API, the disk images are usually referred to as "/dev/sda" (for the first one you
       added), "/dev/sdb" (for the second one you added), etc.

       Once "guestfs_launch" has been called you cannot add any more images.  You can call
       "guestfs_list_devices" to get a list of the device names, in the order that you added
       them.  See also "BLOCK DEVICE NAMING" below.

       There are slightly different rules when hotplugging disks (in libguestfs >= 1.20).  See
       "HOTPLUGGING" below.

   MOUNTING
       Before you can read or write files, create directories and so on in a disk image that
       contains filesystems, you have to mount those filesystems using "guestfs_mount" or
       "guestfs_mount_ro".  If you already know that a disk image contains (for example) one
       partition with a filesystem on that partition, then you can mount it directly:

	guestfs_mount (g, "/dev/sda1", "/");

       where "/dev/sda1" means literally the first partition (1) of the first disk image that we
       added ("/dev/sda").  If the disk contains Linux LVM2 logical volumes you could refer to
       those instead (eg. "/dev/VG/LV").  Note that these are libguestfs virtual devices, and are
       nothing to do with host devices.

       If you are given a disk image and you don't know what it contains then you have to find
       out.  Libguestfs can do that too: use "guestfs_list_partitions" and "guestfs_lvs" to list
       possible partitions and LVs, and either try mounting each to see what is mountable, or
       else examine them with "guestfs_vfs_type" or "guestfs_file".  To list just filesystems,
       use "guestfs_list_filesystems".

       Libguestfs also has a set of APIs for inspection of unknown disk images (see "INSPECTION"
       below).	You might also want to look at higher level programs built on top of libguestfs,
       in particular virt-inspector(1).

       To mount a filesystem read-only, use "guestfs_mount_ro".  There are several other
       variations of the "guestfs_mount_*" call.

   FILESYSTEM ACCESS AND MODIFICATION
       The majority of the libguestfs API consists of fairly low-level calls for accessing and
       modifying the files, directories, symlinks etc on mounted filesystems.  There are over a
       hundred such calls which you can find listed in detail below in this man page, and we
       don't even pretend to cover them all in this overview.

       Specify filenames as full paths, starting with "/" and including the mount point.

       For example, if you mounted a filesystem at "/" and you want to read the file called
       "etc/passwd" then you could do:

	char *data = guestfs_cat (g, "/etc/passwd");

       This would return "data" as a newly allocated buffer containing the full content of that
       file (with some conditions: see also "DOWNLOADING" below), or "NULL" if there was an
       error.

       As another example, to create a top-level directory on that filesystem called "var" you
       would do:

	guestfs_mkdir (g, "/var");

       To create a symlink you could do:

	guestfs_ln_s (g, "/etc/init.d/portmap",
		      "/etc/rc3.d/S30portmap");

       Libguestfs will reject attempts to use relative paths and there is no concept of a current
       working directory.

       Libguestfs can return errors in many situations: for example if the filesystem isn't
       writable, or if a file or directory that you requested doesn't exist.  If you are using
       the C API (documented here) you have to check for those error conditions after each call.
       (Other language bindings turn these errors into exceptions).

       File writes are affected by the per-handle umask, set by calling "guestfs_umask" and
       defaulting to 022.  See "UMASK".

       Since libguestfs 1.18, it is possible to mount the libguestfs filesystem on a local
       directory, subject to some restrictions.  See "MOUNT LOCAL" below.

   PARTITIONING
       Libguestfs contains API calls to read, create and modify partition tables on disk images.

       In the common case where you want to create a single partition covering the whole disk,
       you should use the "guestfs_part_disk" call:

	const char *parttype = "mbr";
	if (disk_is_larger_than_2TB)
	  parttype = "gpt";
	guestfs_part_disk (g, "/dev/sda", parttype);

       Obviously this effectively wipes anything that was on that disk image before.

   LVM2
       Libguestfs provides access to a large part of the LVM2 API, such as "guestfs_lvcreate" and
       "guestfs_vgremove".  It won't make much sense unless you familiarize yourself with the
       concepts of physical volumes, volume groups and logical volumes.

       This author strongly recommends reading the LVM HOWTO, online at
       http://tldp.org/HOWTO/LVM-HOWTO/.

   DOWNLOADING
       Use "guestfs_cat" to download small, text only files.  This call cannot handle files
       containing any ASCII NUL ("\0") characters.  However the API is very simple to use.

       "guestfs_read_file" can be used to read files which contain arbitrary 8 bit data, since it
       returns a (pointer, size) pair.

       "guestfs_download" can be used to download any file, with no limits on content or size.

       To download multiple files, see "guestfs_tar_out" and "guestfs_tgz_out".

   UPLOADING
       To write a small file with fixed content, use "guestfs_write".  To create a file of all
       zeroes, use "guestfs_truncate_size" (sparse) or "guestfs_fallocate64" (with all disk
       blocks allocated).  There are a variety of other functions for creating test files, for
       example "guestfs_fill" and "guestfs_fill_pattern".

       To upload a single file, use "guestfs_upload".  This call has no limits on file content or
       size.

       To upload multiple files, see "guestfs_tar_in" and "guestfs_tgz_in".

       However the fastest way to upload large numbers of arbitrary files is to turn them into a
       squashfs or CD ISO (see mksquashfs(8) and mkisofs(8)), then attach this using
       "guestfs_add_drive_ro".	If you add the drive in a predictable way (eg. adding it last
       after all other drives) then you can get the device name from "guestfs_list_devices" and
       mount it directly using "guestfs_mount_ro".  Note that squashfs images are sometimes non-
       portable between kernel versions, and they don't support labels or UUIDs.  If you want to
       pre-build an image or you need to mount it using a label or UUID, use an ISO image
       instead.

   COPYING
       There are various different commands for copying between files and devices and in and out
       of the guest filesystem.  These are summarised in the table below.

       file to file
	   Use "guestfs_cp" to copy a single file, or "guestfs_cp_a" to copy directories
	   recursively.

	   To copy part of a file (offset and size) use "guestfs_copy_file_to_file".

       file to device
       device to file
       device to device
	   Use "guestfs_copy_file_to_device", "guestfs_copy_device_to_file", or
	   "guestfs_copy_device_to_device".

	   Example: duplicate the contents of an LV:

	    guestfs_copy_device_to_device (g,
		    "/dev/VG/Original", "/dev/VG/Copy",
		    /* -1 marks the end of the list of optional parameters */
		    -1);

	   The destination ("/dev/VG/Copy") must be at least as large as the source
	   ("/dev/VG/Original").  To copy less than the whole source device, use the optional
	   "size" parameter:

	    guestfs_copy_device_to_device (g,
		    "/dev/VG/Original", "/dev/VG/Copy",
		    GUESTFS_COPY_DEVICE_TO_DEVICE_SIZE, 10000,
		    -1);

       file on the host to file or device
	   Use "guestfs_upload".  See "UPLOADING" above.

       file or device to file on the host
	   Use "guestfs_download".  See "DOWNLOADING" above.

   UPLOADING AND DOWNLOADING TO PIPES AND FILE DESCRIPTORS
       Calls like "guestfs_upload", "guestfs_download", "guestfs_tar_in", "guestfs_tar_out" etc
       appear to only take filenames as arguments, so it appears you can only upload and download
       to files.  However many Un*x-like hosts let you use the special device files "/dev/stdin",
       "/dev/stdout", "/dev/stderr" and "/dev/fd/N" to read and write from stdin, stdout, stderr,
       and arbitrary file descriptor N.

       For example, virt-cat(1) writes its output to stdout by doing:

	guestfs_download (g, filename, "/dev/stdout");

       and you can write tar output to a file descriptor "fd" by doing:

	char devfd[64];
	snprintf (devfd, sizeof devfd, "/dev/fd/%d", fd);
	guestfs_tar_out (g, "/", devfd);

   LISTING FILES
       "guestfs_ll" is just designed for humans to read (mainly when using the
       guestfish(1)-equivalent command "ll").

       "guestfs_ls" is a quick way to get a list of files in a directory from programs, as a flat
       list of strings.

       "guestfs_readdir" is a programmatic way to get a list of files in a directory, plus
       additional information about each one.  It is more equivalent to using the readdir(3) call
       on a local filesystem.

       "guestfs_find" and "guestfs_find0" can be used to recursively list files.

   RUNNING COMMANDS
       Although libguestfs is primarily an API for manipulating files inside guest images, we
       also provide some limited facilities for running commands inside guests.

       There are many limitations to this:

       o   The kernel version that the command runs under will be different from what it expects.

       o   If the command needs to communicate with daemons, then most likely they won't be
	   running.

       o   The command will be running in limited memory.

       o   The network may not be available unless you enable it (see "guestfs_set_network").

       o   Only supports Linux guests (not Windows, BSD, etc).

       o   Architecture limitations (eg. won't work for a PPC guest on an X86 host).

       o   For SELinux guests, you may need to enable SELinux and load policy first.  See
	   "SELINUX" in this manpage.

       o   Security: It is not safe to run commands from untrusted, possibly malicious guests.
	   These commands may attempt to exploit your program by sending unexpected output.  They
	   could also try to exploit the Linux kernel or qemu provided by the libguestfs
	   appliance.  They could use the network provided by the libguestfs appliance to bypass
	   ordinary network partitions and firewalls.  They could use the elevated privileges or
	   different SELinux context of your program to their advantage.

	   A secure alternative is to use libguestfs to install a "firstboot" script (a script
	   which runs when the guest next boots normally), and to have this script run the
	   commands you want in the normal context of the running guest, network security and so
	   on.	For information about other security issues, see "SECURITY".

       The two main API calls to run commands are "guestfs_command" and "guestfs_sh" (there are
       also variations).

       The difference is that "guestfs_sh" runs commands using the shell, so any shell globs,
       redirections, etc will work.

   CONFIGURATION FILES
       To read and write configuration files in Linux guest filesystems, we strongly recommend
       using Augeas.  For example, Augeas understands how to read and write, say, a Linux shadow
       password file or X.org configuration file, and so avoids you having to write that code.

       The main Augeas calls are bound through the "guestfs_aug_*" APIs.  We don't document
       Augeas itself here because there is excellent documentation on the http://augeas.net/
       website.

       If you don't want to use Augeas (you fool!) then try calling "guestfs_read_lines" to get
       the file as a list of lines which you can iterate over.

   SELINUX
       We support SELinux guests.  To ensure that labeling happens correctly in SELinux guests,
       you need to enable SELinux and load the guest's policy:

       1.  Before launching, do:

	    guestfs_set_selinux (g, 1);

       2.  After mounting the guest's filesystem(s), load the policy.  This is best done by
	   running the load_policy(8) command in the guest itself:

	    guestfs_sh (g, "/usr/sbin/load_policy");

	   (Older versions of "load_policy" require you to specify the name of the policy file).

       3.  Optionally, set the security context for the API.  The correct security context to use
	   can only be known by inspecting the guest.  As an example:

	    guestfs_setcon (g, "unconfined_u:unconfined_r:unconfined_t:s0");

       This will work for running commands and editing existing files.

       When new files are created, you may need to label them explicitly, for example by running
       the external command "restorecon pathname".

   UMASK
       Certain calls are affected by the current file mode creation mask (the "umask").  In
       particular ones which create files or directories, such as "guestfs_touch",
       "guestfs_mknod" or "guestfs_mkdir".  This affects either the default mode that the file is
       created with or modifies the mode that you supply.

       The default umask is 022, so files are created with modes such as 0644 and directories
       with 0755.

       There are two ways to avoid being affected by umask.  Either set umask to 0 (call
       "guestfs_umask (g, 0)" early after launching).  Or call "guestfs_chmod" after creating
       each file or directory.

       For more information about umask, see umask(2).

   LABELS AND UUIDS
       Many filesystems, devices and logical volumes support either labels (short strings like
       "BOOT" which might not be unique) and/or UUIDs (globally unique IDs).

       For filesystems, use "guestfs_vfs_label" or "guestfs_vfs_uuid" to read the label or UUID.
       Some filesystems let you call "guestfs_set_label" or "guestfs_set_uuid" to change the
       label or UUID.

       You can locate a filesystem by its label or UUID using "guestfs_findfs_label" or
       "guestfs_findfs_uuid".

       For LVM2 (which supports only UUIDs), there is a rich set of APIs for fetching UUIDs,
       fetching UUIDs of the contained objects, and changing UUIDs.  See: "guestfs_lvuuid",
       "guestfs_vguuid", "guestfs_pvuuid", "guestfs_vglvuuids", "guestfs_vgpvuuids",
       "guestfs_vgchange_uuid", "guestfs_vgchange_uuid_all", "guestfs_pvchange_uuid",
       "guestfs_pvchange_uuid_all".

       Note when cloning a filesystem, device or whole guest, it is a good idea to set new
       randomly generated UUIDs on the copy.

   ENCRYPTED DISKS
       Libguestfs allows you to access Linux guests which have been encrypted using whole disk
       encryption that conforms to the Linux Unified Key Setup (LUKS) standard.  This includes
       nearly all whole disk encryption systems used by modern Linux guests.

       Use "guestfs_vfs_type" to identify LUKS-encrypted block devices (it returns the string
       "crypto_LUKS").

       Then open these devices by calling "guestfs_luks_open".	Obviously you will require the
       passphrase!

       Opening a LUKS device creates a new device mapper device called "/dev/mapper/mapname"
       (where "mapname" is the string you supply to "guestfs_luks_open").  Reads and writes to
       this mapper device are decrypted from and encrypted to the underlying block device
       respectively.

       LVM volume groups on the device can be made visible by calling "guestfs_vgscan" followed
       by "guestfs_vg_activate_all".  The logical volume(s) can now be mounted in the usual way.

       Use the reverse process to close a LUKS device.	Unmount any logical volumes on it,
       deactivate the volume groups by caling "guestfs_vg_activate (g, 0, ["/dev/VG"])".  Then
       close the mapper device by calling "guestfs_luks_close" on the "/dev/mapper/mapname"
       device (not the underlying encrypted block device).

   MOUNT LOCAL
       In libguestfs >= 1.18, it is possible to mount the libguestfs filesystem on a local
       directory and access it using ordinary POSIX calls and programs.

       Availability of this is subject to a number of restrictions: it requires FUSE (the
       Filesystem in USErspace), and libfuse must also have been available when libguestfs was
       compiled.  FUSE may require that a kernel module is loaded, and it may be necessary to add
       the current user to a special "fuse" group.  See the documentation for your distribution
       and http://fuse.sf.net for further information.

       The call to mount the libguestfs filesystem on a local directory is "guestfs_mount_local"
       (q.v.) followed by "guestfs_mount_local_run".  The latter does not return until you
       unmount the filesystem.	The reason is that the call enters the FUSE main loop and
       processes kernel requests, turning them into libguestfs calls.  An alternative design
       would have been to create a background thread to do this, but libguestfs doesn't require
       pthreads.  This way is also more flexible: for example the user can create another thread
       for "guestfs_mount_local_run".

       "guestfs_mount_local" needs a certain amount of time to set up the mountpoint.  The
       mountpoint is not ready to use until the call returns.  At this point, accesses to the
       filesystem will block until the main loop is entered (ie. "guestfs_mount_local_run").  So
       if you need to start another process to access the filesystem, put the fork between
       "guestfs_mount_local" and "guestfs_mount_local_run".

       MOUNT LOCAL COMPATIBILITY

       Since local mounting was only added in libguestfs 1.18, and may not be available even in
       these builds, you should consider writing code so that it doesn't depend on this feature,
       and can fall back to using libguestfs file system calls.

       If libguestfs was compiled without support for "guestfs_mount_local" then calling it will
       return an error with errno set to "ENOTSUP" (see "guestfs_last_errno").

       MOUNT LOCAL PERFORMANCE

       Libguestfs on top of FUSE performs quite poorly.  For best performance do not use it.  Use
       ordinary libguestfs filesystem calls, upload, download etc. instead.

   HOTPLUGGING
       In libguestfs >= 1.20, you may add drives and remove after calling "guestfs_launch".
       There are some restrictions, see below.	This is called hotplugging.

       Only a subset of the backends support hotplugging (currently only the libvirt backend has
       support).  It also requires that you use libvirt >= 0.10.3 and qemu >= 1.2.

       To hot-add a disk, simply call "guestfs_add_drive_opts" after "guestfs_launch".	It is
       mandatory to specify the "label" parameter so that the newly added disk has a predictable
       name.  For example:

	if (guestfs_launch (g) == -1)
	  error ("launch failed");

	if (guestfs_add_drive_opts (g, filename,
				    GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_LABEL, "newdisk",
				    -1) == -1)
	  error ("hot-add of disk failed");

	if (guestfs_part_disk ("/dev/disk/guestfs/newdisk", "mbr") == -1)
	  error ("partitioning of hot-added disk failed");

       To hot-remove a disk, call "guestfs_remove_drive".  You can call this before or after
       "guestfs_launch".  You can only remove disks that were previously added with a label.

       Backends that support hotplugging do not require that you add >= 1 disk before calling
       launch.	When hotplugging is supported you don't need to add any disks.

   REMOTE STORAGE
       NETWORK BLOCK DEVICE

       Libguestfs can access Network Block Device (NBD) disks remotely.

       To do this, set the optional "protocol" and "server" parameters of
       "guestfs_add_drive_opts" like this:

	char **server = { "nbd.example.org:3000", NULL };
	guestfs_add_drive_opts (g, "" /* export name - see below */,
				GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_FORMAT, "raw",
				GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_PROTOCOL, "nbd",
				GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_SERVER, server,
				-1);

       Notes:

       o   "server" is in fact a list of servers.  For NBD you must always supply a list with a
	   single element.  (Other remote protocols require zero or more than one server, hence
	   the requirement for this parameter to be a list).

       o   The "server" string is documented in "guestfs_add_drive_opts".  To connect to a local
	   qemu-nbd instance over a Unix domain socket, use "unix:/path/to/socket".

       o   The "filename" parameter is the NBD export name.  Use an empty string to mean the
	   default export.  Many NBD servers, including qemu-nbd, do not support export names.

       o   If using qemu-nbd as your server, you should always specify the "-t" option.  The
	   reason is that libguestfs may open several connections to the server.

       o   The libvirt backend requires that you set the "format" parameter of
	   "guestfs_add_drive_opts" accurately when you use writable NBD disks.

       o   The libvirt backend has a bug that stops Unix domain socket connections from working:
	   https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=922888

       o   The direct backend does not support readonly connections because of a bug in qemu:
	   https://bugs.launchpad.net/qemu/+bug/1155677

   INSPECTION
       Libguestfs has APIs for inspecting an unknown disk image to find out if it contains
       operating systems, an install CD or a live CD.

       Add all disks belonging to the unknown virtual machine and call "guestfs_launch" in the
       usual way.

       Then call "guestfs_inspect_os".	This function uses other libguestfs calls and certain
       heuristics, and returns a list of operating systems that were found.  An empty list means
       none were found.  A single element is the root filesystem of the operating system.  For
       dual- or multi-boot guests, multiple roots can be returned, each one corresponding to a
       separate operating system.  (Multi-boot virtual machines are extremely rare in the world
       of virtualization, but since this scenario can happen, we have built libguestfs to deal
       with it.)

       For each root, you can then call various "guestfs_inspect_get_*" functions to get
       additional details about that operating system.	For example, call
       "guestfs_inspect_get_type" to return the string "windows" or "linux" for Windows and
       Linux-based operating systems respectively.

       Un*x-like and Linux-based operating systems usually consist of several filesystems which
       are mounted at boot time (for example, a separate boot partition mounted on "/boot").  The
       inspection rules are able to detect how filesystems correspond to mount points.	Call
       "guestfs_inspect_get_mountpoints" to get this mapping.  It might return a hash table like
       this example:

	/boot => /dev/sda1
	/     => /dev/vg_guest/lv_root
	/usr  => /dev/vg_guest/lv_usr

       The caller can then make calls to "guestfs_mount" to mount the filesystems as suggested.

       Be careful to mount filesystems in the right order (eg. "/" before "/usr").  Sorting the
       keys of the hash by length, shortest first, should work.

       Inspection currently only works for some common operating systems.  Contributors are
       welcome to send patches for other operating systems that we currently cannot detect.

       Encrypted disks must be opened before inspection.  See "ENCRYPTED DISKS" for more details.
       The "guestfs_inspect_os" function just ignores any encrypted devices.

       A note on the implementation: The call "guestfs_inspect_os" performs inspection and caches
       the results in the guest handle.  Subsequent calls to "guestfs_inspect_get_*" return this
       cached information, but do not re-read the disks.  If you change the content of the guest
       disks, you can redo inspection by calling "guestfs_inspect_os" again.
       ("guestfs_inspect_list_applications2" works a little differently from the other calls and
       does read the disks.  See documentation for that function for details).

       INSPECTING INSTALL DISKS

       Libguestfs (since 1.9.4) can detect some install disks, install CDs, live CDs and more.

       Call "guestfs_inspect_get_format" to return the format of the operating system, which
       currently can be "installed" (a regular operating system) or "installer" (some sort of
       install disk).

       Further information is available about the operating system that can be installed using
       the regular inspection APIs like "guestfs_inspect_get_product_name",
       "guestfs_inspect_get_major_version" etc.

       Some additional information specific to installer disks is also available from the
       "guestfs_inspect_is_live", "guestfs_inspect_is_netinst" and "guestfs_inspect_is_multipart"
       calls.

   SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR WINDOWS GUESTS
       Libguestfs can mount NTFS partitions.  It does this using the http://www.ntfs-3g.org/
       driver.

       DRIVE LETTERS AND PATHS

       DOS and Windows still use drive letters, and the filesystems are always treated as case
       insensitive by Windows itself, and therefore you might find a Windows configuration file
       referring to a path like "c:\windows\system32".	When the filesystem is mounted in
       libguestfs, that directory might be referred to as "/WINDOWS/System32".

       Drive letter mappings can be found using inspection (see "INSPECTION" and
       "guestfs_inspect_get_drive_mappings")

       Dealing with separator characters (backslash vs forward slash) is outside the scope of
       libguestfs, but usually a simple character replacement will work.

       To resolve the case insensitivity of paths, call "guestfs_case_sensitive_path".

       LONG FILENAMES ON NTFS

       NTFS supports filenames up to 255 characters long.  "Character" means a 2 byte UTF-16
       codepoint which can encode the most common Unicode codepoints.

       Most Linux filesystems support filenames up to 255 bytes.  This means you may get an
       error:

	File name too long

       when you copy a file from NTFS to a Linux filesystem if the name, when reencoded as UTF-8,
       would exceed 255 bytes in length.

       This will most often happen when using non-ASCII names that are longer than ~127
       characters (eg. Greek, Cyrillic) or longer than ~85 characters (Asian languages).

       A workaround is not to try to store such long filenames on Linux native filesystems.
       Since the tar(1) format can store unlimited length filenames, keep the files in a tarball.

       ACCESSING THE WINDOWS REGISTRY

       Libguestfs also provides some help for decoding Windows Registry "hive" files, through a
       separate C library called hivex(3).

       Before libguestfs 1.19.35 you had to download the hive file, operate on it locally using
       hivex, and upload it again.  Since this version, we have included the major hivex APIs
       directly in the libguestfs API (see "guestfs_hivex_open").  This means that if you have
       opened a Windows guest, you can read and write the registry directly.

       See also virt-win-reg(1).

       SYMLINKS ON NTFS-3G FILESYSTEMS

       Ntfs-3g tries to rewrite "Junction Points" and NTFS "symbolic links" to provide something
       which looks like a Linux symlink.  The way it tries to do the rewriting is described here:

       http://www.tuxera.com/community/ntfs-3g-advanced/junction-points-and-symbolic-links/

       The essential problem is that ntfs-3g simply does not have enough information to do a
       correct job.  NTFS links can contain drive letters and references to external device GUIDs
       that ntfs-3g has no way of resolving.  It is almost certainly the case that libguestfs
       callers should ignore what ntfs-3g does (ie. don't use "guestfs_readlink" on NTFS
       volumes).

       Instead if you encounter a symbolic link on an ntfs-3g filesystem, use "guestfs_lgetxattr"
       to read the "system.ntfs_reparse_data" extended attribute, and read the raw reparse data
       from that (you can find the format documented in various places around the web).

       EXTENDED ATTRIBUTES ON NTFS-3G FILESYSTEMS

       There are other useful extended attributes that can be read from ntfs-3g filesystems
       (using "guestfs_getxattr").  See:

       http://www.tuxera.com/community/ntfs-3g-advanced/extended-attributes/

       WINDOWS HIBERNATION AND WINDOWS 8 FAST STARTUP

       Windows guests which have been hibernated (instead of fully shut down) cannot be mounted.
       This is a limitation of ntfs-3g.  You will see an error like this:

	The disk contains an unclean file system (0, 0).
	Metadata kept in Windows cache, refused to mount.
	Failed to mount '/dev/sda2': Operation not permitted
	The NTFS partition is in an unsafe state. Please resume
	and shutdown Windows fully (no hibernation or fast
	restarting), or mount the volume read-only with the
	'ro' mount option.

       In Windows 8, the shutdown button does not shut down the guest at all.  Instead it usually
       hibernates the guest.  This is known as "fast startup".

       Some suggested workarounds are:

       o   Mount read-only (eg. "guestfs_mount_ro").

       o   On Windows 8, turn off fast startup.  It is in the Control Panel -> Power Options ->
	   Choose what the power buttons do -> Change settings that are currently unavailable ->
	   Turn on fast startup.

       o   On Windows 7 and earlier, shut the guest off properly instead of hibernating it.

   RESIZE2FS ERRORS
       The "guestfs_resize2fs", "guestfs_resize2fs_size" and "guestfs_resize2fs_M" calls are used
       to resize ext2/3/4 filesystems.

       The underlying program (resize2fs(8)) requires that the filesystem is clean and recently
       fsck'd before you can resize it.  Also, if the resize operation fails for some reason,
       then you had to call fsck the filesystem again to fix it.

       In libguestfs "lt" 1.17.14, you usually had to call "guestfs_e2fsck_f" before the resize.
       However, in "ge" 1.17.14, e2fsck(8) is called automatically before the resize, so you no
       longer need to do this.

       The resize2fs(8) program can still fail, in which case it prints an error message similar
       to:

	Please run 'e2fsck -fy <device>' to fix the filesystem
	after the aborted resize operation.

       You can do this by calling "guestfs_e2fsck" with the "forceall" option.	However in the
       context of disk images, it is usually better to avoid this situation, eg. by rolling back
       to an earlier snapshot, or by copying and resizing and on failure going back to the
       original.

   USING LIBGUESTFS WITH OTHER PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES
       Although we don't want to discourage you from using the C API, we will mention here that
       the same API is also available in other languages.

       The API is broadly identical in all supported languages.  This means that the C call
       "guestfs_add_drive_ro(g,file)" is "$g->add_drive_ro($file)" in Perl,
       "g.add_drive_ro(file)" in Python, and "g#add_drive_ro file" in OCaml.  In other words, a
       straightforward, predictable isomorphism between each language.

       Error messages are automatically transformed into exceptions if the language supports it.

       We don't try to "object orientify" parts of the API in OO languages, although contributors
       are welcome to write higher level APIs above what we provide in their favourite languages
       if they wish.

       C++ You can use the guestfs.h header file from C++ programs.  The C++ API is identical to
	   the C API.  C++ classes and exceptions are not used.

       C#  The C# bindings are highly experimental.  Please read the warnings at the top of
	   "csharp/Libguestfs.cs".

       Erlang
	   See guestfs-erlang(3).

       GObject
	   Experimental GObject bindings (with GObject Introspection support) are available.  See
	   the "gobject" directory in the source.

       Haskell
	   This language binding is working but incomplete:

	   o   Functions with optional arguments are not bound.  Implementing optional arguments
	       in Haskell seems to be very complex.

	   o   Events are not bound.

	   o   Functions with the following return types are not bound:

	       o   Any function returning a struct.

	       o   Any function returning a list of structs.

	       o   A few functions that return fixed length buffers (specifically ones declared
		   "RBufferOut" in the generator).

	       o   A tiny number of obscure functions that return constant strings (specifically
		   ones declared "RConstOptString" in the generator).

       Java
	   Full documentation is contained in the Javadoc which is distributed with libguestfs.
	   For examples, see guestfs-java(3).

       Lua See guestfs-lua(3).

       OCaml
	   See guestfs-ocaml(3).

       Perl
	   See guestfs-perl(3) and Sys::Guestfs(3).

       PHP For documentation see "README-PHP" supplied with libguestfs sources or in the php-
	   libguestfs package for your distribution.

	   The PHP binding only works correctly on 64 bit machines.

       Python
	   See guestfs-python(3).

       Ruby
	   See guestfs-ruby(3).

	   For JRuby, use the Java bindings.

       shell scripts
	   See guestfish(1).

   LIBGUESTFS GOTCHAS
       http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gotcha_(programming): "A feature of a system [...] that works
       in the way it is documented but is counterintuitive and almost invites mistakes."

       Since we developed libguestfs and the associated tools, there are several things we would
       have designed differently, but are now stuck with for backwards compatibility or other
       reasons.  If there is ever a libguestfs 2.0 release, you can expect these to change.
       Beware of them.

       Read-only should be the default.
	   In guestfish(3), --ro should be the default, and you should have to specify --rw if
	   you want to make changes to the image.

	   This would reduce the potential to corrupt live VM images.

	   Note that many filesystems change the disk when you just mount and unmount, even if
	   you didn't perform any writes.  You need to use "guestfs_add_drive_ro" to guarantee
	   that the disk is not changed.

       guestfish command line is hard to use.
	   "guestfish disk.img" doesn't do what people expect (open "disk.img" for examination).
	   It tries to run a guestfish command "disk.img" which doesn't exist, so it fails.  In
	   earlier versions of guestfish the error message was also unintuitive, but we have
	   corrected this since.  Like the Bourne shell, we should have used "guestfish -c
	   command" to run commands.

       guestfish megabyte modifiers don't work right on all commands
	   In recent guestfish you can use "1M" to mean 1 megabyte (and similarly for other
	   modifiers).	What guestfish actually does is to multiply the number part by the
	   modifier part and pass the result to the C API.  However this doesn't work for a few
	   APIs which aren't expecting bytes, but are already expecting some other unit (eg.
	   megabytes).

	   The most common is "guestfs_lvcreate".  The guestfish command:

	    lvcreate LV VG 100M

	   does not do what you might expect.  Instead because "guestfs_lvcreate" is already
	   expecting megabytes, this tries to create a 100 terabyte (100 megabytes * megabytes)
	   logical volume.  The error message you get from this is also a little obscure.

	   This could be fixed in the generator by specially marking parameters and return values
	   which take bytes or other units.

       Ambiguity between devices and paths
	   There is a subtle ambiguity in the API between a device name (eg. "/dev/sdb2") and a
	   similar pathname.  A file might just happen to be called "sdb2" in the directory
	   "/dev" (consider some non-Unix VM image).

	   In the current API we usually resolve this ambiguity by having two separate calls, for
	   example "guestfs_checksum" and "guestfs_checksum_device".  Some API calls are
	   ambiguous and (incorrectly) resolve the problem by detecting if the path supplied
	   begins with "/dev/".

	   To avoid both the ambiguity and the need to duplicate some calls, we could make
	   paths/devices into structured names.  One way to do this would be to use a notation
	   like grub ("hd(0,0)"), although nobody really likes this aspect of grub.  Another way
	   would be to use a structured type, equivalent to this OCaml type:

	    type path = Path of string | Device of int | Partition of int * int

	   which would allow you to pass arguments like:

	    Path "/foo/bar"
	    Device 1		(* /dev/sdb, or perhaps /dev/sda *)
	    Partition (1, 2)	(* /dev/sdb2 (or is it /dev/sda2 or /dev/sdb3?) *)
	    Path "/dev/sdb2"	(* not a device *)

	   As you can see there are still problems to resolve even with this representation.
	   Also consider how it might work in guestfish.

   KEYS AND PASSPHRASES
       Certain libguestfs calls take a parameter that contains sensitive key material, passed in
       as a C string.

       In the future we would hope to change the libguestfs implementation so that keys are
       mlock(2)-ed into physical RAM, and thus can never end up in swap.  However this is not
       done at the moment, because of the complexity of such an implementation.

       Therefore you should be aware that any key parameter you pass to libguestfs might end up
       being written out to the swap partition.  If this is a concern, scrub the swap partition
       or don't use libguestfs on encrypted devices.

   MULTIPLE HANDLES AND MULTIPLE THREADS
       All high-level libguestfs actions are synchronous.  If you want to use libguestfs
       asynchronously then you must create a thread.

       Only use the handle from a single thread.  Either use the handle exclusively from one
       thread, or provide your own mutex so that two threads cannot issue calls on the same
       handle at the same time.  Even apparently innocent functions like "guestfs_get_trace" are
       not safe to be called from multiple threads without a mutex.

       See the graphical program guestfs-browser for one possible architecture for multithreaded
       programs using libvirt and libguestfs.

   PATH
       Libguestfs needs a supermin appliance, which it finds by looking along an internal path.

       By default it looks for these in the directory "$libdir/guestfs" (eg.
       "/usr/local/lib/guestfs" or "/usr/lib64/guestfs").

       Use "guestfs_set_path" or set the environment variable "LIBGUESTFS_PATH" to change the
       directories that libguestfs will search in.  The value is a colon-separated list of paths.
       The current directory is not searched unless the path contains an empty element or ".".
       For example "LIBGUESTFS_PATH=:/usr/lib/guestfs" would search the current directory and
       then "/usr/lib/guestfs".

   QEMU WRAPPERS
       If you want to compile your own qemu, run qemu from a non-standard location, or pass extra
       arguments to qemu, then you can write a shell-script wrapper around qemu.

       There is one important rule to remember: you must "exec qemu" as the last command in the
       shell script (so that qemu replaces the shell and becomes the direct child of the
       libguestfs-using program).  If you don't do this, then the qemu process won't be cleaned
       up correctly.

       Here is an example of a wrapper, where I have built my own copy of qemu from source:

	#!/bin/sh -
	qemudir=/home/rjones/d/qemu
	exec $qemudir/x86_64-softmmu/qemu-system-x86_64 -L $qemudir/pc-bios "$@"

       Save this script as "/tmp/qemu.wrapper" (or wherever), "chmod +x", and then use it by
       setting the LIBGUESTFS_QEMU environment variable.  For example:

	LIBGUESTFS_QEMU=/tmp/qemu.wrapper guestfish

       Note that libguestfs also calls qemu with the -help and -version options in order to
       determine features.

       Wrappers can also be used to edit the options passed to qemu.  In the following example,
       the "-machine ..." option ("-machine" and the following argument) are removed from the
       command line and replaced with "-machine pc,accel=tcg".	The while loop iterates over the
       options until it finds the right one to remove, putting the remaining options into the
       "args" array.

	#!/bin/bash -

	i=0
	while [ $# -gt 0 ]; do
	    case "$1" in
	    -machine)
		shift 2;;
	    *)
		args[i]="$1"
		(( i++ ))
		shift ;;
	    esac
	done

	exec qemu-kvm -machine pc,accel=tcg "${args[@]}"

   BACKEND
       The backend (previously known as the "attach method") controls how libguestfs creates
       and/or connects to the backend daemon, eg. by starting qemu directly, or by using libvirt
       to manage an appliance, or connecting to an already running daemon.

       You can set the backend by calling "guestfs_set_backend", or by setting the environment
       variable "LIBGUESTFS_BACKEND".

       Possible backends are described below:

       "direct"
       "appliance"
	   Run qemu directly to launch an appliance.

	   "direct" and "appliance" are synonyms.

	   This is the ordinary method and normally the default, but see the note below.

       "libvirt"
       "libvirt:URI"
	   Use libvirt to launch and manage the appliance.

	   The optional URI is the libvirt connection URI to use (see
	   http://libvirt.org/uri.html).  The typical libvirt backend with a URI would be
	   "libvirt:qemu:///session"

	   The libvirt backend supports more features, including hotplugging (see "HOTPLUGGING")
	   and sVirt.

       "unix:path"
	   Connect to the Unix domain socket path.

	   This method lets you connect to an existing daemon or (using virtio-serial) to a live
	   guest.  For more information, see "ATTACHING TO RUNNING DAEMONS".

       "direct" is usually the default backend.  However since libguestfs >= 1.19.24, libguestfs
       can be built with a different default by doing:

	./configure --with-default-backend=...

       To find out if libguestfs was compiled with a different default backend, do:

	unset LIBGUESTFS_BACKEND
	guestfish get-backend

   ATTACHING TO RUNNING DAEMONS
       Note (1): This is highly experimental and has a tendency to eat babies.	Use with caution.

       Note (2): This section explains how to attach to a running daemon from a low level
       perspective.  For most users, simply using virt tools such as guestfish(1) with the --live
       option will "just work".

       Using guestfs_set_backend

       By calling "guestfs_set_backend" you can change how the library connects to the "guestfsd"
       daemon in "guestfs_launch" (read "ARCHITECTURE" for some background).

       The normal backend is "direct", where a small appliance is created containing the daemon,
       and then the library connects to this.  "libvirt" or "libvirt:URI" are alternatives that
       use libvirt to start the appliance.

       Setting the backend to "unix:path" (where path is the path of a Unix domain socket) causes
       "guestfs_launch" to connect to an existing daemon over the Unix domain socket.

       The normal use for this is to connect to a running virtual machine that contains a
       "guestfsd" daemon, and send commands so you can read and write files inside the live
       virtual machine.

       Using guestfs_add_domain with live flag

       "guestfs_add_domain" provides some help for getting the correct backend.  If you pass the
       "live" option to this function, then (if the virtual machine is running) it will examine
       the libvirt XML looking for a virtio-serial channel to connect to:

	<domain>
	  ...
	  <devices>
	    ...
	    <channel type='unix'>
	      <source mode='bind' path='/path/to/socket'/>
	      <target type='virtio' name='org.libguestfs.channel.0'/>
	    </channel>
	    ...
	  </devices>
	</domain>

       "guestfs_add_domain" extracts "/path/to/socket" and sets the backend to
       "unix:/path/to/socket".

       Some of the libguestfs tools (including guestfish) support a --live option which is passed
       through to "guestfs_add_domain" thus allowing you to attach to and modify live virtual
       machines.

       The virtual machine needs to have been set up beforehand so that it has the virtio-serial
       channel and so that guestfsd is running inside it.

   ABI GUARANTEE
       We guarantee the libguestfs ABI (binary interface), for public, high-level actions as
       outlined in this section.  Although we will deprecate some actions, for example if they
       get replaced by newer calls, we will keep the old actions forever.  This allows you the
       developer to program in confidence against the libguestfs API.

   BLOCK DEVICE NAMING
       In the kernel there is now quite a profusion of schemata for naming block devices (in this
       context, by block device I mean a physical or virtual hard drive).  The original Linux IDE
       driver used names starting with "/dev/hd*".  SCSI devices have historically used a
       different naming scheme, "/dev/sd*".  When the Linux kernel libata driver became a popular
       replacement for the old IDE driver (particularly for SATA devices) those devices also used
       the "/dev/sd*" scheme.  Additionally we now have virtual machines with paravirtualized
       drivers.  This has created several different naming systems, such as "/dev/vd*" for virtio
       disks and "/dev/xvd*" for Xen PV disks.

       As discussed above, libguestfs uses a qemu appliance running an embedded Linux kernel to
       access block devices.  We can run a variety of appliances based on a variety of Linux
       kernels.

       This causes a problem for libguestfs because many API calls use device or partition names.
       Working scripts and the recipe (example) scripts that we make available over the internet
       could fail if the naming scheme changes.

       Therefore libguestfs defines "/dev/sd*" as the standard naming scheme.  Internally
       "/dev/sd*" names are translated, if necessary, to other names as required.  For example,
       under RHEL 5 which uses the "/dev/hd*" scheme, any device parameter "/dev/sda2" is
       translated to "/dev/hda2" transparently.

       Note that this only applies to parameters.  The "guestfs_list_devices",
       "guestfs_list_partitions" and similar calls return the true names of the devices and
       partitions as known to the appliance, but see "guestfs_canonical_device_name".

       DISK LABELS

       In libguestfs >= 1.20, you can give a label to a disk when you add it, using the optional
       "label" parameter to "guestfs_add_drive_opts".  (Note that disk labels are different from
       and not related to filesystem labels).

       Not all versions of libguestfs support setting a disk label, and when it is supported, it
       is limited to 20 ASCII characters "[a-zA-Z]".

       When you add a disk with a label, it can either be addressed using "/dev/sd*", or using
       "/dev/disk/guestfs/label".  Partitions on the disk can be addressed using
       "/dev/disk/guestfs/labelpartnum".

       Listing devices ("guestfs_list_devices") and partitions ("guestfs_list_partitions")
       returns the raw block device name.  However you can use "guestfs_list_disk_labels" to map
       disk labels to raw block device and partition names.

       ALGORITHM FOR BLOCK DEVICE NAME TRANSLATION

       Usually this translation is transparent.  However in some (very rare) cases you may need
       to know the exact algorithm.  Such cases include where you use "guestfs_config" to add a
       mixture of virtio and IDE devices to the qemu-based appliance, so have a mixture of
       "/dev/sd*" and "/dev/vd*" devices.

       The algorithm is applied only to parameters which are known to be either device or
       partition names.  Return values from functions such as "guestfs_list_devices" are never
       changed.

       o   Is the string a parameter which is a device or partition name?

       o   Does the string begin with "/dev/sd"?

       o   Does the named device exist?  If so, we use that device.  However if not then we
	   continue with this algorithm.

       o   Replace initial "/dev/sd" string with "/dev/hd".

	   For example, change "/dev/sda2" to "/dev/hda2".

	   If that named device exists, use it.  If not, continue.

       o   Replace initial "/dev/sd" string with "/dev/vd".

	   If that named device exists, use it.  If not, return an error.

       PORTABILITY CONCERNS WITH BLOCK DEVICE NAMING

       Although the standard naming scheme and automatic translation is useful for simple
       programs and guestfish scripts, for larger programs it is best not to rely on this
       mechanism.

       Where possible for maximum future portability programs using libguestfs should use these
       future-proof techniques:

       o   Use "guestfs_list_devices" or "guestfs_list_partitions" to list actual device names,
	   and then use those names directly.

	   Since those device names exist by definition, they will never be translated.

       o   Use higher level ways to identify filesystems, such as LVM names, UUIDs and filesystem
	   labels.

   NULL DISKS
       When adding a disk using, eg., "guestfs_add_drive", you can set the filename to
       "/dev/null".  This string is treated specially by libguestfs, causing it to add a "null
       disk".

       A null disk has the following properties:

       o   A null disk will appear as a normal device, eg. in calls to "guestfs_list_devices".

       o   You may add "/dev/null" multiple times.

       o   You should not try to access a null disk in any way.  For example, you shouldn't try
	   to read it or mount it.

       Null disks are used for three main purposes:

       1.  Performance testing of libguestfs (see guestfs-performance(1)).

       2.  The internal test suite.

       3.  If you want to use libguestfs APIs that don't refer to disks, since libguestfs
	   requires that at least one disk is added, you should add a null disk.

	   For example, to test if a feature is available, use code like this:

	    guestfs_h *g;
	    char **groups = [ "btrfs", NULL ];

	    g = guestfs_create ();
	    guestfs_add_drive (g, "/dev/null");
	    guestfs_launch (g);
	    if (guestfs_available (g, groups) == 0) {
	      // group(s) are available
	    } else {
	      // group(s) are not available
	    }
	    guestfs_close (g);

   DISK IMAGE FORMATS
       Virtual disks come in a variety of formats.  Some common formats are listed below.

       Note that libguestfs itself is not responsible for handling the disk format: this is done
       using qemu(1).  If support for a particular format is missing or broken, this has to be
       fixed in qemu.

       COMMON VIRTUAL DISK IMAGE FORMATS

       raw Raw format is simply a dump of the sequential bytes of the virtual hard disk.  There
	   is no header, container, compression or processing of any sort.

	   Since raw format requires no translation to read or write, it is both fast and very
	   well supported by qemu and all other hypervisors.  You can consider it to be a
	   universal format that any hypervisor can access.

	   Raw format files are not compressed and so take up the full space of the original disk
	   image even when they are empty.  A variation (on Linux/Unix at least) is to not store
	   ranges of all-zero bytes by storing the file as a sparse file.  This "variant format"
	   is sometimes called raw sparse.  Many utilities, including virt-sparsify(1), can make
	   raw disk images sparse.

       qcow2
	   Qcow2 is the native disk image format used by qemu.	Internally it uses a two-level
	   directory structure so that only blocks containing data are stored in the file.  It
	   also has many other features such as compression, snapshots and backing files.

	   There are at least two distinct variants of this format, although qemu (and hence
	   libguestfs) handles both transparently to the user.

       vmdk
	   VMDK is VMware's native disk image format.  There are many variations.  Modern qemu
	   (hence libguestfs) supports most variations, but you should be aware that older
	   versions of qemu had some very bad data-corrupting bugs in this area.

	   Note that VMware ESX exposes files with the name "guest-flat.vmdk".	These are not
	   VMDK.  They are raw format files which happen to have a ".vmdk" extension.

       vdi VDI is VirtualBox's native disk image format.  Qemu (hence libguestfs) has generally
	   good support for this.

       vpc
       vhd VPC (old) and VHD (modern) are the native disk image format of Microsoft (and
	   previously, Connectix) Virtual PC and Hyper-V.

       Obsolete formats
	   The following formats are obsolete and should not be used: qcow (aka qcow1), cow,
	   bochs.

       DETECTING THE FORMAT OF A DISK IMAGE

       Firstly note there is a security issue with auto-detecting the format of a disk image.  It
       may or may not apply in your use case.  Read "CVE-2010-3851" below.

       Libguestfs offers an API to get the format of a disk image ("guestfs_disk_format", and it
       is safest to use this.

       Don't be tempted to try parsing the text / human-readable output of "qemu-img" since it
       cannot be parsed reliably and securely.	Also do not use the "file" command since the
       output of that changes over time.

SECURITY
       This section discusses security implications of using libguestfs, particularly with
       untrusted or malicious guests or disk images.

   SECURITY OF MOUNTING FILESYSTEMS
       You should never mount an untrusted guest filesystem directly on your host kernel (eg.
       using loopback or kpartx).

       When you mount a filesystem, mistakes in the kernel filesystem (VFS) can be escalated into
       exploits by attackers creating a malicious filesystem.  These exploits are very severe for
       two reasons.  Firstly there are very many filesystem drivers in the kernel, and many of
       them are infrequently used and not much developer attention has been paid to the code.
       Linux userspace helps potential crackers by detecting the filesystem type and
       automatically choosing the right VFS driver, even if that filesystem type is unexpected.
       Secondly, a kernel-level exploit is like a local root exploit (worse in some ways), giving
       immediate and total access to the system right down to the hardware level.

       These exploits can be present in the kernel for a very long time
       (https://lwn.net/Articles/538898/).

       Libguestfs provides a layered approach to protecting you from exploits:

	  untrusted filesystem
	--------------------------------------
	  appliance kernel
	--------------------------------------
	  qemu process running as non-root
	--------------------------------------
	  sVirt [if using libvirt + SELinux]
	--------------------------------------
	  host kernel

       We run a Linux kernel inside a qemu virtual machine, usually running as a non-root user.
       The attacker would need to write a filesystem which first exploited the kernel, and then
       exploited either qemu virtualization (eg. a faulty qemu driver) or the libguestfs
       protocol, and finally to be as serious as the host kernel exploit it would need to
       escalate its privileges to root.  Additionally if you use the libvirt back end and
       SELinux, sVirt is used to confine the qemu process.  This multi-step escalation, performed
       by a static piece of data, is thought to be extremely hard to do, although we never say
       'never' about security issues.

       Callers can also reduce the attack surface by forcing the filesystem type when mounting
       (use "guestfs_mount_vfs").

   GENERAL SECURITY CONSIDERATIONS
       Be careful with any files or data that you download from a guest (by "download" we mean
       not just the "guestfs_download" command but any command that reads files, filenames,
       directories or anything else from a disk image).  An attacker could manipulate the data to
       fool your program into doing the wrong thing.  Consider cases such as:

       o   the data (file etc) not being present

       o   being present but empty

       o   being much larger than normal

       o   containing arbitrary 8 bit data

       o   being in an unexpected character encoding

       o   containing homoglyphs.

   PROTOCOL SECURITY
       The protocol is designed to be secure, being based on RFC 4506 (XDR) with a defined upper
       message size.  However a program that uses libguestfs must also take care - for example
       you can write a program that downloads a binary from a disk image and executes it locally,
       and no amount of protocol security will save you from the consequences.

   INSPECTION SECURITY
       Parts of the inspection API (see "INSPECTION") return untrusted strings directly from the
       guest, and these could contain any 8 bit data.  Callers should be careful to escape these
       before printing them to a structured file (for example, use HTML escaping if creating a
       web page).

       Guest configuration may be altered in unusual ways by the administrator of the virtual
       machine, and may not reflect reality (particularly for untrusted or actively malicious
       guests).  For example we parse the hostname from configuration files like
       "/etc/sysconfig/network" that we find in the guest, but the guest administrator can easily
       manipulate these files to provide the wrong hostname.

       The inspection API parses guest configuration using two external libraries: Augeas (Linux
       configuration) and hivex (Windows Registry).  Both are designed to be robust in the face
       of malicious data, although denial of service attacks are still possible, for example with
       oversized configuration files.

   RUNNING UNTRUSTED GUEST COMMANDS
       Be very cautious about running commands from the guest.	By running a command in the
       guest, you are giving CPU time to a binary that you do not control, under the same user
       account as the library, albeit wrapped in qemu virtualization.  More information and
       alternatives can be found in the section "RUNNING COMMANDS".

   CVE-2010-3851
       https://bugzilla.redhat.com/642934

       This security bug concerns the automatic disk format detection that qemu does on disk
       images.

       A raw disk image is just the raw bytes, there is no header.  Other disk images like qcow2
       contain a special header.  Qemu deals with this by looking for one of the known headers,
       and if none is found then assuming the disk image must be raw.

       This allows a guest which has been given a raw disk image to write some other header.  At
       next boot (or when the disk image is accessed by libguestfs) qemu would do autodetection
       and think the disk image format was, say, qcow2 based on the header written by the guest.

       This in itself would not be a problem, but qcow2 offers many features, one of which is to
       allow a disk image to refer to another image (called the "backing disk").  It does this by
       placing the path to the backing disk into the qcow2 header.  This path is not validated
       and could point to any host file (eg. "/etc/passwd").  The backing disk is then exposed
       through "holes" in the qcow2 disk image, which of course is completely under the control
       of the attacker.

       In libguestfs this is rather hard to exploit except under two circumstances:

       1.  You have enabled the network or have opened the disk in write mode.

       2.  You are also running untrusted code from the guest (see "RUNNING COMMANDS").

       The way to avoid this is to specify the expected disk format when adding disks (the
       optional "format" option to "guestfs_add_drive_opts").  You should always do this if the
       disk is raw format, and it's a good idea for other cases too.  (See also "DISK IMAGE
       FORMATS").

       For disks added from libvirt using calls like "guestfs_add_domain", the format is fetched
       from libvirt and passed through.

       For libguestfs tools, use the --format command line parameter as appropriate.

   CVE-2011-4127
       https://bugzilla.redhat.com/752375

       This is a bug in the kernel which allowed guests to overwrite parts of the host's drives
       which they should not normally have access to.

       It is sufficient to update libguestfs to any version >= 1.16 which contains a change that
       mitigates the problem.

   CVE-2012-2690
       https://bugzilla.redhat.com/831117

       Old versions of both virt-edit and the guestfish "edit" command created a new file
       containing the changes but did not set the permissions, etc of the new file to match the
       old one.  The result of this was that if you edited a security sensitive file such as
       "/etc/shadow" then it would be left world-readable after the edit.

       It is sufficient to update libguestfs to any version >= 1.16.

   CVE-2013-2124
       https://bugzilla.redhat.com/968306

       This security bug was a flaw in inspection where an untrusted guest using a specially
       crafted file in the guest OS could cause a double-free in the C library (denial of
       service).

       It is sufficient to update libguestfs to a version that is not vulnerable: libguestfs >=
       1.20.8, >= 1.22.2 or >= 1.23.2.

   CVE-2013-4419
       https://bugzilla.redhat.com/1016960

       When using the guestfish(1) --remote or guestfish --listen options, guestfish would create
       a socket in a known location ("/tmp/.guestfish-$UID/socket-$PID").

       The location has to be a known one in order for both ends to communicate.  However no
       checking was done that the containing directory ("/tmp/.guestfish-$UID") is owned by the
       user.  Thus another user could create this directory and potentially hijack sockets owned
       by another user's guestfish client or server.

       It is sufficient to update libguestfs to a version that is not vulnerable: libguestfs >=
       1.20.12, >= 1.22.7 or >= 1.24.

CONNECTION MANAGEMENT
   guestfs_h *
       "guestfs_h" is the opaque type representing a connection handle.  Create a handle by
       calling "guestfs_create" or "guestfs_create_flags".  Call "guestfs_close" to free the
       handle and release all resources used.

       For information on using multiple handles and threads, see the section "MULTIPLE HANDLES
       AND MULTIPLE THREADS" above.

   guestfs_create
	guestfs_h *guestfs_create (void);

       Create a connection handle.

       On success this returns a non-NULL pointer to a handle.	On error it returns NULL.

       You have to "configure" the handle after creating it.  This includes calling
       "guestfs_add_drive_opts" (or one of the equivalent calls) on the handle at least once.

       After configuring the handle, you have to call "guestfs_launch".

       You may also want to configure error handling for the handle.  See the "ERROR HANDLING"
       section below.

   guestfs_create_flags
	guestfs_h *guestfs_create_flags (unsigned flags [, ...]);

       Create a connection handle, supplying extra flags and extra arguments to control how the
       handle is created.

       On success this returns a non-NULL pointer to a handle.	On error it returns NULL.

       "guestfs_create" is equivalent to calling guestfs_create_flags(0).

       The following flags may be logically ORed together.  (Currently no extra arguments are
       used).

       "GUESTFS_CREATE_NO_ENVIRONMENT"
	   Don't parse any environment variables (such as "LIBGUESTFS_DEBUG" etc).

	   You can call "guestfs_parse_environment" or "guestfs_parse_environment_list"
	   afterwards to parse environment variables.  Alternately, don't call these functions if
	   you want the handle to be unaffected by environment variables.  See the example below.

	   The default (if this flag is not given) is to implicitly call
	   "guestfs_parse_environment".

       "GUESTFS_CREATE_NO_CLOSE_ON_EXIT"
	   Don't try to close the handle in an atexit(3) handler if the program exits without
	   explicitly closing the handle.

	   The default (if this flag is not given) is to install such an atexit handler.

       USING "GUESTFS_CREATE_NO_ENVIRONMENT"

       You might use "GUESTFS_CREATE_NO_ENVIRONMENT" and an explicit call to
       "guestfs_parse_environment" like this:

	guestfs_h *g;
	int r;

	g = guestfs_create_flags (GUESTFS_CREATE_NO_ENVIRONMENT);
	if (!g) {
	  perror ("guestfs_create_flags");
	  exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
	}
	r = guestfs_parse_environment (g);
	if (r == -1)
	  exit (EXIT_FAILURE);

       Or to create a handle which is unaffected by environment variables, omit the call to
       "guestfs_parse_environment" from the above code.

       The above code has another advantage which is that any errors from parsing the environment
       are passed through the error handler, whereas "guestfs_create" prints errors on stderr and
       ignores them.

   guestfs_close
	void guestfs_close (guestfs_h *g);

       This closes the connection handle and frees up all resources used.  If a close callback
       was set on the handle, then it is called.

       The correct way to close the handle is:

	if (guestfs_shutdown (g) == -1) {
	  /* handle write errors here */
	}
	guestfs_close (g);

       "guestfs_shutdown" is only needed if all of the following are true:

       1.  one or more disks were added in read-write mode, and

       2.  guestfs_launch was called, and

       3.  you made some changes, and

       4.  you have a way to handle write errors (eg. by exiting with an error code or reporting
	   something to the user).

ERROR HANDLING
       API functions can return errors.  For example, almost all functions that return "int" will
       return "-1" to indicate an error.

       Additional information is available for errors: an error message string and optionally an
       error number (errno) if the thing that failed was a system call.

       You can get at the additional information about the last error on the handle by calling
       "guestfs_last_error", "guestfs_last_errno", and/or by setting up an error handler with
       "guestfs_set_error_handler".

       When the handle is created, a default error handler is installed which prints the error
       message string to "stderr".  For small short-running command line programs it is
       sufficient to do:

	if (guestfs_launch (g) == -1)
	  exit (EXIT_FAILURE);

       since the default error handler will ensure that an error message has been printed to
       "stderr" before the program exits.

       For other programs the caller will almost certainly want to install an alternate error
       handler or do error handling in-line as in the example below.  The non-C language bindings
       all install NULL error handlers and turn errors into exceptions using code similar to
       this:

	const char *msg;
	int errnum;

	/* This disables the default behaviour of printing errors
	   on stderr. */
	guestfs_set_error_handler (g, NULL, NULL);

	if (guestfs_launch (g) == -1) {
	  /* Examine the error message and print it, throw it,
	     etc. */
	  msg = guestfs_last_error (g);
	  errnum = guestfs_last_errno (g);

	  fprintf (stderr, "%s", msg);
	  if (errnum != 0)
	    fprintf (stderr, ": %s", strerror (errnum));
	  fprintf (stderr, "\n");

	  /* ... */
	}

       "guestfs_create" returns "NULL" if the handle cannot be created, and because there is no
       handle if this happens there is no way to get additional error information.  Since
       libguestfs >= 1.20, you can use "guestfs_create_flags" to properly deal with errors during
       handle creation, although the vast majority of programs can continue to use
       "guestfs_create" and not worry about this situation.

       Out of memory errors are handled differently.  The default action is to call abort(3).  If
       this is undesirable, then you can set a handler using "guestfs_set_out_of_memory_handler".

   guestfs_last_error
	const char *guestfs_last_error (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns the last error message that happened on "g".  If there has not been an error
       since the handle was created, then this returns "NULL".

       Note the returned string does not have a newline character at the end.  Most error
       messages are single lines.  Some are split over multiple lines and contain "\n" characters
       within the string but not at the end.

       The lifetime of the returned string is until the next error occurs on the same handle, or
       "guestfs_close" is called.  If you need to keep it longer, copy it.

   guestfs_last_errno
	int guestfs_last_errno (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns the last error number (errno) that happened on "g".

       If successful, an errno integer not equal to zero is returned.

       In many cases the special errno "ENOTSUP" is returned if you tried to call a function or
       use a feature which is not supported.

       If no error number is available, this returns 0.  This call can return 0 in three
       situations:

       1.  There has not been any error on the handle.

       2.  There has been an error but the errno was meaningless.  This corresponds to the case
	   where the error did not come from a failed system call, but for some other reason.

       3.  There was an error from a failed system call, but for some reason the errno was not
	   captured and returned.  This usually indicates a bug in libguestfs.

       Libguestfs tries to convert the errno from inside the applicance into a corresponding
       errno for the caller (not entirely trivial: the appliance might be running a completely
       different operating system from the library and error numbers are not standardized across
       Un*xen).  If this could not be done, then the error is translated to "EINVAL".  In
       practice this should only happen in very rare circumstances.

   guestfs_set_error_handler
	typedef void (*guestfs_error_handler_cb) (guestfs_h *g,
						  void *opaque,
						  const char *msg);
	void guestfs_set_error_handler (guestfs_h *g,
					guestfs_error_handler_cb cb,
					void *opaque);

       The callback "cb" will be called if there is an error.  The parameters passed to the
       callback are an opaque data pointer and the error message string.

       "errno" is not passed to the callback.  To get that the callback must call
       "guestfs_last_errno".

       Note that the message string "msg" is freed as soon as the callback function returns, so
       if you want to stash it somewhere you must make your own copy.

       The default handler prints messages on "stderr".

       If you set "cb" to "NULL" then no handler is called.

   guestfs_get_error_handler
	guestfs_error_handler_cb guestfs_get_error_handler (guestfs_h *g,
							    void **opaque_rtn);

       Returns the current error handler callback.

   guestfs_push_error_handler
	void guestfs_push_error_handler (guestfs_h *g,
					 guestfs_error_handler_cb cb,
					 void *opaque);

       This is the same as "guestfs_set_error_handler", except that the old error handler is
       stashed away in a stack inside the handle.  You can restore the previous error handler by
       calling "guestfs_pop_error_handler".

       Use the following code to temporarily disable errors around a function:

	guestfs_push_error_handler (g, NULL, NULL);
	guestfs_mkdir (g, "/foo"); /* We don't care if this fails. */
	guestfs_pop_error_handler (g);

   guestfs_pop_error_handler
	void guestfs_pop_error_handler (guestfs_h *g);

       Restore the previous error handler (see "guestfs_push_error_handler").

       If you pop the stack too many times, then the default error handler is restored.

   guestfs_set_out_of_memory_handler
	typedef void (*guestfs_abort_cb) (void);
	void guestfs_set_out_of_memory_handler (guestfs_h *g,
						guestfs_abort_cb);

       The callback "cb" will be called if there is an out of memory situation.  Note this
       callback must not return.

       The default is to call abort(3).

       You cannot set "cb" to "NULL".  You can't ignore out of memory situations.

   guestfs_get_out_of_memory_handler
	guestfs_abort_fn guestfs_get_out_of_memory_handler (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns the current out of memory handler.

API CALLS
   guestfs_acl_delete_def_file
	int
	guestfs_acl_delete_def_file (guestfs_h *g,
				     const char *dir);

       This function deletes the default POSIX Access Control List (ACL) attached to directory
       "dir".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.63)

   guestfs_acl_get_file
	char *
	guestfs_acl_get_file (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *path,
			      const char *acltype);

       This function returns the POSIX Access Control List (ACL) attached to "path".  The ACL is
       returned in "long text form" (see acl(5)).

       The "acltype" parameter may be:

       "access"
	   Return the ordinary (access) ACL for any file, directory or other filesystem object.

       "default"
	   Return the default ACL.  Normally this only makes sense if "path" is a directory.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.19.63)

   guestfs_acl_set_file
	int
	guestfs_acl_set_file (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *path,
			      const char *acltype,
			      const char *acl);

       This function sets the POSIX Access Control List (ACL) attached to "path".

       The "acltype" parameter may be:

       "access"
	   Set the ordinary (access) ACL for any file, directory or other filesystem object.

       "default"
	   Set the default ACL.  Normally this only makes sense if "path" is a directory.

       The "acl" parameter is the new ACL in either "long text form" or "short text form" (see
       acl(5)).  The new ACL completely replaces any previous ACL on the file.	The ACL must
       contain the full Unix permissions (eg. "u::rwx,g::rx,o::rx").

       If you are specifying individual users or groups, then the mask field is also required
       (eg. "m::rwx"), followed by the "u:ID:..." and/or "g:ID:..." field(s).  A full ACL string
       might therefore look like this:

	u::rwx,g::rwx,o::rwx,m::rwx,u:500:rwx,g:500:rwx
	\ Unix permissions / \mask/ \	   ACL	      /

       You should use numeric UIDs and GIDs.  To map usernames and groupnames to the correct
       numeric ID in the context of the guest, use the Augeas functions (see "guestfs_aug_init").

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.63)

   guestfs_add_cdrom
	int
	guestfs_add_cdrom (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *filename);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_add_drive" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This function adds a virtual CD-ROM disk image to the guest.

       Do not use this function!  ISO files are just ordinary read-only disk images.  Use
       "guestfs_add_drive_ro" instead.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_add_domain
	int
	guestfs_add_domain (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *dom,
			    ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_ADD_DOMAIN_LIBVIRTURI, const char *libvirturi,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DOMAIN_READONLY, int readonly,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DOMAIN_IFACE, const char *iface,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DOMAIN_LIVE, int live,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DOMAIN_ALLOWUUID, int allowuuid,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DOMAIN_READONLYDISK, const char *readonlydisk,

       This function adds the disk(s) attached to the named libvirt domain "dom".  It works by
       connecting to libvirt, requesting the domain and domain XML from libvirt, parsing it for
       disks, and calling "guestfs_add_drive_opts" on each one.

       The number of disks added is returned.  This operation is atomic: if an error is returned,
       then no disks are added.

       This function does some minimal checks to make sure the libvirt domain is not running
       (unless "readonly" is true).  In a future version we will try to acquire the libvirt lock
       on each disk.

       Disks must be accessible locally.  This often means that adding disks from a remote
       libvirt connection (see http://libvirt.org/remote.html) will fail unless those disks are
       accessible via the same device path locally too.

       The optional "libvirturi" parameter sets the libvirt URI (see
       http://libvirt.org/uri.html).  If this is not set then we connect to the default libvirt
       URI (or one set through an environment variable, see the libvirt documentation for full
       details).

       The optional "live" flag controls whether this call will try to connect to a running
       virtual machine "guestfsd" process if it sees a suitable <channel> element in the libvirt
       XML definition.	The default (if the flag is omitted) is never to try.  See "ATTACHING TO
       RUNNING DAEMONS" in guestfs(3) for more information.

       If the "allowuuid" flag is true (default is false) then a UUID may be passed instead of
       the domain name.  The "dom" string is treated as a UUID first and looked up, and if that
       lookup fails then we treat "dom" as a name as usual.

       The optional "readonlydisk" parameter controls what we do for disks which are marked
       <readonly/> in the libvirt XML.	Possible values are:

       readonlydisk = "error"
	   If "readonly" is false:

	   The whole call is aborted with an error if any disk with the <readonly/> flag is
	   found.

	   If "readonly" is true:

	   Disks with the <readonly/> flag are added read-only.

       readonlydisk = "read"
	   If "readonly" is false:

	   Disks with the <readonly/> flag are added read-only.  Other disks are added
	   read/write.

	   If "readonly" is true:

	   Disks with the <readonly/> flag are added read-only.

       readonlydisk = "write" (default)
	   If "readonly" is false:

	   Disks with the <readonly/> flag are added read/write.

	   If "readonly" is true:

	   Disks with the <readonly/> flag are added read-only.

       readonlydisk = "ignore"
	   If "readonly" is true or false:

	   Disks with the <readonly/> flag are skipped.

       The other optional parameters are passed directly through to "guestfs_add_drive_opts".

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.7.4)

   guestfs_add_domain_va
	int
	guestfs_add_domain_va (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *dom,
			       va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_add_domain".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_add_domain_argv
	int
	guestfs_add_domain_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *dom,
				 const struct guestfs_add_domain_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_add_domain".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_add_drive
	int
	guestfs_add_drive (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *filename);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_add_drive_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_add_drive_opts
	int
	guestfs_add_drive_opts (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *filename,
				...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_READONLY, int readonly,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_FORMAT, const char *format,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_IFACE, const char *iface,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_NAME, const char *name,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_LABEL, const char *label,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_PROTOCOL, const char *protocol,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_SERVER, char *const *server,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_USERNAME, const char *username,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_SECRET, const char *secret,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_CACHEMODE, const char *cachemode,

       This function adds a disk image called "filename" to the handle.  "filename" may be a
       regular host file or a host device.

       When this function is called before "guestfs_launch" (the usual case) then the first time
       you call this function, the disk appears in the API as "/dev/sda", the second time as
       "/dev/sdb", and so on.

       In libguestfs >= 1.20 you can also call this function after launch (with some
       restrictions).  This is called "hotplugging".  When hotplugging, you must specify a
       "label" so that the new disk gets a predictable name.  For more information see
       "HOTPLUGGING" in guestfs(3).

       You don't necessarily need to be root when using libguestfs.  However you obviously do
       need sufficient permissions to access the filename for whatever operations you want to
       perform (ie. read access if you just want to read the image or write access if you want to
       modify the image).

       This call checks that "filename" exists.

       "filename" may be the special string "/dev/null".  See "NULL DISKS" in guestfs(3).

       The optional arguments are:

       "readonly"
	   If true then the image is treated as read-only.  Writes are still allowed, but they
	   are stored in a temporary snapshot overlay which is discarded at the end.  The disk
	   that you add is not modified.

       "format"
	   This forces the image format.  If you omit this (or use "guestfs_add_drive" or
	   "guestfs_add_drive_ro") then the format is automatically detected.  Possible formats
	   include "raw" and "qcow2".

	   Automatic detection of the format opens you up to a potential security hole when
	   dealing with untrusted raw-format images.  See CVE-2010-3851 and RHBZ#642934.
	   Specifying the format closes this security hole.

       "iface"
	   This rarely-used option lets you emulate the behaviour of the deprecated
	   "guestfs_add_drive_with_if" call (q.v.)

       "name"
	   The name the drive had in the original guest, e.g. "/dev/sdb".  This is used as a hint
	   to the guest inspection process if it is available.

       "label"
	   Give the disk a label.  The label should be a unique, short string using only ASCII
	   characters "[a-zA-Z]".  As well as its usual name in the API (such as "/dev/sda"), the
	   drive will also be named "/dev/disk/guestfs/label".

	   See "DISK LABELS" in guestfs(3).

       "protocol"
	   The optional protocol argument can be used to select an alternate source protocol.

	   See also: "REMOTE STORAGE" in guestfs(3).

	   "protocol = "file""
	       "filename" is interpreted as a local file or device.  This is the default if the
	       optional protocol parameter is omitted.

	   "protocol = "nbd""
	       Connect to the Network Block Device server.  The "server" parameter must also be
	       supplied - see below.

	       See also: "NETWORK BLOCK DEVICE" in guestfs(3).

       "server"
	   For protocols which require access to a remote server, this is a list of server(s).

	    Protocol	   Number of servers required
	    --------	   --------------------------
	    file	   List must be empty or param not used at all
	    nbd 	   Exactly one

	   Each list element is a string specifying a server.  The string must be in one of the
	   following formats:

	    hostname
	    hostname:port
	    tcp:hostname
	    tcp:hostname:port
	    unix:/path/to/socket

	   If the port number is omitted, then the standard port number for the protocol is used
	   (see "/etc/services").

       "cachemode"
	   Choose whether or not libguestfs will obey sync operations (safe but slow) or not
	   (unsafe but fast).  The possible values for this string are:

	   "cachemode = "writeback""
	       This is the default.

	       Write operations in the API do not return until a write(2) call has completed in
	       the host [but note this does not imply that anything gets written to disk].

	       Sync operations in the API, including implicit syncs caused by filesystem
	       journalling, will not return until an fdatasync(2) call has completed in the host,
	       indicating that data has been committed to disk.

	   "cachemode = "unsafe""
	       In this mode, there are no guarantees.  Libguestfs may cache anything and ignore
	       sync requests.  This is suitable only for scratch or temporary disks.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.5.23)

   guestfs_add_drive_opts_va
	int
	guestfs_add_drive_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *filename,
				   va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_add_drive_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_add_drive_opts_argv
	int
	guestfs_add_drive_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				     const char *filename,
				     const struct guestfs_add_drive_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_add_drive_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_add_drive_ro
	int
	guestfs_add_drive_ro (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *filename);

       This function is the equivalent of calling "guestfs_add_drive_opts" with the optional
       parameter "GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_READONLY" set to 1, so the disk is added read-only, with
       the format being detected automatically.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.38)

   guestfs_add_drive_ro_with_if
	int
	guestfs_add_drive_ro_with_if (guestfs_h *g,
				      const char *filename,
				      const char *iface);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_add_drive" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This is the same as "guestfs_add_drive_ro" but it allows you to specify the QEMU interface
       emulation to use at run time.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.84)

   guestfs_add_drive_scratch
	int
	guestfs_add_drive_scratch (guestfs_h *g,
				   int64_t size,
				   ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_SCRATCH_NAME, const char *name,
	GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_SCRATCH_LABEL, const char *label,

       This command adds a temporary scratch drive to the handle.  The "size" parameter is the
       virtual size (in bytes).  The scratch drive is blank initially (all reads return zeroes
       until you start writing to it).	The drive is deleted when the handle is closed.

       The optional arguments "name" and "label" are passed through to "guestfs_add_drive".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

   guestfs_add_drive_scratch_va
	int
	guestfs_add_drive_scratch_va (guestfs_h *g,
				      int64_t size,
				      va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_add_drive_scratch".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_add_drive_scratch_argv
	int
	guestfs_add_drive_scratch_argv (guestfs_h *g,
					int64_t size,
					const struct guestfs_add_drive_scratch_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_add_drive_scratch".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_add_drive_with_if
	int
	guestfs_add_drive_with_if (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *filename,
				   const char *iface);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_add_drive" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This is the same as "guestfs_add_drive" but it allows you to specify the QEMU interface
       emulation to use at run time.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.84)

   guestfs_aug_clear
	int
	guestfs_aug_clear (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *augpath);

       Set the value associated with "path" to "NULL".	This is the same as the augtool(1)
       "clear" command.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.4)

   guestfs_aug_close
	int
	guestfs_aug_close (guestfs_h *g);

       Close the current Augeas handle and free up any resources used by it.  After calling this,
       you have to call "guestfs_aug_init" again before you can use any other Augeas functions.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.7)

   guestfs_aug_defnode
	struct guestfs_int_bool *
	guestfs_aug_defnode (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *name,
			     const char *expr,
			     const char *val);

       Defines a variable "name" whose value is the result of evaluating "expr".

       If "expr" evaluates to an empty nodeset, a node is created, equivalent to calling
       "guestfs_aug_set" "expr", "value".  "name" will be the nodeset containing that single
       node.

       On success this returns a pair containing the number of nodes in the nodeset, and a
       boolean flag if a node was created.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_int_bool *", or NULL if there was an error.  The
       caller must call "guestfs_free_int_bool" after use.

       (Added in 0.7)

   guestfs_aug_defvar
	int
	guestfs_aug_defvar (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *name,
			    const char *expr);

       Defines an Augeas variable "name" whose value is the result of evaluating "expr".  If
       "expr" is NULL, then "name" is undefined.

       On success this returns the number of nodes in "expr", or 0 if "expr" evaluates to
       something which is not a nodeset.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 0.7)

   guestfs_aug_get
	char *
	guestfs_aug_get (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *augpath);

       Look up the value associated with "path".  If "path" matches exactly one node, the "value"
       is returned.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 0.7)

   guestfs_aug_init
	int
	guestfs_aug_init (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *root,
			  int flags);

       Create a new Augeas handle for editing configuration files.  If there was any previous
       Augeas handle associated with this guestfs session, then it is closed.

       You must call this before using any other "guestfs_aug_*" commands.

       "root" is the filesystem root.  "root" must not be NULL, use "/" instead.

       The flags are the same as the flags defined in <augeas.h>, the logical or of the following
       integers:

       "AUG_SAVE_BACKUP" = 1
	   Keep the original file with a ".augsave" extension.

       "AUG_SAVE_NEWFILE" = 2
	   Save changes into a file with extension ".augnew", and do not overwrite original.
	   Overrides "AUG_SAVE_BACKUP".

       "AUG_TYPE_CHECK" = 4
	   Typecheck lenses.

	   This option is only useful when debugging Augeas lenses.  Use of this option may
	   require additional memory for the libguestfs appliance.  You may need to set the
	   "LIBGUESTFS_MEMSIZE" environment variable or call "guestfs_set_memsize".

       "AUG_NO_STDINC" = 8
	   Do not use standard load path for modules.

       "AUG_SAVE_NOOP" = 16
	   Make save a no-op, just record what would have been changed.

       "AUG_NO_LOAD" = 32
	   Do not load the tree in "guestfs_aug_init".

       To close the handle, you can call "guestfs_aug_close".

       To find out more about Augeas, see http://augeas.net/.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.7)

   guestfs_aug_insert
	int
	guestfs_aug_insert (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *augpath,
			    const char *label,
			    int before);

       Create a new sibling "label" for "path", inserting it into the tree before or after "path"
       (depending on the boolean flag "before").

       "path" must match exactly one existing node in the tree, and "label" must be a label, ie.
       not contain "/", "*" or end with a bracketed index "[N]".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.7)

   guestfs_aug_load
	int
	guestfs_aug_load (guestfs_h *g);

       Load files into the tree.

       See "aug_load" in the Augeas documentation for the full gory details.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.7)

   guestfs_aug_ls
	char **
	guestfs_aug_ls (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *augpath);

       This is just a shortcut for listing "guestfs_aug_match" "path/*" and sorting the resulting
       nodes into alphabetical order.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_aug_match
	char **
	guestfs_aug_match (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *augpath);

       Returns a list of paths which match the path expression "path".	The returned paths are
       sufficiently qualified so that they match exactly one node in the current tree.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 0.7)

   guestfs_aug_mv
	int
	guestfs_aug_mv (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *src,
			const char *dest);

       Move the node "src" to "dest".  "src" must match exactly one node.  "dest" is overwritten
       if it exists.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.7)

   guestfs_aug_rm
	int
	guestfs_aug_rm (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *augpath);

       Remove "path" and all of its children.

       On success this returns the number of entries which were removed.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 0.7)

   guestfs_aug_save
	int
	guestfs_aug_save (guestfs_h *g);

       This writes all pending changes to disk.

       The flags which were passed to "guestfs_aug_init" affect exactly how files are saved.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.7)

   guestfs_aug_set
	int
	guestfs_aug_set (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *augpath,
			 const char *val);

       Set the value associated with "path" to "val".

       In the Augeas API, it is possible to clear a node by setting the value to NULL.	Due to an
       oversight in the libguestfs API you cannot do that with this call.  Instead you must use
       the "guestfs_aug_clear" call.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.7)

   guestfs_available
	int
	guestfs_available (guestfs_h *g,
			   char *const *groups);

       This command is used to check the availability of some groups of functionality in the
       appliance, which not all builds of the libguestfs appliance will be able to provide.

       The libguestfs groups, and the functions that those groups correspond to, are listed in
       "AVAILABILITY" in guestfs(3).  You can also fetch this list at runtime by calling
       "guestfs_available_all_groups".

       The argument "groups" is a list of group names, eg: "["inotify", "augeas"]" would check
       for the availability of the Linux inotify functions and Augeas (configuration file
       editing) functions.

       The command returns no error if all requested groups are available.

       It fails with an error if one or more of the requested groups is unavailable in the
       appliance.

       If an unknown group name is included in the list of groups then an error is always
       returned.

       Notes:

       o   "guestfs_feature_available" is the same as this call, but with a slightly simpler to
	   use API: that call returns a boolean true/false instead of throwing an error.

       o   You must call "guestfs_launch" before calling this function.

	   The reason is because we don't know what groups are supported by the appliance/daemon
	   until it is running and can be queried.

       o   If a group of functions is available, this does not necessarily mean that they will
	   work.  You still have to check for errors when calling individual API functions even
	   if they are available.

       o   It is usually the job of distro packagers to build complete functionality into the
	   libguestfs appliance.  Upstream libguestfs, if built from source with all requirements
	   satisfied, will support everything.

       o   This call was added in version 1.0.80.  In previous versions of libguestfs all you
	   could do would be to speculatively execute a command to find out if the daemon
	   implemented it.  See also "guestfs_version".

       See also "guestfs_filesystem_available".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.80)

   guestfs_available_all_groups
	char **
	guestfs_available_all_groups (guestfs_h *g);

       This command returns a list of all optional groups that this daemon knows about.  Note
       this returns both supported and unsupported groups.  To find out which ones the daemon can
       actually support you have to call "guestfs_available" / "guestfs_feature_available" on
       each member of the returned list.

       See also "guestfs_available", "guestfs_feature_available" and "AVAILABILITY" in
       guestfs(3).

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.3.15)

   guestfs_base64_in
	int
	guestfs_base64_in (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *base64file,
			   const char *filename);

       This command uploads base64-encoded data from "base64file" to "filename".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.5)

   guestfs_base64_out
	int
	guestfs_base64_out (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *filename,
			    const char *base64file);

       This command downloads the contents of "filename", writing it out to local file
       "base64file" encoded as base64.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.5)

   guestfs_blkid
	char **
	guestfs_blkid (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *device);

       This command returns block device attributes for "device". The following fields are
       usually present in the returned hash. Other fields may also be present.

       "UUID"
	   The uuid of this device.

       "LABEL"
	   The label of this device.

       "VERSION"
	   The version of blkid command.

       "TYPE"
	   The filesystem type or RAID of this device.

       "USAGE"
	   The usage of this device, for example "filesystem" or "raid".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings, or NULL if there was an error.
       The array of strings will always have length "2n+1", where "n" keys and values alternate,
       followed by the trailing NULL entry.  The caller must free the strings and the array after
       use.

       (Added in 1.15.9)

   guestfs_blockdev_flushbufs
	int
	guestfs_blockdev_flushbufs (guestfs_h *g,
				    const char *device);

       This tells the kernel to flush internal buffers associated with "device".

       This uses the blockdev(8) command.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.9.3)

   guestfs_blockdev_getbsz
	int
	guestfs_blockdev_getbsz (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *device);

       This returns the block size of a device.

       Note: this is different from both size in blocks and filesystem block size.  Also this
       setting is not really used by anything.	You should probably not use it for anything.
       Filesystems have their own idea about what block size to choose.

       This uses the blockdev(8) command.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 0.9.3)

   guestfs_blockdev_getro
	int
	guestfs_blockdev_getro (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *device);

       Returns a boolean indicating if the block device is read-only (true if read-only, false if
       not).

       This uses the blockdev(8) command.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.9.3)

   guestfs_blockdev_getsize64
	int64_t
	guestfs_blockdev_getsize64 (guestfs_h *g,
				    const char *device);

       This returns the size of the device in bytes.

       See also "guestfs_blockdev_getsz".

       This uses the blockdev(8) command.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 0.9.3)

   guestfs_blockdev_getss
	int
	guestfs_blockdev_getss (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *device);

       This returns the size of sectors on a block device.  Usually 512, but can be larger for
       modern devices.

       (Note, this is not the size in sectors, use "guestfs_blockdev_getsz" for that).

       This uses the blockdev(8) command.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 0.9.3)

   guestfs_blockdev_getsz
	int64_t
	guestfs_blockdev_getsz (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *device);

       This returns the size of the device in units of 512-byte sectors (even if the sectorsize
       isn't 512 bytes ... weird).

       See also "guestfs_blockdev_getss" for the real sector size of the device, and
       "guestfs_blockdev_getsize64" for the more useful size in bytes.

       This uses the blockdev(8) command.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 0.9.3)

   guestfs_blockdev_rereadpt
	int
	guestfs_blockdev_rereadpt (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *device);

       Reread the partition table on "device".

       This uses the blockdev(8) command.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.9.3)

   guestfs_blockdev_setbsz
	int
	guestfs_blockdev_setbsz (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *device,
				 int blocksize);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_mkfs" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This call does nothing and has never done anything because of a bug in blockdev.  Do not
       use it.

       If you need to set the filesystem block size, use the "blocksize" option of
       "guestfs_mkfs".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.9.3)

   guestfs_blockdev_setro
	int
	guestfs_blockdev_setro (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *device);

       Sets the block device named "device" to read-only.

       This uses the blockdev(8) command.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.9.3)

   guestfs_blockdev_setrw
	int
	guestfs_blockdev_setrw (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *device);

       Sets the block device named "device" to read-write.

       This uses the blockdev(8) command.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.9.3)

   guestfs_btrfs_device_add
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_device_add (guestfs_h *g,
				  char *const *devices,
				  const char *fs);

       Add the list of device(s) in "devices" to the btrfs filesystem mounted at "fs".	If
       "devices" is an empty list, this does nothing.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.35)

   guestfs_btrfs_device_delete
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_device_delete (guestfs_h *g,
				     char *const *devices,
				     const char *fs);

       Remove the "devices" from the btrfs filesystem mounted at "fs".	If "devices" is an empty
       list, this does nothing.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.35)

   guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_balance
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_balance (guestfs_h *g,
					  const char *fs);

       Balance the chunks in the btrfs filesystem mounted at "fs" across the underlying devices.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.35)

   guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_resize
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_resize (guestfs_h *g,
					 const char *mountpoint,
					 ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_BTRFS_FILESYSTEM_RESIZE_SIZE, int64_t size,

       This command resizes a btrfs filesystem.

       Note that unlike other resize calls, the filesystem has to be mounted and the parameter is
       the mountpoint not the device (this is a requirement of btrfs itself).

       The optional parameters are:

       "size"
	   The new size (in bytes) of the filesystem.  If omitted, the filesystem is resized to
	   the maximum size.

       See also btrfs(8).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.11.17)

   guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_resize_va
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_resize_va (guestfs_h *g,
					    const char *mountpoint,
					    va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_resize".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_resize_argv
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_resize_argv (guestfs_h *g,
					      const char *mountpoint,
					      const struct guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_resize_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_resize".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_sync
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_sync (guestfs_h *g,
				       const char *fs);

       Force sync on the btrfs filesystem mounted at "fs".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.35)

   guestfs_btrfs_fsck
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_fsck (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *device,
			    ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_BTRFS_FSCK_SUPERBLOCK, int64_t superblock,
	GUESTFS_BTRFS_FSCK_REPAIR, int repair,

       Used to check a btrfs filesystem, "device" is the device file where the filesystem is
       stored.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.43)

   guestfs_btrfs_fsck_va
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_fsck_va (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *device,
			       va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_btrfs_fsck".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_btrfs_fsck_argv
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_fsck_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *device,
				 const struct guestfs_btrfs_fsck_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_btrfs_fsck".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_btrfs_set_seeding
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_set_seeding (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *device,
				   int seeding);

       Enable or disable the seeding feature of a device that contains a btrfs filesystem.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.43)

   guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_create
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_create (guestfs_h *g,
					const char *dest);

       Create a btrfs subvolume.  The "dest" argument is the destination directory and the name
       of the snapshot, in the form "/path/to/dest/name".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.35)

   guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_delete
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_delete (guestfs_h *g,
					const char *subvolume);

       Delete the named btrfs subvolume.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.35)

   guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_list
	struct guestfs_btrfssubvolume_list *
	guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_list (guestfs_h *g,
				      const char *fs);

       List the btrfs snapshots and subvolumes of the btrfs filesystem which is mounted at "fs".

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_btrfssubvolume_list *", or NULL if there was an
       error.  The caller must call "guestfs_free_btrfssubvolume_list" after use.

       (Added in 1.17.35)

   guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_set_default
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_set_default (guestfs_h *g,
					     int64_t id,
					     const char *fs);

       Set the subvolume of the btrfs filesystem "fs" which will be mounted by default.  See
       "guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_list" to get a list of subvolumes.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.35)

   guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_snapshot
	int
	guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_snapshot (guestfs_h *g,
					  const char *source,
					  const char *dest);

       Create a writable snapshot of the btrfs subvolume "source".  The "dest" argument is the
       destination directory and the name of the snapshot, in the form "/path/to/dest/name".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.35)

   guestfs_canonical_device_name
	char *
	guestfs_canonical_device_name (guestfs_h *g,
				       const char *device);

       This utility function is useful when displaying device names to the user.  It takes a
       number of irregular device names and returns them in a consistent format:

       "/dev/hdX"
       "/dev/vdX"
	   These are returned as "/dev/sdX".  Note this works for device names and partition
	   names.  This is approximately the reverse of the algorithm described in "BLOCK DEVICE
	   NAMING" in guestfs(3).

       "/dev/mapper/VG-LV"
       "/dev/dm-N"
	   Converted to "/dev/VG/LV" form using "guestfs_lvm_canonical_lvm_name".

       Other strings are returned unmodified.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.19.7)

   guestfs_cap_get_file
	char *
	guestfs_cap_get_file (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *path);

       This function returns the Linux capabilities attached to "path".  The capabilities set is
       returned in text form (see cap_to_text(3)).

       If no capabilities are attached to a file, an empty string is returned.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.19.63)

   guestfs_cap_set_file
	int
	guestfs_cap_set_file (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *path,
			      const char *cap);

       This function sets the Linux capabilities attached to "path".  The capabilities set "cap"
       should be passed in text form (see cap_from_text(3)).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.63)

   guestfs_case_sensitive_path
	char *
	guestfs_case_sensitive_path (guestfs_h *g,
				     const char *path);

       This can be used to resolve case insensitive paths on a filesystem which is case
       sensitive.  The use case is to resolve paths which you have read from Windows
       configuration files or the Windows Registry, to the true path.

       The command handles a peculiarity of the Linux ntfs-3g filesystem driver (and probably
       others), which is that although the underlying filesystem is case-insensitive, the driver
       exports the filesystem to Linux as case-sensitive.

       One consequence of this is that special directories such as "c:\windows" may appear as
       "/WINDOWS" or "/windows" (or other things) depending on the precise details of how they
       were created.  In Windows itself this would not be a problem.

       Bug or feature?	You decide: http://www.tuxera.com/community/ntfs-3g-faq/#posixfilenames1

       This function resolves the true case of each element in the path and returns the case-
       sensitive path.

       Thus "guestfs_case_sensitive_path" ("/Windows/System32") might return "/WINDOWS/system32"
       (the exact return value would depend on details of how the directories were originally
       created under Windows).

       Note: This function does not handle drive names, backslashes etc.

       See also "guestfs_realpath".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.75)

   guestfs_cat
	char *
	guestfs_cat (guestfs_h *g,
		     const char *path);

       Return the contents of the file named "path".

       Because, in C, this function returns a "char *", there is no way to differentiate between
       a "\0" character in a file and end of string.  To handle binary files, use the
       "guestfs_read_file" or "guestfs_download" functions.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 0.4)

   guestfs_checksum
	char *
	guestfs_checksum (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *csumtype,
			  const char *path);

       This call computes the MD5, SHAx or CRC checksum of the file named "path".

       The type of checksum to compute is given by the "csumtype" parameter which must have one
       of the following values:

       "crc"
	   Compute the cyclic redundancy check (CRC) specified by POSIX for the "cksum" command.

       "md5"
	   Compute the MD5 hash (using the "md5sum" program).

       "sha1"
	   Compute the SHA1 hash (using the "sha1sum" program).

       "sha224"
	   Compute the SHA224 hash (using the "sha224sum" program).

       "sha256"
	   Compute the SHA256 hash (using the "sha256sum" program).

       "sha384"
	   Compute the SHA384 hash (using the "sha384sum" program).

       "sha512"
	   Compute the SHA512 hash (using the "sha512sum" program).

       The checksum is returned as a printable string.

       To get the checksum for a device, use "guestfs_checksum_device".

       To get the checksums for many files, use "guestfs_checksums_out".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.2)

   guestfs_checksum_device
	char *
	guestfs_checksum_device (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *csumtype,
				 const char *device);

       This call computes the MD5, SHAx or CRC checksum of the contents of the device named
       "device".  For the types of checksums supported see the "guestfs_checksum" command.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.3.2)

   guestfs_checksums_out
	int
	guestfs_checksums_out (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *csumtype,
			       const char *directory,
			       const char *sumsfile);

       This command computes the checksums of all regular files in "directory" and then emits a
       list of those checksums to the local output file "sumsfile".

       This can be used for verifying the integrity of a virtual machine.  However to be properly
       secure you should pay attention to the output of the checksum command (it uses the ones
       from GNU coreutils).  In particular when the filename is not printable, coreutils uses a
       special backslash syntax.  For more information, see the GNU coreutils info file.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.7)

   guestfs_chmod
	int
	guestfs_chmod (guestfs_h *g,
		       int mode,
		       const char *path);

       Change the mode (permissions) of "path" to "mode".  Only numeric modes are supported.

       Note: When using this command from guestfish, "mode" by default would be decimal, unless
       you prefix it with 0 to get octal, ie. use 0700 not 700.

       The mode actually set is affected by the umask.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_chown
	int
	guestfs_chown (guestfs_h *g,
		       int owner,
		       int group,
		       const char *path);

       Change the file owner to "owner" and group to "group".

       Only numeric uid and gid are supported.	If you want to use names, you will need to locate
       and parse the password file yourself (Augeas support makes this relatively easy).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_command
	char *
	guestfs_command (guestfs_h *g,
			 char *const *arguments);

       This call runs a command from the guest filesystem.  The filesystem must be mounted, and
       must contain a compatible operating system (ie. something Linux, with the same or
       compatible processor architecture).

       The single parameter is an argv-style list of arguments.  The first element is the name of
       the program to run.  Subsequent elements are parameters.  The list must be non-empty (ie.
       must contain a program name).  Note that the command runs directly, and is not invoked via
       the shell (see "guestfs_sh").

       The return value is anything printed to stdout by the command.

       If the command returns a non-zero exit status, then this function returns an error
       message.  The error message string is the content of stderr from the command.

       The $PATH environment variable will contain at least "/usr/bin" and "/bin".  If you
       require a program from another location, you should provide the full path in the first
       parameter.

       Shared libraries and data files required by the program must be available on filesystems
       which are mounted in the correct places.  It is the caller's responsibility to ensure all
       filesystems that are needed are mounted at the right locations.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 0.9.1)

   guestfs_command_lines
	char **
	guestfs_command_lines (guestfs_h *g,
			       char *const *arguments);

       This is the same as "guestfs_command", but splits the result into a list of lines.

       See also: "guestfs_sh_lines"

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 0.9.1)

   guestfs_compress_device_out
	int
	guestfs_compress_device_out (guestfs_h *g,
				     const char *ctype,
				     const char *device,
				     const char *zdevice,
				     ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_COMPRESS_DEVICE_OUT_LEVEL, int level,

       This command compresses "device" and writes it out to the local file "zdevice".

       The "ctype" and optional "level" parameters have the same meaning as in
       "guestfs_compress_out".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.13.15)

   guestfs_compress_device_out_va
	int
	guestfs_compress_device_out_va (guestfs_h *g,
					const char *ctype,
					const char *device,
					const char *zdevice,
					va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_compress_device_out".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_compress_device_out_argv
	int
	guestfs_compress_device_out_argv (guestfs_h *g,
					  const char *ctype,
					  const char *device,
					  const char *zdevice,
					  const struct guestfs_compress_device_out_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_compress_device_out".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_compress_out
	int
	guestfs_compress_out (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *ctype,
			      const char *file,
			      const char *zfile,
			      ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_COMPRESS_OUT_LEVEL, int level,

       This command compresses "file" and writes it out to the local file "zfile".

       The compression program used is controlled by the "ctype" parameter.  Currently this
       includes: "compress", "gzip", "bzip2", "xz" or "lzop".  Some compression types may not be
       supported by particular builds of libguestfs, in which case you will get an error
       containing the substring "not supported".

       The optional "level" parameter controls compression level.  The meaning and default for
       this parameter depends on the compression program being used.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.13.15)

   guestfs_compress_out_va
	int
	guestfs_compress_out_va (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *ctype,
				 const char *file,
				 const char *zfile,
				 va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_compress_out".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_compress_out_argv
	int
	guestfs_compress_out_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *ctype,
				   const char *file,
				   const char *zfile,
				   const struct guestfs_compress_out_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_compress_out".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_config
	int
	guestfs_config (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *qemuparam,
			const char *qemuvalue);

       This can be used to add arbitrary qemu command line parameters of the form -param value.
       Actually it's not quite arbitrary - we prevent you from setting some parameters which
       would interfere with parameters that we use.

       The first character of "qemuparam" string must be a "-" (dash).

       "qemuvalue" can be NULL.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_copy_device_to_device
	int
	guestfs_copy_device_to_device (guestfs_h *g,
				       const char *src,
				       const char *dest,
				       ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_COPY_DEVICE_TO_DEVICE_SRCOFFSET, int64_t srcoffset,
	GUESTFS_COPY_DEVICE_TO_DEVICE_DESTOFFSET, int64_t destoffset,
	GUESTFS_COPY_DEVICE_TO_DEVICE_SIZE, int64_t size,
	GUESTFS_COPY_DEVICE_TO_DEVICE_SPARSE, int sparse,

       The four calls "guestfs_copy_device_to_device", "guestfs_copy_device_to_file",
       "guestfs_copy_file_to_device", and "guestfs_copy_file_to_file" let you copy from a source
       (device|file) to a destination (device|file).

       Partial copies can be made since you can specify optionally the source offset, destination
       offset and size to copy.  These values are all specified in bytes.  If not given, the
       offsets both default to zero, and the size defaults to copying as much as possible until
       we hit the end of the source.

       The source and destination may be the same object.  However overlapping regions may not be
       copied correctly.

       If the destination is a file, it is created if required.  If the destination file is not
       large enough, it is extended.

       If the "sparse" flag is true then the call avoids writing blocks that contain only zeroes,
       which can help in some situations where the backing disk is thin-provisioned.  Note that
       unless the target is already zeroed, using this option will result in incorrect copying.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.13.25)

   guestfs_copy_device_to_device_va
	int
	guestfs_copy_device_to_device_va (guestfs_h *g,
					  const char *src,
					  const char *dest,
					  va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_copy_device_to_device".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_copy_device_to_device_argv
	int
	guestfs_copy_device_to_device_argv (guestfs_h *g,
					    const char *src,
					    const char *dest,
					    const struct guestfs_copy_device_to_device_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_copy_device_to_device".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_copy_device_to_file
	int
	guestfs_copy_device_to_file (guestfs_h *g,
				     const char *src,
				     const char *dest,
				     ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_COPY_DEVICE_TO_FILE_SRCOFFSET, int64_t srcoffset,
	GUESTFS_COPY_DEVICE_TO_FILE_DESTOFFSET, int64_t destoffset,
	GUESTFS_COPY_DEVICE_TO_FILE_SIZE, int64_t size,
	GUESTFS_COPY_DEVICE_TO_FILE_SPARSE, int sparse,

       See "guestfs_copy_device_to_device" for a general overview of this call.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.13.25)

   guestfs_copy_device_to_file_va
	int
	guestfs_copy_device_to_file_va (guestfs_h *g,
					const char *src,
					const char *dest,
					va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_copy_device_to_file".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_copy_device_to_file_argv
	int
	guestfs_copy_device_to_file_argv (guestfs_h *g,
					  const char *src,
					  const char *dest,
					  const struct guestfs_copy_device_to_file_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_copy_device_to_file".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_copy_file_to_device
	int
	guestfs_copy_file_to_device (guestfs_h *g,
				     const char *src,
				     const char *dest,
				     ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_COPY_FILE_TO_DEVICE_SRCOFFSET, int64_t srcoffset,
	GUESTFS_COPY_FILE_TO_DEVICE_DESTOFFSET, int64_t destoffset,
	GUESTFS_COPY_FILE_TO_DEVICE_SIZE, int64_t size,
	GUESTFS_COPY_FILE_TO_DEVICE_SPARSE, int sparse,

       See "guestfs_copy_device_to_device" for a general overview of this call.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.13.25)

   guestfs_copy_file_to_device_va
	int
	guestfs_copy_file_to_device_va (guestfs_h *g,
					const char *src,
					const char *dest,
					va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_copy_file_to_device".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_copy_file_to_device_argv
	int
	guestfs_copy_file_to_device_argv (guestfs_h *g,
					  const char *src,
					  const char *dest,
					  const struct guestfs_copy_file_to_device_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_copy_file_to_device".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_copy_file_to_file
	int
	guestfs_copy_file_to_file (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *src,
				   const char *dest,
				   ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_COPY_FILE_TO_FILE_SRCOFFSET, int64_t srcoffset,
	GUESTFS_COPY_FILE_TO_FILE_DESTOFFSET, int64_t destoffset,
	GUESTFS_COPY_FILE_TO_FILE_SIZE, int64_t size,
	GUESTFS_COPY_FILE_TO_FILE_SPARSE, int sparse,

       See "guestfs_copy_device_to_device" for a general overview of this call.

       This is not the function you want for copying files.  This is for copying blocks within
       existing files.	See "guestfs_cp", "guestfs_cp_a" and "guestfs_mv" for general file
       copying and moving functions.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.13.25)

   guestfs_copy_file_to_file_va
	int
	guestfs_copy_file_to_file_va (guestfs_h *g,
				      const char *src,
				      const char *dest,
				      va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_copy_file_to_file".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_copy_file_to_file_argv
	int
	guestfs_copy_file_to_file_argv (guestfs_h *g,
					const char *src,
					const char *dest,
					const struct guestfs_copy_file_to_file_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_copy_file_to_file".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_copy_size
	int
	guestfs_copy_size (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *src,
			   const char *dest,
			   int64_t size);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_copy_device_to_device" call
       instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This command copies exactly "size" bytes from one source device or file "src" to another
       destination device or file "dest".

       Note this will fail if the source is too short or if the destination is not large enough.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.87)

   guestfs_cp
	int
	guestfs_cp (guestfs_h *g,
		    const char *src,
		    const char *dest);

       This copies a file from "src" to "dest" where "dest" is either a destination filename or
       destination directory.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.18)

   guestfs_cp_a
	int
	guestfs_cp_a (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *src,
		      const char *dest);

       This copies a file or directory from "src" to "dest" recursively using the "cp -a"
       command.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.18)

   guestfs_cp_r
	int
	guestfs_cp_r (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *src,
		      const char *dest);

       This copies a file or directory from "src" to "dest" recursively using the "cp -rP"
       command.

       Most users should use "guestfs_cp_a" instead.  This command is useful when you don't want
       to preserve permissions, because the target filesystem does not support it (primarily when
       writing to DOS FAT filesystems).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.21.38)

   guestfs_dd
	int
	guestfs_dd (guestfs_h *g,
		    const char *src,
		    const char *dest);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_copy_device_to_device" call
       instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This command copies from one source device or file "src" to another destination device or
       file "dest".  Normally you would use this to copy to or from a device or partition, for
       example to duplicate a filesystem.

       If the destination is a device, it must be as large or larger than the source file or
       device, otherwise the copy will fail.  This command cannot do partial copies (see
       "guestfs_copy_device_to_device").

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.80)

   guestfs_device_index
	int
	guestfs_device_index (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *device);

       This function takes a device name (eg. "/dev/sdb") and returns the index of the device in
       the list of devices.

       Index numbers start from 0.  The named device must exist, for example as a string returned
       from "guestfs_list_devices".

       See also "guestfs_list_devices", "guestfs_part_to_dev".

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.19.7)

   guestfs_df
	char *
	guestfs_df (guestfs_h *g);

       This command runs the "df" command to report disk space used.

       This command is mostly useful for interactive sessions.	It is not intended that you try
       to parse the output string.  Use "guestfs_statvfs" from programs.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.54)

   guestfs_df_h
	char *
	guestfs_df_h (guestfs_h *g);

       This command runs the "df -h" command to report disk space used in human-readable format.

       This command is mostly useful for interactive sessions.	It is not intended that you try
       to parse the output string.  Use "guestfs_statvfs" from programs.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.54)

   guestfs_disk_format
	char *
	guestfs_disk_format (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *filename);

       Detect and return the format of the disk image called "filename".  "filename" can also be
       a host device, etc.  If the format of the image could not be detected, then "unknown" is
       returned.

       Note that detecting the disk format can be insecure under some circumstances.  See
       "CVE-2010-3851" in guestfs(3).

       See also: "DISK IMAGE FORMATS" in guestfs(3)

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.19.38)

   guestfs_disk_has_backing_file
	int
	guestfs_disk_has_backing_file (guestfs_h *g,
				       const char *filename);

       Detect and return whether the disk image "filename" has a backing file.

       Note that detecting disk features can be insecure under some circumstances.  See
       "CVE-2010-3851" in guestfs(3).

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.39)

   guestfs_disk_virtual_size
	int64_t
	guestfs_disk_virtual_size (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *filename);

       Detect and return the virtual size in bytes of the disk image called "filename".

       Note that detecting disk features can be insecure under some circumstances.  See
       "CVE-2010-3851" in guestfs(3).

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.19.39)

   guestfs_dmesg
	char *
	guestfs_dmesg (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns the kernel messages ("dmesg" output) from the guest kernel.  This is
       sometimes useful for extended debugging of problems.

       Another way to get the same information is to enable verbose messages with
       "guestfs_set_verbose" or by setting the environment variable "LIBGUESTFS_DEBUG=1" before
       running the program.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.18)

   guestfs_download
	int
	guestfs_download (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *remotefilename,
			  const char *filename);

       Download file "remotefilename" and save it as "filename" on the local machine.

       "filename" can also be a named pipe.

       See also "guestfs_upload", "guestfs_cat".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.2)

   guestfs_download_offset
	int
	guestfs_download_offset (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *remotefilename,
				 const char *filename,
				 int64_t offset,
				 int64_t size);

       Download file "remotefilename" and save it as "filename" on the local machine.

       "remotefilename" is read for "size" bytes starting at "offset" (this region must be within
       the file or device).

       Note that there is no limit on the amount of data that can be downloaded with this call,
       unlike with "guestfs_pread", and this call always reads the full amount unless an error
       occurs.

       See also "guestfs_download", "guestfs_pread".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.5.17)

   guestfs_drop_caches
	int
	guestfs_drop_caches (guestfs_h *g,
			     int whattodrop);

       This instructs the guest kernel to drop its page cache, and/or dentries and inode caches.
       The parameter "whattodrop" tells the kernel what precisely to drop, see
       http://linux-mm.org/Drop_Caches

       Setting "whattodrop" to 3 should drop everything.

       This automatically calls sync(2) before the operation, so that the maximum guest memory is
       freed.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.18)

   guestfs_du
	int64_t
	guestfs_du (guestfs_h *g,
		    const char *path);

       This command runs the "du -s" command to estimate file space usage for "path".

       "path" can be a file or a directory.  If "path" is a directory then the estimate includes
       the contents of the directory and all subdirectories (recursively).

       The result is the estimated size in kilobytes (ie. units of 1024 bytes).

       On error this function returns -1.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.54)

   guestfs_e2fsck
	int
	guestfs_e2fsck (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *device,
			...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_E2FSCK_CORRECT, int correct,
	GUESTFS_E2FSCK_FORCEALL, int forceall,

       This runs the ext2/ext3 filesystem checker on "device".	It can take the following
       optional arguments:

       "correct"
	   Automatically repair the file system. This option will cause e2fsck to automatically
	   fix any filesystem problems that can be safely fixed without human intervention.

	   This option may not be specified at the same time as the "forceall" option.

       "forceall"
	   Assume an answer of 'yes' to all questions; allows e2fsck to be used non-
	   interactively.

	   This option may not be specified at the same time as the "correct" option.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.15.17)

   guestfs_e2fsck_va
	int
	guestfs_e2fsck_va (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *device,
			   va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_e2fsck".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_e2fsck_argv
	int
	guestfs_e2fsck_argv (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *device,
			     const struct guestfs_e2fsck_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_e2fsck".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_e2fsck_f
	int
	guestfs_e2fsck_f (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *device);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_e2fsck" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This runs "e2fsck -p -f device", ie. runs the ext2/ext3 filesystem checker on "device",
       noninteractively (-p), even if the filesystem appears to be clean (-f).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.29)

   guestfs_echo_daemon
	char *
	guestfs_echo_daemon (guestfs_h *g,
			     char *const *words);

       This command concatenates the list of "words" passed with single spaces between them and
       returns the resulting string.

       You can use this command to test the connection through to the daemon.

       See also "guestfs_ping_daemon".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.69)

   guestfs_egrep
	char **
	guestfs_egrep (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *regex,
		       const char *path);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_grep" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This calls the external "egrep" program and returns the matching lines.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_egrepi
	char **
	guestfs_egrepi (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *regex,
			const char *path);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_grep" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This calls the external "egrep -i" program and returns the matching lines.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_equal
	int
	guestfs_equal (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *file1,
		       const char *file2);

       This compares the two files "file1" and "file2" and returns true if their content is
       exactly equal, or false otherwise.

       The external cmp(1) program is used for the comparison.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.18)

   guestfs_exists
	int
	guestfs_exists (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *path);

       This returns "true" if and only if there is a file, directory (or anything) with the given
       "path" name.

       See also "guestfs_is_file", "guestfs_is_dir", "guestfs_stat".

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_extlinux
	int
	guestfs_extlinux (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *directory);

       Install the SYSLINUX bootloader on the device mounted at "directory".  Unlike
       "guestfs_syslinux" which requires a FAT filesystem, this can be used on an ext2/3/4 or
       btrfs filesystem.

       The "directory" parameter can be either a mountpoint, or a directory within the
       mountpoint.

       You also have to mark the partition as "active" ("guestfs_part_set_bootable") and a Master
       Boot Record must be installed (eg. using "guestfs_pwrite_device") on the first sector of
       the whole disk.	The SYSLINUX package comes with some suitable Master Boot Records.  See
       the extlinux(1) man page for further information.

       Additional configuration can be supplied to SYSLINUX by placing a file called
       "extlinux.conf" on the filesystem under "directory".  For further information about the
       contents of this file, see extlinux(1).

       See also "guestfs_syslinux".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.21.27)

   guestfs_fallocate
	int
	guestfs_fallocate (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *path,
			   int len);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_fallocate64" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This command preallocates a file (containing zero bytes) named "path" of size "len" bytes.
       If the file exists already, it is overwritten.

       Do not confuse this with the guestfish-specific "alloc" command which allocates a file in
       the host and attaches it as a device.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_fallocate64
	int
	guestfs_fallocate64 (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *path,
			     int64_t len);

       This command preallocates a file (containing zero bytes) named "path" of size "len" bytes.
       If the file exists already, it is overwritten.

       Note that this call allocates disk blocks for the file.	To create a sparse file use
       "guestfs_truncate_size" instead.

       The deprecated call "guestfs_fallocate" does the same, but owing to an oversight it only
       allowed 30 bit lengths to be specified, effectively limiting the maximum size of files
       created through that call to 1GB.

       Do not confuse this with the guestfish-specific "alloc" and "sparse" commands which create
       a file in the host and attach it as a device.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.17)

   guestfs_feature_available
	int
	guestfs_feature_available (guestfs_h *g,
				   char *const *groups);

       This is the same as "guestfs_available", but unlike that call it returns a simple
       true/false boolean result, instead of throwing an exception if a feature is not found.
       For other documentation see "guestfs_available".

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.21.26)

   guestfs_fgrep
	char **
	guestfs_fgrep (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *pattern,
		       const char *path);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_grep" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This calls the external "fgrep" program and returns the matching lines.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_fgrepi
	char **
	guestfs_fgrepi (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *pattern,
			const char *path);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_grep" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This calls the external "fgrep -i" program and returns the matching lines.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_file
	char *
	guestfs_file (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *path);

       This call uses the standard file(1) command to determine the type or contents of the file.

       This call will also transparently look inside various types of compressed file.

       The exact command which runs is "file -zb path".  Note in particular that the filename is
       not prepended to the output (the -b option).

       The output depends on the output of the underlying file(1) command and it can change in
       future in ways beyond our control.  In other words, the output is not guaranteed by the
       ABI.

       See also: file(1), "guestfs_vfs_type", "guestfs_lstat", "guestfs_is_file",
       "guestfs_is_blockdev" (etc), "guestfs_is_zero".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 0.9.1)

   guestfs_file_architecture
	char *
	guestfs_file_architecture (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *filename);

       This detects the architecture of the binary "filename", and returns it if known.

       Currently defined architectures are:

       "i386"
	   This string is returned for all 32 bit i386, i486, i586, i686 binaries irrespective of
	   the precise processor requirements of the binary.

       "x86_64"
	   64 bit x86-64.

       "sparc"
	   32 bit SPARC.

       "sparc64"
	   64 bit SPARC V9 and above.

       "ia64"
	   Intel Itanium.

       "ppc"
	   32 bit Power PC.

       "ppc64"
	   64 bit Power PC.

       Libguestfs may return other architecture strings in future.

       The function works on at least the following types of files:

       o   many types of Un*x and Linux binary

       o   many types of Un*x and Linux shared library

       o   Windows Win32 and Win64 binaries

       o   Windows Win32 and Win64 DLLs

	   Win32 binaries and DLLs return "i386".

	   Win64 binaries and DLLs return "x86_64".

       o   Linux kernel modules

       o   Linux new-style initrd images

       o   some non-x86 Linux vmlinuz kernels

       What it can't do currently:

       o   static libraries (libfoo.a)

       o   Linux old-style initrd as compressed ext2 filesystem (RHEL 3)

       o   x86 Linux vmlinuz kernels

	   x86 vmlinuz images (bzImage format) consist of a mix of 16-, 32- and compressed code,
	   and are horribly hard to unpack.  If you want to find the architecture of a kernel,
	   use the architecture of the associated initrd or kernel module(s) instead.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.5.3)

   guestfs_filesize
	int64_t
	guestfs_filesize (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *file);

       This command returns the size of "file" in bytes.

       To get other stats about a file, use "guestfs_stat", "guestfs_lstat", "guestfs_is_dir",
       "guestfs_is_file" etc.  To get the size of block devices, use
       "guestfs_blockdev_getsize64".

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.0.82)

   guestfs_filesystem_available
	int
	guestfs_filesystem_available (guestfs_h *g,
				      const char *filesystem);

       Check whether libguestfs supports the named filesystem.	The argument "filesystem" is a
       filesystem name, such as "ext3".

       You must call "guestfs_launch" before using this command.

       This is mainly useful as a negative test.  If this returns true, it doesn't mean that a
       particular filesystem can be created or mounted, since filesystems can fail for other
       reasons such as it being a later version of the filesystem, or having incompatible
       features, or lacking the right mkfs.<fs> tool.

       See also "guestfs_available", "guestfs_feature_available", "AVAILABILITY" in guestfs(3).

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.5)

   guestfs_fill
	int
	guestfs_fill (guestfs_h *g,
		      int c,
		      int len,
		      const char *path);

       This command creates a new file called "path".  The initial content of the file is "len"
       octets of "c", where "c" must be a number in the range "[0..255]".

       To fill a file with zero bytes (sparsely), it is much more efficient to use
       "guestfs_truncate_size".  To create a file with a pattern of repeating bytes use
       "guestfs_fill_pattern".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.79)

   guestfs_fill_dir
	int
	guestfs_fill_dir (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *dir,
			  int nr);

       This function, useful for testing filesystems, creates "nr" empty files in the directory
       "dir" with names 00000000 through "nr-1" (ie. each file name is 8 digits long padded with
       zeroes).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.32)

   guestfs_fill_pattern
	int
	guestfs_fill_pattern (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *pattern,
			      int len,
			      const char *path);

       This function is like "guestfs_fill" except that it creates a new file of length "len"
       containing the repeating pattern of bytes in "pattern".	The pattern is truncated if
       necessary to ensure the length of the file is exactly "len" bytes.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.3.12)

   guestfs_find
	char **
	guestfs_find (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *directory);

       This command lists out all files and directories, recursively, starting at "directory".
       It is essentially equivalent to running the shell command "find directory -print" but some
       post-processing happens on the output, described below.

       This returns a list of strings without any prefix.  Thus if the directory structure was:

	/tmp/a
	/tmp/b
	/tmp/c/d

       then the returned list from "guestfs_find" "/tmp" would be 4 elements:

	a
	b
	c
	c/d

       If "directory" is not a directory, then this command returns an error.

       The returned list is sorted.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.0.27)

   guestfs_find0
	int
	guestfs_find0 (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *directory,
		       const char *files);

       This command lists out all files and directories, recursively, starting at "directory",
       placing the resulting list in the external file called "files".

       This command works the same way as "guestfs_find" with the following exceptions:

       o   The resulting list is written to an external file.

       o   Items (filenames) in the result are separated by "\0" characters.  See find(1) option
	   -print0.

       o   The result list is not sorted.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.74)

   guestfs_findfs_label
	char *
	guestfs_findfs_label (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *label);

       This command searches the filesystems and returns the one which has the given label.  An
       error is returned if no such filesystem can be found.

       To find the label of a filesystem, use "guestfs_vfs_label".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.5.3)

   guestfs_findfs_uuid
	char *
	guestfs_findfs_uuid (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *uuid);

       This command searches the filesystems and returns the one which has the given UUID.  An
       error is returned if no such filesystem can be found.

       To find the UUID of a filesystem, use "guestfs_vfs_uuid".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.5.3)

   guestfs_fsck
	int
	guestfs_fsck (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *fstype,
		      const char *device);

       This runs the filesystem checker (fsck) on "device" which should have filesystem type
       "fstype".

       The returned integer is the status.  See fsck(8) for the list of status codes from "fsck".

       Notes:

       o   Multiple status codes can be summed together.

       o   A non-zero return code can mean "success", for example if errors have been corrected
	   on the filesystem.

       o   Checking or repairing NTFS volumes is not supported (by linux-ntfs).

       This command is entirely equivalent to running "fsck -a -t fstype device".

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.0.16)

   guestfs_fstrim
	int
	guestfs_fstrim (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *mountpoint,
			...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_FSTRIM_OFFSET, int64_t offset,
	GUESTFS_FSTRIM_LENGTH, int64_t length,
	GUESTFS_FSTRIM_MINIMUMFREEEXTENT, int64_t minimumfreeextent,

       Trim the free space in the filesystem mounted on "mountpoint".  The filesystem must be
       mounted read-write.

       The filesystem contents are not affected, but any free space in the filesystem is
       "trimmed", that is, given back to the host device, thus making disk images more sparse,
       allowing unused space in qcow2 files to be reused, etc.

       This operation requires support in libguestfs, the mounted filesystem, the host
       filesystem, qemu and the host kernel.  If this support isn't present it may give an error
       or even appear to run but do nothing.

       See also "guestfs_zero_free_space".  That is a slightly different operation that turns
       free space in the filesystem into zeroes.  It is valid to call "guestfs_fstrim" either
       instead of, or after calling "guestfs_zero_free_space".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.6)

   guestfs_fstrim_va
	int
	guestfs_fstrim_va (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *mountpoint,
			   va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_fstrim".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_fstrim_argv
	int
	guestfs_fstrim_argv (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *mountpoint,
			     const struct guestfs_fstrim_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_fstrim".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_get_append
	const char *
	guestfs_get_append (guestfs_h *g);

       Return the additional kernel options which are added to the guest kernel command line.

       If "NULL" then no options are added.

       This function returns a string which may be NULL.  There is no way to return an error from
       this function.  The string is owned by the guest handle and must not be freed.

       (Added in 1.0.26)

   guestfs_get_attach_method
	char *
	guestfs_get_attach_method (guestfs_h *g);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_get_backend" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       Return the current backend.

       See "guestfs_set_backend" and "BACKEND" in guestfs(3).

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.9.8)

   guestfs_get_autosync
	int
	guestfs_get_autosync (guestfs_h *g);

       Get the autosync flag.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_get_backend
	char *
	guestfs_get_backend (guestfs_h *g);

       Return the current backend.

       This handle property was previously called the "attach method".

       See "guestfs_set_backend" and "BACKEND" in guestfs(3).

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.21.26)

   guestfs_get_cachedir
	char *
	guestfs_get_cachedir (guestfs_h *g);

       Get the directory used by the handle to store the appliance cache.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.19.58)

   guestfs_get_direct
	int
	guestfs_get_direct (guestfs_h *g);

       Return the direct appliance mode flag.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.72)

   guestfs_get_e2attrs
	char *
	guestfs_get_e2attrs (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *file);

       This returns the file attributes associated with "file".

       The attributes are a set of bits associated with each inode which affect the behaviour of
       the file.  The attributes are returned as a string of letters (described below).  The
       string may be empty, indicating that no file attributes are set for this file.

       These attributes are only present when the file is located on an ext2/3/4 filesystem.
       Using this call on other filesystem types will result in an error.

       The characters (file attributes) in the returned string are currently:

       'A' When the file is accessed, its atime is not modified.

       'a' The file is append-only.

       'c' The file is compressed on-disk.

       'D' (Directories only.)	Changes to this directory are written synchronously to disk.

       'd' The file is not a candidate for backup (see dump(8)).

       'E' The file has compression errors.

       'e' The file is using extents.

       'h' The file is storing its blocks in units of the filesystem blocksize instead of
	   sectors.

       'I' (Directories only.)	The directory is using hashed trees.

       'i' The file is immutable.  It cannot be modified, deleted or renamed.  No link can be
	   created to this file.

       'j' The file is data-journaled.

       's' When the file is deleted, all its blocks will be zeroed.

       'S' Changes to this file are written synchronously to disk.

       'T' (Directories only.)	This is a hint to the block allocator that subdirectories
	   contained in this directory should be spread across blocks.	If not present, the block
	   allocator will try to group subdirectories together.

       't' For a file, this disables tail-merging.  (Not used by upstream implementations of
	   ext2.)

       'u' When the file is deleted, its blocks will be saved, allowing the file to be undeleted.

       'X' The raw contents of the compressed file may be accessed.

       'Z' The compressed file is dirty.

       More file attributes may be added to this list later.  Not all file attributes may be set
       for all kinds of files.	For detailed information, consult the chattr(1) man page.

       See also "guestfs_set_e2attrs".

       Don't confuse these attributes with extended attributes (see "guestfs_getxattr").

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.17.31)

   guestfs_get_e2generation
	int64_t
	guestfs_get_e2generation (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *file);

       This returns the ext2 file generation of a file.  The generation (which used to be called
       the "version") is a number associated with an inode.  This is most commonly used by NFS
       servers.

       The generation is only present when the file is located on an ext2/3/4 filesystem.  Using
       this call on other filesystem types will result in an error.

       See "guestfs_set_e2generation".

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.17.31)

   guestfs_get_e2label
	char *
	guestfs_get_e2label (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *device);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_vfs_label" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This returns the ext2/3/4 filesystem label of the filesystem on "device".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.15)

   guestfs_get_e2uuid
	char *
	guestfs_get_e2uuid (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *device);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_vfs_uuid" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This returns the ext2/3/4 filesystem UUID of the filesystem on "device".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.15)

   guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credential_challenge
	char *
	guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credential_challenge (guestfs_h *g,
							    int index);

       Get the challenge (provided by libvirt) for the "index"'th requested credential.  If
       libvirt did not provide a challenge, this returns the empty string "".

       See "LIBVIRT AUTHENTICATION" in guestfs(3) for documentation and example code.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.19.52)

   guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credential_defresult
	char *
	guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credential_defresult (guestfs_h *g,
							    int index);

       Get the default result (provided by libvirt) for the "index"'th requested credential.  If
       libvirt did not provide a default result, this returns the empty string "".

       See "LIBVIRT AUTHENTICATION" in guestfs(3) for documentation and example code.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.19.52)

   guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credential_prompt
	char *
	guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credential_prompt (guestfs_h *g,
							 int index);

       Get the prompt (provided by libvirt) for the "index"'th requested credential.  If libvirt
       did not provide a prompt, this returns the empty string "".

       See "LIBVIRT AUTHENTICATION" in guestfs(3) for documentation and example code.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.19.52)

   guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credentials
	char **
	guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credentials (guestfs_h *g);

       This should only be called during the event callback for events of type
       "GUESTFS_EVENT_LIBVIRT_AUTH".

       Return the list of credentials requested by libvirt.  Possible values are a subset of the
       strings provided when you called "guestfs_set_libvirt_supported_credentials".

       See "LIBVIRT AUTHENTICATION" in guestfs(3) for documentation and example code.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.19.52)

   guestfs_get_memsize
	int
	guestfs_get_memsize (guestfs_h *g);

       This gets the memory size in megabytes allocated to the qemu subprocess.

       If "guestfs_set_memsize" was not called on this handle, and if "LIBGUESTFS_MEMSIZE" was
       not set, then this returns the compiled-in default value for memsize.

       For more information on the architecture of libguestfs, see guestfs(3).

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.0.55)

   guestfs_get_network
	int
	guestfs_get_network (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns the enable network flag.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.5.4)

   guestfs_get_path
	const char *
	guestfs_get_path (guestfs_h *g);

       Return the current search path.

       This is always non-NULL.  If it wasn't set already, then this will return the default
       path.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The string is owned by the guest handle
       and must not be freed.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_get_pgroup
	int
	guestfs_get_pgroup (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns the process group flag.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.11.18)

   guestfs_get_pid
	int
	guestfs_get_pid (guestfs_h *g);

       Return the process ID of the qemu subprocess.  If there is no qemu subprocess, then this
       will return an error.

       This is an internal call used for debugging and testing.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.0.56)

   guestfs_get_program
	const char *
	guestfs_get_program (guestfs_h *g);

       Get the program name.  See "guestfs_set_program".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The string is owned by the guest handle
       and must not be freed.

       (Added in 1.21.29)

   guestfs_get_qemu
	const char *
	guestfs_get_qemu (guestfs_h *g);

       Return the current qemu binary.

       This is always non-NULL.  If it wasn't set already, then this will return the default qemu
       binary name.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The string is owned by the guest handle
       and must not be freed.

       (Added in 1.0.6)

   guestfs_get_recovery_proc
	int
	guestfs_get_recovery_proc (guestfs_h *g);

       Return the recovery process enabled flag.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.77)

   guestfs_get_selinux
	int
	guestfs_get_selinux (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns the current setting of the selinux flag which is passed to the appliance at
       boot time.  See "guestfs_set_selinux".

       For more information on the architecture of libguestfs, see guestfs(3).

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.67)

   guestfs_get_smp
	int
	guestfs_get_smp (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns the number of virtual CPUs assigned to the appliance.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.13.15)

   guestfs_get_state
	int
	guestfs_get_state (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns the current state as an opaque integer.  This is only useful for printing
       debug and internal error messages.

       For more information on states, see guestfs(3).

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.0.2)

   guestfs_get_tmpdir
	char *
	guestfs_get_tmpdir (guestfs_h *g);

       Get the directory used by the handle to store temporary files.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.19.58)

   guestfs_get_trace
	int
	guestfs_get_trace (guestfs_h *g);

       Return the command trace flag.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.69)

   guestfs_get_umask
	int
	guestfs_get_umask (guestfs_h *g);

       Return the current umask.  By default the umask is 022 unless it has been set by calling
       "guestfs_umask".

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.3.4)

   guestfs_get_verbose
	int
	guestfs_get_verbose (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns the verbose messages flag.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_getcon
	char *
	guestfs_getcon (guestfs_h *g);

       This gets the SELinux security context of the daemon.

       See the documentation about SELINUX in guestfs(3), and "guestfs_setcon"

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.67)

   guestfs_getxattr
	char *
	guestfs_getxattr (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *path,
			  const char *name,
			  size_t *size_r);

       Get a single extended attribute from file "path" named "name".  This call follows
       symlinks.  If you want to lookup an extended attribute for the symlink itself, use
       "guestfs_lgetxattr".

       Normally it is better to get all extended attributes from a file in one go by calling
       "guestfs_getxattrs".  However some Linux filesystem implementations are buggy and do not
       provide a way to list out attributes.  For these filesystems (notably ntfs-3g) you have to
       know the names of the extended attributes you want in advance and call this function.

       Extended attribute values are blobs of binary data.  If there is no extended attribute
       named "name", this returns an error.

       See also: "guestfs_getxattrs", "guestfs_lgetxattr", attr(5).

       This function returns a buffer, or NULL on error.  The size of the returned buffer is
       written to *size_r.  The caller must free the returned buffer after use.

       (Added in 1.7.24)

   guestfs_getxattrs
	struct guestfs_xattr_list *
	guestfs_getxattrs (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *path);

       This call lists the extended attributes of the file or directory "path".

       At the system call level, this is a combination of the listxattr(2) and getxattr(2) calls.

       See also: "guestfs_lgetxattrs", attr(5).

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_xattr_list *", or NULL if there was an error.  The
       caller must call "guestfs_free_xattr_list" after use.

       (Added in 1.0.59)

   guestfs_glob_expand
	char **
	guestfs_glob_expand (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *pattern);

       This command searches for all the pathnames matching "pattern" according to the wildcard
       expansion rules used by the shell.

       If no paths match, then this returns an empty list (note: not an error).

       It is just a wrapper around the C glob(3) function with flags "GLOB_MARK|GLOB_BRACE".  See
       that manual page for more details.

       Notice that there is no equivalent command for expanding a device name (eg. "/dev/sd*").
       Use "guestfs_list_devices", "guestfs_list_partitions" etc functions instead.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.0.50)

   guestfs_grep
	char **
	guestfs_grep (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *regex,
		      const char *path);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_grep_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_grep_opts
	char **
	guestfs_grep_opts (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *regex,
			   const char *path,
			   ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_GREP_OPTS_EXTENDED, int extended,
	GUESTFS_GREP_OPTS_FIXED, int fixed,
	GUESTFS_GREP_OPTS_INSENSITIVE, int insensitive,
	GUESTFS_GREP_OPTS_COMPRESSED, int compressed,

       This calls the external "grep" program and returns the matching lines.

       The optional flags are:

       "extended"
	   Use extended regular expressions.  This is the same as using the -E flag.

       "fixed"
	   Match fixed (don't use regular expressions).  This is the same as using the -F flag.

       "insensitive"
	   Match case-insensitive.  This is the same as using the -i flag.

       "compressed"
	   Use "zgrep" instead of "grep".  This allows the input to be compress- or gzip-
	   compressed.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.19.28)

   guestfs_grep_opts_va
	char **
	guestfs_grep_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *regex,
			      const char *path,
			      va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_grep_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_grep_opts_argv
	char **
	guestfs_grep_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *regex,
				const char *path,
				const struct guestfs_grep_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_grep_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_grepi
	char **
	guestfs_grepi (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *regex,
		       const char *path);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_grep" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This calls the external "grep -i" program and returns the matching lines.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_grub_install
	int
	guestfs_grub_install (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *root,
			      const char *device);

       This command installs GRUB 1 (the Grand Unified Bootloader) on "device", with the root
       directory being "root".

       Notes:

       o   There is currently no way in the API to install grub2, which is used by most modern
	   Linux guests.  It is possible to run the grub2 command from the guest, although see
	   the caveats in "RUNNING COMMANDS" in guestfs(3).

       o   This uses "grub-install" from the host.  Unfortunately grub is not always compatible
	   with itself, so this only works in rather narrow circumstances.  Careful testing with
	   each guest version is advisable.

       o   If grub-install reports the error "No suitable drive was found in the generated device
	   map."  it may be that you need to create a "/boot/grub/device.map" file first that
	   contains the mapping between grub device names and Linux device names.  It is usually
	   sufficient to create a file containing:

	    (hd0) /dev/vda

	   replacing "/dev/vda" with the name of the installation device.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.17)

   guestfs_head
	char **
	guestfs_head (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *path);

       This command returns up to the first 10 lines of a file as a list of strings.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.54)

   guestfs_head_n
	char **
	guestfs_head_n (guestfs_h *g,
			int nrlines,
			const char *path);

       If the parameter "nrlines" is a positive number, this returns the first "nrlines" lines of
       the file "path".

       If the parameter "nrlines" is a negative number, this returns lines from the file "path",
       excluding the last "nrlines" lines.

       If the parameter "nrlines" is zero, this returns an empty list.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.54)

   guestfs_hexdump
	char *
	guestfs_hexdump (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *path);

       This runs "hexdump -C" on the given "path".  The result is the human-readable, canonical
       hex dump of the file.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.22)

   guestfs_hivex_close
	int
	guestfs_hivex_close (guestfs_h *g);

       Close the current hivex handle.

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_commit
	int
	guestfs_hivex_commit (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *filename);

       Commit (write) changes to the hive.

       If the optional "filename" parameter is null, then the changes are written back to the
       same hive that was opened.  If this is not null then they are written to the alternate
       filename given and the original hive is left untouched.

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_node_add_child
	int64_t
	guestfs_hivex_node_add_child (guestfs_h *g,
				      int64_t parent,
				      const char *name);

       Add a child node to "parent" named "name".

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_node_children
	struct guestfs_hivex_node_list *
	guestfs_hivex_node_children (guestfs_h *g,
				     int64_t nodeh);

       Return the list of nodes which are subkeys of "nodeh".

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_hivex_node_list *", or NULL if there was an error.
       The caller must call "guestfs_free_hivex_node_list" after use.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_node_delete_child
	int
	guestfs_hivex_node_delete_child (guestfs_h *g,
					 int64_t nodeh);

       Delete "nodeh", recursively if necessary.

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_node_get_child
	int64_t
	guestfs_hivex_node_get_child (guestfs_h *g,
				      int64_t nodeh,
				      const char *name);

       Return the child of "nodeh" with the name "name", if it exists.	This can return 0 meaning
       the name was not found.

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_node_get_value
	int64_t
	guestfs_hivex_node_get_value (guestfs_h *g,
				      int64_t nodeh,
				      const char *key);

       Return the value attached to "nodeh" which has the name "key", if it exists.  This can
       return 0 meaning the key was not found.

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_node_name
	char *
	guestfs_hivex_node_name (guestfs_h *g,
				 int64_t nodeh);

       Return the name of "nodeh".

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_node_parent
	int64_t
	guestfs_hivex_node_parent (guestfs_h *g,
				   int64_t nodeh);

       Return the parent node of "nodeh".

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_node_set_value
	int
	guestfs_hivex_node_set_value (guestfs_h *g,
				      int64_t nodeh,
				      const char *key,
				      int64_t t,
				      const char *val,
				      size_t val_size);

       Set or replace a single value under the node "nodeh".  The "key" is the name, "t" is the
       type, and "val" is the data.

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_node_values
	struct guestfs_hivex_value_list *
	guestfs_hivex_node_values (guestfs_h *g,
				   int64_t nodeh);

       Return the array of (key, datatype, data) tuples attached to "nodeh".

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_hivex_value_list *", or NULL if there was an
       error.  The caller must call "guestfs_free_hivex_value_list" after use.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_open
	int
	guestfs_hivex_open (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *filename,
			    ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_HIVEX_OPEN_VERBOSE, int verbose,
	GUESTFS_HIVEX_OPEN_DEBUG, int debug,
	GUESTFS_HIVEX_OPEN_WRITE, int write,

       Open the Windows Registry hive file named "filename".  If there was any previous hivex
       handle associated with this guestfs session, then it is closed.

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_open_va
	int
	guestfs_hivex_open_va (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *filename,
			       va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_hivex_open".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_hivex_open_argv
	int
	guestfs_hivex_open_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *filename,
				 const struct guestfs_hivex_open_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_hivex_open".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_hivex_root
	int64_t
	guestfs_hivex_root (guestfs_h *g);

       Return the root node of the hive.

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_value_key
	char *
	guestfs_hivex_value_key (guestfs_h *g,
				 int64_t valueh);

       Return the key (name) field of a (key, datatype, data) tuple.

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_value_type
	int64_t
	guestfs_hivex_value_type (guestfs_h *g,
				  int64_t valueh);

       Return the data type field from a (key, datatype, data) tuple.

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_value_utf8
	char *
	guestfs_hivex_value_utf8 (guestfs_h *g,
				  int64_t valueh);

       This calls "guestfs_hivex_value_value" (which returns the data field from a hivex value
       tuple).	It then assumes that the field is a UTF-16LE string and converts the result to
       UTF-8 (or if this is not possible, it returns an error).

       This is useful for reading strings out of the Windows registry.	However it is not
       foolproof because the registry is not strongly-typed and fields can contain arbitrary or
       unexpected data.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_hivex_value_value
	char *
	guestfs_hivex_value_value (guestfs_h *g,
				   int64_t valueh,
				   size_t *size_r);

       Return the data field of a (key, datatype, data) tuple.

       This is a wrapper around the hivex(3) call of the same name.

       See also: "guestfs_hivex_value_utf8".

       This function returns a buffer, or NULL on error.  The size of the returned buffer is
       written to *size_r.  The caller must free the returned buffer after use.

       (Added in 1.19.35)

   guestfs_initrd_cat
	char *
	guestfs_initrd_cat (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *initrdpath,
			    const char *filename,
			    size_t *size_r);

       This command unpacks the file "filename" from the initrd file called "initrdpath".  The
       filename must be given without the initial "/" character.

       For example, in guestfish you could use the following command to examine the boot script
       (usually called "/init") contained in a Linux initrd or initramfs image:

	initrd-cat /boot/initrd-<version>.img init

       See also "guestfs_initrd_list".

       This function returns a buffer, or NULL on error.  The size of the returned buffer is
       written to *size_r.  The caller must free the returned buffer after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.84)

   guestfs_initrd_list
	char **
	guestfs_initrd_list (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *path);

       This command lists out files contained in an initrd.

       The files are listed without any initial "/" character.	The files are listed in the order
       they appear (not necessarily alphabetical).  Directory names are listed as separate items.

       Old Linux kernels (2.4 and earlier) used a compressed ext2 filesystem as initrd.  We only
       support the newer initramfs format (compressed cpio files).

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.0.54)

   guestfs_inotify_add_watch
	int64_t
	guestfs_inotify_add_watch (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *path,
				   int mask);

       Watch "path" for the events listed in "mask".

       Note that if "path" is a directory then events within that directory are watched, but this
       does not happen recursively (in subdirectories).

       Note for non-C or non-Linux callers: the inotify events are defined by the Linux kernel
       ABI and are listed in "/usr/include/sys/inotify.h".

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_inotify_close
	int
	guestfs_inotify_close (guestfs_h *g);

       This closes the inotify handle which was previously opened by inotify_init.  It removes
       all watches, throws away any pending events, and deallocates all resources.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_inotify_files
	char **
	guestfs_inotify_files (guestfs_h *g);

       This function is a helpful wrapper around "guestfs_inotify_read" which just returns a list
       of pathnames of objects that were touched.  The returned pathnames are sorted and
       deduplicated.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_inotify_init
	int
	guestfs_inotify_init (guestfs_h *g,
			      int maxevents);

       This command creates a new inotify handle.  The inotify subsystem can be used to notify
       events which happen to objects in the guest filesystem.

       "maxevents" is the maximum number of events which will be queued up between calls to
       "guestfs_inotify_read" or "guestfs_inotify_files".  If this is passed as 0, then the
       kernel (or previously set) default is used.  For Linux 2.6.29 the default was 16384
       events.	Beyond this limit, the kernel throws away events, but records the fact that it
       threw them away by setting a flag "IN_Q_OVERFLOW" in the returned structure list (see
       "guestfs_inotify_read").

       Before any events are generated, you have to add some watches to the internal watch list.
       See: "guestfs_inotify_add_watch" and "guestfs_inotify_rm_watch".

       Queued up events should be read periodically by calling "guestfs_inotify_read" (or
       "guestfs_inotify_files" which is just a helpful wrapper around "guestfs_inotify_read").
       If you don't read the events out often enough then you risk the internal queue
       overflowing.

       The handle should be closed after use by calling "guestfs_inotify_close".  This also
       removes any watches automatically.

       See also inotify(7) for an overview of the inotify interface as exposed by the Linux
       kernel, which is roughly what we expose via libguestfs.	Note that there is one global
       inotify handle per libguestfs instance.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_inotify_read
	struct guestfs_inotify_event_list *
	guestfs_inotify_read (guestfs_h *g);

       Return the complete queue of events that have happened since the previous read call.

       If no events have happened, this returns an empty list.

       Note: In order to make sure that all events have been read, you must call this function
       repeatedly until it returns an empty list.  The reason is that the call will read events
       up to the maximum appliance-to-host message size and leave remaining events in the queue.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_inotify_event_list *", or NULL if there was an
       error.  The caller must call "guestfs_free_inotify_event_list" after use.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_inotify_rm_watch
	int
	guestfs_inotify_rm_watch (guestfs_h *g,
				  int wd);

       Remove a previously defined inotify watch.  See "guestfs_inotify_add_watch".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_inspect_get_arch
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_arch (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *root);

       This returns the architecture of the inspected operating system.  The possible return
       values are listed under "guestfs_file_architecture".

       If the architecture could not be determined, then the string "unknown" is returned.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.5.3)

   guestfs_inspect_get_distro
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_distro (guestfs_h *g,
				    const char *root);

       This returns the distro (distribution) of the inspected operating system.

       Currently defined distros are:

       "archlinux"
	   Arch Linux.

       "buildroot"
	   Buildroot-derived distro, but not one we specifically recognize.

       "centos"
	   CentOS.

       "cirros"
	   Cirros.

       "debian"
	   Debian.

       "fedora"
	   Fedora.

       "freedos"
	   FreeDOS.

       "gentoo"
	   Gentoo.

       "linuxmint"
	   Linux Mint.

       "mageia"
	   Mageia.

       "mandriva"
	   Mandriva.

       "meego"
	   MeeGo.

       "openbsd"
	   OpenBSD.

       "opensuse"
	   OpenSUSE.

       "pardus"
	   Pardus.

       "redhat-based"
	   Some Red Hat-derived distro.

       "rhel"
	   Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

       "scientificlinux"
	   Scientific Linux.

       "slackware"
	   Slackware.

       "sles"
	   SuSE Linux Enterprise Server or Desktop.

       "suse-based"
	   Some openSuSE-derived distro.

       "ttylinux"
	   ttylinux.

       "ubuntu"
	   Ubuntu.

       "unknown"
	   The distro could not be determined.

       "windows"
	   Windows does not have distributions.  This string is returned if the OS type is
	   Windows.

       Future versions of libguestfs may return other strings here.  The caller should be
       prepared to handle any string.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.5.3)

   guestfs_inspect_get_drive_mappings
	char **
	guestfs_inspect_get_drive_mappings (guestfs_h *g,
					    const char *root);

       This call is useful for Windows which uses a primitive system of assigning drive letters
       (like "C:") to partitions.  This inspection API examines the Windows Registry to find out
       how disks/partitions are mapped to drive letters, and returns a hash table as in the
       example below:

	C      =>     /dev/vda2
	E      =>     /dev/vdb1
	F      =>     /dev/vdc1

       Note that keys are drive letters.  For Windows, the key is case insensitive and just
       contains the drive letter, without the customary colon separator character.

       In future we may support other operating systems that also used drive letters, but the
       keys for those might not be case insensitive and might be longer than 1 character.  For
       example in OS-9, hard drives were named "h0", "h1" etc.

       For Windows guests, currently only hard drive mappings are returned.  Removable disks (eg.
       DVD-ROMs) are ignored.

       For guests that do not use drive mappings, or if the drive mappings could not be
       determined, this returns an empty hash table.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.  See also
       "guestfs_inspect_get_mountpoints", "guestfs_inspect_get_filesystems".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings, or NULL if there was an error.
       The array of strings will always have length "2n+1", where "n" keys and values alternate,
       followed by the trailing NULL entry.  The caller must free the strings and the array after
       use.

       (Added in 1.9.17)

   guestfs_inspect_get_filesystems
	char **
	guestfs_inspect_get_filesystems (guestfs_h *g,
					 const char *root);

       This returns a list of all the filesystems that we think are associated with this
       operating system.  This includes the root filesystem, other ordinary filesystems, and non-
       mounted devices like swap partitions.

       In the case of a multi-boot virtual machine, it is possible for a filesystem to be shared
       between operating systems.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.  See also
       "guestfs_inspect_get_mountpoints".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.5.3)

   guestfs_inspect_get_format
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_format (guestfs_h *g,
				    const char *root);

       This returns the format of the inspected operating system.  You can use it to detect
       install images, live CDs and similar.

       Currently defined formats are:

       "installed"
	   This is an installed operating system.

       "installer"
	   The disk image being inspected is not an installed operating system, but a bootable
	   install disk, live CD, or similar.

       "unknown"
	   The format of this disk image is not known.

       Future versions of libguestfs may return other strings here.  The caller should be
       prepared to handle any string.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.9.4)

   guestfs_inspect_get_hostname
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_hostname (guestfs_h *g,
				      const char *root);

       This function returns the hostname of the operating system as found by inspection of the
       guest's configuration files.

       If the hostname could not be determined, then the string "unknown" is returned.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.7.9)

   guestfs_inspect_get_icon
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_icon (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *root,
				  size_t *size_r,
				  ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_INSPECT_GET_ICON_FAVICON, int favicon,
	GUESTFS_INSPECT_GET_ICON_HIGHQUALITY, int highquality,

       This function returns an icon corresponding to the inspected operating system.  The icon
       is returned as a buffer containing a PNG image (re-encoded to PNG if necessary).

       If it was not possible to get an icon this function returns a zero-length (non-NULL)
       buffer.	Callers must check for this case.

       Libguestfs will start by looking for a file called "/etc/favicon.png" or
       "C:\etc\favicon.png" and if it has the correct format, the contents of this file will be
       returned.  You can disable favicons by passing the optional "favicon" boolean as false
       (default is true).

       If finding the favicon fails, then we look in other places in the guest for a suitable
       icon.

       If the optional "highquality" boolean is true then only high quality icons are returned,
       which means only icons of high resolution with an alpha channel.  The default (false) is
       to return any icon we can, even if it is of substandard quality.

       Notes:

       o   Unlike most other inspection API calls, the guest's disks must be mounted up before
	   you call this, since it needs to read information from the guest filesystem during the
	   call.

       o   Security: The icon data comes from the untrusted guest, and should be treated with
	   caution.  PNG files have been known to contain exploits.  Ensure that libpng (or other
	   relevant libraries) are fully up to date before trying to process or display the icon.

       o   The PNG image returned can be any size.  It might not be square.  Libguestfs tries to
	   return the largest, highest quality icon available.	The application must scale the
	   icon to the required size.

       o   Extracting icons from Windows guests requires the external "wrestool" program from the
	   "icoutils" package, and several programs ("bmptopnm", "pnmtopng", "pamcut") from the
	   "netpbm" package.  These must be installed separately.

       o   Operating system icons are usually trademarks.  Seek legal advice before using
	   trademarks in applications.

       This function returns a buffer, or NULL on error.  The size of the returned buffer is
       written to *size_r.  The caller must free the returned buffer after use.

       (Added in 1.11.12)

   guestfs_inspect_get_icon_va
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_icon_va (guestfs_h *g,
				     const char *root,
				     size_t *size_r,
				     va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_inspect_get_icon".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_inspect_get_icon_argv
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_icon_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				       const char *root,
				       size_t *size_r,
				       const struct guestfs_inspect_get_icon_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_inspect_get_icon".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_inspect_get_major_version
	int
	guestfs_inspect_get_major_version (guestfs_h *g,
					   const char *root);

       This returns the major version number of the inspected operating system.

       Windows uses a consistent versioning scheme which is not reflected in the popular public
       names used by the operating system.  Notably the operating system known as "Windows 7" is
       really version 6.1 (ie. major = 6, minor = 1).  You can find out the real versions
       corresponding to releases of Windows by consulting Wikipedia or MSDN.

       If the version could not be determined, then 0 is returned.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.5.3)

   guestfs_inspect_get_minor_version
	int
	guestfs_inspect_get_minor_version (guestfs_h *g,
					   const char *root);

       This returns the minor version number of the inspected operating system.

       If the version could not be determined, then 0 is returned.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.  See also
       "guestfs_inspect_get_major_version".

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.5.3)

   guestfs_inspect_get_mountpoints
	char **
	guestfs_inspect_get_mountpoints (guestfs_h *g,
					 const char *root);

       This returns a hash of where we think the filesystems associated with this operating
       system should be mounted.  Callers should note that this is at best an educated guess made
       by reading configuration files such as "/etc/fstab".  In particular note that this may
       return filesystems which are non-existent or not mountable and callers should be prepared
       to handle or ignore failures if they try to mount them.

       Each element in the returned hashtable has a key which is the path of the mountpoint (eg.
       "/boot") and a value which is the filesystem that would be mounted there (eg.
       "/dev/sda1").

       Non-mounted devices such as swap devices are not returned in this list.

       For operating systems like Windows which still use drive letters, this call will only
       return an entry for the first drive "mounted on" "/".  For information about the mapping
       of drive letters to partitions, see "guestfs_inspect_get_drive_mappings".

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.  See also
       "guestfs_inspect_get_filesystems".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings, or NULL if there was an error.
       The array of strings will always have length "2n+1", where "n" keys and values alternate,
       followed by the trailing NULL entry.  The caller must free the strings and the array after
       use.

       (Added in 1.5.3)

   guestfs_inspect_get_package_format
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_package_format (guestfs_h *g,
					    const char *root);

       This function and "guestfs_inspect_get_package_management" return the package format and
       package management tool used by the inspected operating system.	For example for Fedora
       these functions would return "rpm" (package format) and "yum" (package management).

       This returns the string "unknown" if we could not determine the package format or if the
       operating system does not have a real packaging system (eg. Windows).

       Possible strings include: "rpm", "deb", "ebuild", "pisi", "pacman", "pkgsrc".  Future
       versions of libguestfs may return other strings.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.7.5)

   guestfs_inspect_get_package_management
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_package_management (guestfs_h *g,
						const char *root);

       "guestfs_inspect_get_package_format" and this function return the package format and
       package management tool used by the inspected operating system.	For example for Fedora
       these functions would return "rpm" (package format) and "yum" (package management).

       This returns the string "unknown" if we could not determine the package management tool or
       if the operating system does not have a real packaging system (eg. Windows).

       Possible strings include: "yum", "up2date", "apt" (for all Debian derivatives), "portage",
       "pisi", "pacman", "urpmi", "zypper".  Future versions of libguestfs may return other
       strings.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.7.5)

   guestfs_inspect_get_product_name
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_product_name (guestfs_h *g,
					  const char *root);

       This returns the product name of the inspected operating system.  The product name is
       generally some freeform string which can be displayed to the user, but should not be
       parsed by programs.

       If the product name could not be determined, then the string "unknown" is returned.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.5.3)

   guestfs_inspect_get_product_variant
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_product_variant (guestfs_h *g,
					     const char *root);

       This returns the product variant of the inspected operating system.

       For Windows guests, this returns the contents of the Registry key
       "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion" "InstallationType" which is usually a
       string such as "Client" or "Server" (other values are possible).  This can be used to
       distinguish consumer and enterprise versions of Windows that have the same version number
       (for example, Windows 7 and Windows 2008 Server are both version 6.1, but the former is
       "Client" and the latter is "Server").

       For enterprise Linux guests, in future we intend this to return the product variant such
       as "Desktop", "Server" and so on.  But this is not implemented at present.

       If the product variant could not be determined, then the string "unknown" is returned.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.  See also
       "guestfs_inspect_get_product_name", "guestfs_inspect_get_major_version".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.9.13)

   guestfs_inspect_get_roots
	char **
	guestfs_inspect_get_roots (guestfs_h *g);

       This function is a convenient way to get the list of root devices, as returned from a
       previous call to "guestfs_inspect_os", but without redoing the whole inspection process.

       This returns an empty list if either no root devices were found or the caller has not
       called "guestfs_inspect_os".

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.7.3)

   guestfs_inspect_get_type
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_type (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *root);

       This returns the type of the inspected operating system.  Currently defined types are:

       "linux"
	   Any Linux-based operating system.

       "windows"
	   Any Microsoft Windows operating system.

       "freebsd"
	   FreeBSD.

       "netbsd"
	   NetBSD.

       "openbsd"
	   OpenBSD.

       "hurd"
	   GNU/Hurd.

       "dos"
	   MS-DOS, FreeDOS and others.

       "unknown"
	   The operating system type could not be determined.

       Future versions of libguestfs may return other strings here.  The caller should be
       prepared to handle any string.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.5.3)

   guestfs_inspect_get_windows_current_control_set
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_windows_current_control_set (guestfs_h *g,
							 const char *root);

       This returns the Windows CurrentControlSet of the inspected guest.  The CurrentControlSet
       is a registry key name such as "ControlSet001".

       This call assumes that the guest is Windows and that the Registry could be examined by
       inspection.  If this is not the case then an error is returned.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.9.17)

   guestfs_inspect_get_windows_systemroot
	char *
	guestfs_inspect_get_windows_systemroot (guestfs_h *g,
						const char *root);

       This returns the Windows systemroot of the inspected guest.  The systemroot is a directory
       path such as "/WINDOWS".

       This call assumes that the guest is Windows and that the systemroot could be determined by
       inspection.  If this is not the case then an error is returned.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.5.25)

   guestfs_inspect_is_live
	int
	guestfs_inspect_is_live (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *root);

       If "guestfs_inspect_get_format" returns "installer" (this is an install disk), then this
       returns true if a live image was detected on the disk.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.9.4)

   guestfs_inspect_is_multipart
	int
	guestfs_inspect_is_multipart (guestfs_h *g,
				      const char *root);

       If "guestfs_inspect_get_format" returns "installer" (this is an install disk), then this
       returns true if the disk is part of a set.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.9.4)

   guestfs_inspect_is_netinst
	int
	guestfs_inspect_is_netinst (guestfs_h *g,
				    const char *root);

       If "guestfs_inspect_get_format" returns "installer" (this is an install disk), then this
       returns true if the disk is a network installer, ie. not a self-contained install CD but
       one which is likely to require network access to complete the install.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.9.4)

   guestfs_inspect_list_applications
	struct guestfs_application_list *
	guestfs_inspect_list_applications (guestfs_h *g,
					   const char *root);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_inspect_list_applications2"
       call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       Return the list of applications installed in the operating system.

       Note: This call works differently from other parts of the inspection API.  You have to
       call "guestfs_inspect_os", then "guestfs_inspect_get_mountpoints", then mount up the
       disks, before calling this.  Listing applications is a significantly more difficult
       operation which requires access to the full filesystem.	Also note that unlike the other
       "guestfs_inspect_get_*" calls which are just returning data cached in the libguestfs
       handle, this call actually reads parts of the mounted filesystems during the call.

       This returns an empty list if the inspection code was not able to determine the list of
       applications.

       The application structure contains the following fields:

       "app_name"
	   The name of the application.  For Red Hat-derived and Debian-derived Linux guests,
	   this is the package name.

       "app_display_name"
	   The display name of the application, sometimes localized to the install language of
	   the guest operating system.

	   If unavailable this is returned as an empty string "".  Callers needing to display
	   something can use "app_name" instead.

       "app_epoch"
	   For package managers which use epochs, this contains the epoch of the package (an
	   integer).  If unavailable, this is returned as 0.

       "app_version"
	   The version string of the application or package.  If unavailable this is returned as
	   an empty string "".

       "app_release"
	   The release string of the application or package, for package managers that use this.
	   If unavailable this is returned as an empty string "".

       "app_install_path"
	   The installation path of the application (on operating systems such as Windows which
	   use installation paths).  This path is in the format used by the guest operating
	   system, it is not a libguestfs path.

	   If unavailable this is returned as an empty string "".

       "app_trans_path"
	   The install path translated into a libguestfs path.	If unavailable this is returned
	   as an empty string "".

       "app_publisher"
	   The name of the publisher of the application, for package managers that use this.  If
	   unavailable this is returned as an empty string "".

       "app_url"
	   The URL (eg. upstream URL) of the application.  If unavailable this is returned as an
	   empty string "".

       "app_source_package"
	   For packaging systems which support this, the name of the source package.  If
	   unavailable this is returned as an empty string "".

       "app_summary"
	   A short (usually one line) description of the application or package.  If unavailable
	   this is returned as an empty string "".

       "app_description"
	   A longer description of the application or package.	If unavailable this is returned
	   as an empty string "".

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_application_list *", or NULL if there was an
       error.  The caller must call "guestfs_free_application_list" after use.

       (Added in 1.7.8)

   guestfs_inspect_list_applications2
	struct guestfs_application2_list *
	guestfs_inspect_list_applications2 (guestfs_h *g,
					    const char *root);

       Return the list of applications installed in the operating system.

       Note: This call works differently from other parts of the inspection API.  You have to
       call "guestfs_inspect_os", then "guestfs_inspect_get_mountpoints", then mount up the
       disks, before calling this.  Listing applications is a significantly more difficult
       operation which requires access to the full filesystem.	Also note that unlike the other
       "guestfs_inspect_get_*" calls which are just returning data cached in the libguestfs
       handle, this call actually reads parts of the mounted filesystems during the call.

       This returns an empty list if the inspection code was not able to determine the list of
       applications.

       The application structure contains the following fields:

       "app2_name"
	   The name of the application.  For Red Hat-derived and Debian-derived Linux guests,
	   this is the package name.

       "app2_display_name"
	   The display name of the application, sometimes localized to the install language of
	   the guest operating system.

	   If unavailable this is returned as an empty string "".  Callers needing to display
	   something can use "app2_name" instead.

       "app2_epoch"
	   For package managers which use epochs, this contains the epoch of the package (an
	   integer).  If unavailable, this is returned as 0.

       "app2_version"
	   The version string of the application or package.  If unavailable this is returned as
	   an empty string "".

       "app2_release"
	   The release string of the application or package, for package managers that use this.
	   If unavailable this is returned as an empty string "".

       "app2_arch"
	   The architecture string of the application or package, for package managers that use
	   this.  If unavailable this is returned as an empty string "".

       "app2_install_path"
	   The installation path of the application (on operating systems such as Windows which
	   use installation paths).  This path is in the format used by the guest operating
	   system, it is not a libguestfs path.

	   If unavailable this is returned as an empty string "".

       "app2_trans_path"
	   The install path translated into a libguestfs path.	If unavailable this is returned
	   as an empty string "".

       "app2_publisher"
	   The name of the publisher of the application, for package managers that use this.  If
	   unavailable this is returned as an empty string "".

       "app2_url"
	   The URL (eg. upstream URL) of the application.  If unavailable this is returned as an
	   empty string "".

       "app2_source_package"
	   For packaging systems which support this, the name of the source package.  If
	   unavailable this is returned as an empty string "".

       "app2_summary"
	   A short (usually one line) description of the application or package.  If unavailable
	   this is returned as an empty string "".

       "app2_description"
	   A longer description of the application or package.	If unavailable this is returned
	   as an empty string "".

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_application2_list *", or NULL if there was an
       error.  The caller must call "guestfs_free_application2_list" after use.

       (Added in 1.19.56)

   guestfs_inspect_os
	char **
	guestfs_inspect_os (guestfs_h *g);

       This function uses other libguestfs functions and certain heuristics to inspect the
       disk(s) (usually disks belonging to a virtual machine), looking for operating systems.

       The list returned is empty if no operating systems were found.

       If one operating system was found, then this returns a list with a single element, which
       is the name of the root filesystem of this operating system.  It is also possible for this
       function to return a list containing more than one element, indicating a dual-boot or
       multi-boot virtual machine, with each element being the root filesystem of one of the
       operating systems.

       You can pass the root string(s) returned to other "guestfs_inspect_get_*" functions in
       order to query further information about each operating system, such as the name and
       version.

       This function uses other libguestfs features such as "guestfs_mount_ro" and
       "guestfs_umount_all" in order to mount and unmount filesystems and look at the contents.
       This should be called with no disks currently mounted.  The function may also use Augeas,
       so any existing Augeas handle will be closed.

       This function cannot decrypt encrypted disks.  The caller must do that first (supplying
       the necessary keys) if the disk is encrypted.

       Please read "INSPECTION" in guestfs(3) for more details.

       See also "guestfs_list_filesystems".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.5.3)

   guestfs_is_blockdev
	int
	guestfs_is_blockdev (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *path);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_is_blockdev_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 1.5.10)

   guestfs_is_blockdev_opts
	int
	guestfs_is_blockdev_opts (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *path,
				  ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_IS_BLOCKDEV_OPTS_FOLLOWSYMLINKS, int followsymlinks,

       This returns "true" if and only if there is a block device with the given "path" name.

       If the optional flag "followsymlinks" is true, then a symlink (or chain of symlinks) that
       ends with a block device also causes the function to return true.

       See also "guestfs_stat".

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

   guestfs_is_blockdev_opts_va
	int
	guestfs_is_blockdev_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
				     const char *path,
				     va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_is_blockdev_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_is_blockdev_opts_argv
	int
	guestfs_is_blockdev_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				       const char *path,
				       const struct guestfs_is_blockdev_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_is_blockdev_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_is_busy
	int
	guestfs_is_busy (guestfs_h *g);

       This always returns false.  This function is deprecated with no replacement.  Do not use
       this function.

       For more information on states, see guestfs(3).

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.2)

   guestfs_is_chardev
	int
	guestfs_is_chardev (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *path);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_is_chardev_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 1.5.10)

   guestfs_is_chardev_opts
	int
	guestfs_is_chardev_opts (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *path,
				 ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_IS_CHARDEV_OPTS_FOLLOWSYMLINKS, int followsymlinks,

       This returns "true" if and only if there is a character device with the given "path" name.

       If the optional flag "followsymlinks" is true, then a symlink (or chain of symlinks) that
       ends with a chardev also causes the function to return true.

       See also "guestfs_stat".

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

   guestfs_is_chardev_opts_va
	int
	guestfs_is_chardev_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
				    const char *path,
				    va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_is_chardev_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_is_chardev_opts_argv
	int
	guestfs_is_chardev_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				      const char *path,
				      const struct guestfs_is_chardev_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_is_chardev_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_is_config
	int
	guestfs_is_config (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns true iff this handle is being configured (in the "CONFIG" state).

       For more information on states, see guestfs(3).

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.2)

   guestfs_is_dir
	int
	guestfs_is_dir (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *path);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_is_dir_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_is_dir_opts
	int
	guestfs_is_dir_opts (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *path,
			     ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_IS_DIR_OPTS_FOLLOWSYMLINKS, int followsymlinks,

       This returns "true" if and only if there is a directory with the given "path" name.  Note
       that it returns false for other objects like files.

       If the optional flag "followsymlinks" is true, then a symlink (or chain of symlinks) that
       ends with a directory also causes the function to return true.

       See also "guestfs_stat".

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

   guestfs_is_dir_opts_va
	int
	guestfs_is_dir_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *path,
				va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_is_dir_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_is_dir_opts_argv
	int
	guestfs_is_dir_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *path,
				  const struct guestfs_is_dir_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_is_dir_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_is_fifo
	int
	guestfs_is_fifo (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *path);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_is_fifo_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 1.5.10)

   guestfs_is_fifo_opts
	int
	guestfs_is_fifo_opts (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *path,
			      ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_IS_FIFO_OPTS_FOLLOWSYMLINKS, int followsymlinks,

       This returns "true" if and only if there is a FIFO (named pipe) with the given "path"
       name.

       If the optional flag "followsymlinks" is true, then a symlink (or chain of symlinks) that
       ends with a FIFO also causes the function to return true.

       See also "guestfs_stat".

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

   guestfs_is_fifo_opts_va
	int
	guestfs_is_fifo_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *path,
				 va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_is_fifo_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_is_fifo_opts_argv
	int
	guestfs_is_fifo_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *path,
				   const struct guestfs_is_fifo_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_is_fifo_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_is_file
	int
	guestfs_is_file (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *path);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_is_file_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_is_file_opts
	int
	guestfs_is_file_opts (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *path,
			      ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_IS_FILE_OPTS_FOLLOWSYMLINKS, int followsymlinks,

       This returns "true" if and only if there is a regular file with the given "path" name.
       Note that it returns false for other objects like directories.

       If the optional flag "followsymlinks" is true, then a symlink (or chain of symlinks) that
       ends with a file also causes the function to return true.

       See also "guestfs_stat".

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

   guestfs_is_file_opts_va
	int
	guestfs_is_file_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *path,
				 va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_is_file_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_is_file_opts_argv
	int
	guestfs_is_file_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *path,
				   const struct guestfs_is_file_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_is_file_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_is_launching
	int
	guestfs_is_launching (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns true iff this handle is launching the subprocess (in the "LAUNCHING" state).

       For more information on states, see guestfs(3).

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.2)

   guestfs_is_lv
	int
	guestfs_is_lv (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *device);

       This command tests whether "device" is a logical volume, and returns true iff this is the
       case.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.5.3)

   guestfs_is_ready
	int
	guestfs_is_ready (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns true iff this handle is ready to accept commands (in the "READY" state).

       For more information on states, see guestfs(3).

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.2)

   guestfs_is_socket
	int
	guestfs_is_socket (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *path);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_is_socket_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 1.5.10)

   guestfs_is_socket_opts
	int
	guestfs_is_socket_opts (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *path,
				...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_IS_SOCKET_OPTS_FOLLOWSYMLINKS, int followsymlinks,

       This returns "true" if and only if there is a Unix domain socket with the given "path"
       name.

       If the optional flag "followsymlinks" is true, then a symlink (or chain of symlinks) that
       ends with a socket also causes the function to return true.

       See also "guestfs_stat".

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

   guestfs_is_socket_opts_va
	int
	guestfs_is_socket_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *path,
				   va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_is_socket_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_is_socket_opts_argv
	int
	guestfs_is_socket_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				     const char *path,
				     const struct guestfs_is_socket_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_is_socket_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_is_symlink
	int
	guestfs_is_symlink (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *path);

       This returns "true" if and only if there is a symbolic link with the given "path" name.

       See also "guestfs_stat".

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.5.10)

   guestfs_is_whole_device
	int
	guestfs_is_whole_device (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *device);

       This returns "true" if and only if "device" refers to a whole block device. That is, not a
       partition or a logical device.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.21.9)

   guestfs_is_zero
	int
	guestfs_is_zero (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *path);

       This returns true iff the file exists and the file is empty or it contains all zero bytes.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.11.8)

   guestfs_is_zero_device
	int
	guestfs_is_zero_device (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *device);

       This returns true iff the device exists and contains all zero bytes.

       Note that for large devices this can take a long time to run.

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.11.8)

   guestfs_isoinfo
	struct guestfs_isoinfo *
	guestfs_isoinfo (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *isofile);

       This is the same as "guestfs_isoinfo_device" except that it works for an ISO file located
       inside some other mounted filesystem.  Note that in the common case where you have added
       an ISO file as a libguestfs device, you would not call this.  Instead you would call
       "guestfs_isoinfo_device".

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_isoinfo *", or NULL if there was an error.  The
       caller must call "guestfs_free_isoinfo" after use.

       (Added in 1.17.19)

   guestfs_isoinfo_device
	struct guestfs_isoinfo *
	guestfs_isoinfo_device (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *device);

       "device" is an ISO device.  This returns a struct of information read from the primary
       volume descriptor (the ISO equivalent of the superblock) of the device.

       Usually it is more efficient to use the isoinfo(1) command with the -d option on the host
       to analyze ISO files, instead of going through libguestfs.

       For information on the primary volume descriptor fields, see
       http://wiki.osdev.org/ISO_9660#The_Primary_Volume_Descriptor

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_isoinfo *", or NULL if there was an error.  The
       caller must call "guestfs_free_isoinfo" after use.

       (Added in 1.17.19)

   guestfs_kill_subprocess
	int
	guestfs_kill_subprocess (guestfs_h *g);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_shutdown" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This kills the qemu subprocess.

       Do not call this.  See: "guestfs_shutdown" instead.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_launch
	int
	guestfs_launch (guestfs_h *g);

       Internally libguestfs is implemented by running a virtual machine using qemu(1).

       You should call this after configuring the handle (eg. adding drives) but before
       performing any actions.

       Do not call "guestfs_launch" twice on the same handle.  Although it will not give an error
       (for historical reasons), the precise behaviour when you do this is not well defined.
       Handles are very cheap to create, so create a new one for each launch.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_lchown
	int
	guestfs_lchown (guestfs_h *g,
			int owner,
			int group,
			const char *path);

       Change the file owner to "owner" and group to "group".  This is like "guestfs_chown" but
       if "path" is a symlink then the link itself is changed, not the target.

       Only numeric uid and gid are supported.	If you want to use names, you will need to locate
       and parse the password file yourself (Augeas support makes this relatively easy).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.77)

   guestfs_ldmtool_create_all
	int
	guestfs_ldmtool_create_all (guestfs_h *g);

       This function scans all block devices looking for Windows dynamic disk volumes and
       partitions, and creates devices for any that were found.

       Call "guestfs_list_ldm_volumes" and "guestfs_list_ldm_partitions" to return all devices.

       Note that you don't normally need to call this explicitly, since it is done automatically
       at "guestfs_launch" time.  However you might want to call this function if you have
       hotplugged disks or have just created a Windows dynamic disk.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.20.0)

   guestfs_ldmtool_diskgroup_disks
	char **
	guestfs_ldmtool_diskgroup_disks (guestfs_h *g,
					 const char *diskgroup);

       Return the disks in a Windows dynamic disk group.  The "diskgroup" parameter should be the
       GUID of a disk group, one element from the list returned by "guestfs_ldmtool_scan".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.20.0)

   guestfs_ldmtool_diskgroup_name
	char *
	guestfs_ldmtool_diskgroup_name (guestfs_h *g,
					const char *diskgroup);

       Return the name of a Windows dynamic disk group.  The "diskgroup" parameter should be the
       GUID of a disk group, one element from the list returned by "guestfs_ldmtool_scan".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.20.0)

   guestfs_ldmtool_diskgroup_volumes
	char **
	guestfs_ldmtool_diskgroup_volumes (guestfs_h *g,
					   const char *diskgroup);

       Return the volumes in a Windows dynamic disk group.  The "diskgroup" parameter should be
       the GUID of a disk group, one element from the list returned by "guestfs_ldmtool_scan".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.20.0)

   guestfs_ldmtool_remove_all
	int
	guestfs_ldmtool_remove_all (guestfs_h *g);

       This is essentially the opposite of "guestfs_ldmtool_create_all".  It removes the device
       mapper mappings for all Windows dynamic disk volumes

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.20.0)

   guestfs_ldmtool_scan
	char **
	guestfs_ldmtool_scan (guestfs_h *g);

       This function scans for Windows dynamic disks.  It returns a list of identifiers (GUIDs)
       for all disk groups that were found.  These identifiers can be passed to other
       "guestfs_ldmtool_*" functions.

       This function scans all block devices.  To scan a subset of block devices, call
       "guestfs_ldmtool_scan_devices" instead.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.20.0)

   guestfs_ldmtool_scan_devices
	char **
	guestfs_ldmtool_scan_devices (guestfs_h *g,
				      char *const *devices);

       This function scans for Windows dynamic disks.  It returns a list of identifiers (GUIDs)
       for all disk groups that were found.  These identifiers can be passed to other
       "guestfs_ldmtool_*" functions.

       The parameter "devices" is a list of block devices which are scanned.  If this list is
       empty, all block devices are scanned.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.20.0)

   guestfs_ldmtool_volume_hint
	char *
	guestfs_ldmtool_volume_hint (guestfs_h *g,
				     const char *diskgroup,
				     const char *volume);

       Return the hint field of the volume named "volume" in the disk group with GUID
       "diskgroup".  This may not be defined, in which case the empty string is returned.  The
       hint field is often, though not always, the name of a Windows drive, eg. "E:".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.20.0)

   guestfs_ldmtool_volume_partitions
	char **
	guestfs_ldmtool_volume_partitions (guestfs_h *g,
					   const char *diskgroup,
					   const char *volume);

       Return the list of partitions in the volume named "volume" in the disk group with GUID
       "diskgroup".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.20.0)

   guestfs_ldmtool_volume_type
	char *
	guestfs_ldmtool_volume_type (guestfs_h *g,
				     const char *diskgroup,
				     const char *volume);

       Return the type of the volume named "volume" in the disk group with GUID "diskgroup".

       Possible volume types that can be returned here include: "simple", "spanned", "striped",
       "mirrored", "raid5".  Other types may also be returned.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.20.0)

   guestfs_lgetxattr
	char *
	guestfs_lgetxattr (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *path,
			   const char *name,
			   size_t *size_r);

       Get a single extended attribute from file "path" named "name".  If "path" is a symlink,
       then this call returns an extended attribute from the symlink.

       Normally it is better to get all extended attributes from a file in one go by calling
       "guestfs_getxattrs".  However some Linux filesystem implementations are buggy and do not
       provide a way to list out attributes.  For these filesystems (notably ntfs-3g) you have to
       know the names of the extended attributes you want in advance and call this function.

       Extended attribute values are blobs of binary data.  If there is no extended attribute
       named "name", this returns an error.

       See also: "guestfs_lgetxattrs", "guestfs_getxattr", attr(5).

       This function returns a buffer, or NULL on error.  The size of the returned buffer is
       written to *size_r.  The caller must free the returned buffer after use.

       (Added in 1.7.24)

   guestfs_lgetxattrs
	struct guestfs_xattr_list *
	guestfs_lgetxattrs (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *path);

       This is the same as "guestfs_getxattrs", but if "path" is a symbolic link, then it returns
       the extended attributes of the link itself.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_xattr_list *", or NULL if there was an error.  The
       caller must call "guestfs_free_xattr_list" after use.

       (Added in 1.0.59)

   guestfs_list_devices
	char **
	guestfs_list_devices (guestfs_h *g);

       List all the block devices.

       The full block device names are returned, eg. "/dev/sda".

       See also "guestfs_list_filesystems".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 0.4)

   guestfs_list_disk_labels
	char **
	guestfs_list_disk_labels (guestfs_h *g);

       If you add drives using the optional "label" parameter of "guestfs_add_drive_opts", you
       can use this call to map between disk labels, and raw block device and partition names
       (like "/dev/sda" and "/dev/sda1").

       This returns a hashtable, where keys are the disk labels (without the "/dev/disk/guestfs"
       prefix), and the values are the full raw block device and partition names (eg. "/dev/sda"
       and "/dev/sda1").

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings, or NULL if there was an error.
       The array of strings will always have length "2n+1", where "n" keys and values alternate,
       followed by the trailing NULL entry.  The caller must free the strings and the array after
       use.

       (Added in 1.19.49)

   guestfs_list_dm_devices
	char **
	guestfs_list_dm_devices (guestfs_h *g);

       List all device mapper devices.

       The returned list contains "/dev/mapper/*" devices, eg. ones created by a previous call to
       "guestfs_luks_open".

       Device mapper devices which correspond to logical volumes are not returned in this list.
       Call "guestfs_lvs" if you want to list logical volumes.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.11.15)

   guestfs_list_filesystems
	char **
	guestfs_list_filesystems (guestfs_h *g);

       This inspection command looks for filesystems on partitions, block devices and logical
       volumes, returning a list of "mountables" containing filesystems and their type.

       The return value is a hash, where the keys are the devices containing filesystems, and the
       values are the filesystem types.  For example:

	"/dev/sda1" => "ntfs"
	"/dev/sda2" => "ext2"
	"/dev/vg_guest/lv_root" => "ext4"
	"/dev/vg_guest/lv_swap" => "swap"

       The key is not necessarily a block device. It may also be an opaque 'mountable' string
       which can be passed to "guestfs_mount".

       The value can have the special value "unknown", meaning the content of the device is
       undetermined or empty.  "swap" means a Linux swap partition.

       This command runs other libguestfs commands, which might include "guestfs_mount" and
       "guestfs_umount", and therefore you should use this soon after launch and only when
       nothing is mounted.

       Not all of the filesystems returned will be mountable.  In particular, swap partitions are
       returned in the list.  Also this command does not check that each filesystem found is
       valid and mountable, and some filesystems might be mountable but require special options.
       Filesystems may not all belong to a single logical operating system (use
       "guestfs_inspect_os" to look for OSes).

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings, or NULL if there was an error.
       The array of strings will always have length "2n+1", where "n" keys and values alternate,
       followed by the trailing NULL entry.  The caller must free the strings and the array after
       use.

       (Added in 1.5.15)

   guestfs_list_ldm_partitions
	char **
	guestfs_list_ldm_partitions (guestfs_h *g);

       This function returns all Windows dynamic disk partitions that were found at launch time.
       It returns a list of device names.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.20.0)

   guestfs_list_ldm_volumes
	char **
	guestfs_list_ldm_volumes (guestfs_h *g);

       This function returns all Windows dynamic disk volumes that were found at launch time.  It
       returns a list of device names.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.20.0)

   guestfs_list_md_devices
	char **
	guestfs_list_md_devices (guestfs_h *g);

       List all Linux md devices.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.15.4)

   guestfs_list_partitions
	char **
	guestfs_list_partitions (guestfs_h *g);

       List all the partitions detected on all block devices.

       The full partition device names are returned, eg. "/dev/sda1"

       This does not return logical volumes.  For that you will need to call "guestfs_lvs".

       See also "guestfs_list_filesystems".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 0.4)

   guestfs_ll
	char *
	guestfs_ll (guestfs_h *g,
		    const char *directory);

       List the files in "directory" (relative to the root directory, there is no cwd) in the
       format of 'ls -la'.

       This command is mostly useful for interactive sessions.	It is not intended that you try
       to parse the output string.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 0.4)

   guestfs_llz
	char *
	guestfs_llz (guestfs_h *g,
		     const char *directory);

       List the files in "directory" in the format of 'ls -laZ'.

       This command is mostly useful for interactive sessions.	It is not intended that you try
       to parse the output string.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.17.6)

   guestfs_ln
	int
	guestfs_ln (guestfs_h *g,
		    const char *target,
		    const char *linkname);

       This command creates a hard link using the "ln" command.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_ln_f
	int
	guestfs_ln_f (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *target,
		      const char *linkname);

       This command creates a hard link using the "ln -f" command.  The -f option removes the
       link ("linkname") if it exists already.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_ln_s
	int
	guestfs_ln_s (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *target,
		      const char *linkname);

       This command creates a symbolic link using the "ln -s" command.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_ln_sf
	int
	guestfs_ln_sf (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *target,
		       const char *linkname);

       This command creates a symbolic link using the "ln -sf" command, The -f option removes the
       link ("linkname") if it exists already.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_lremovexattr
	int
	guestfs_lremovexattr (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *xattr,
			      const char *path);

       This is the same as "guestfs_removexattr", but if "path" is a symbolic link, then it
       removes an extended attribute of the link itself.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.59)

   guestfs_ls
	char **
	guestfs_ls (guestfs_h *g,
		    const char *directory);

       List the files in "directory" (relative to the root directory, there is no cwd).  The '.'
       and '..' entries are not returned, but hidden files are shown.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 0.4)

   guestfs_ls0
	int
	guestfs_ls0 (guestfs_h *g,
		     const char *dir,
		     const char *filenames);

       This specialized command is used to get a listing of the filenames in the directory "dir".
       The list of filenames is written to the local file "filenames" (on the host).

       In the output file, the filenames are separated by "\0" characters.

       "." and ".." are not returned.  The filenames are not sorted.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.32)

   guestfs_lsetxattr
	int
	guestfs_lsetxattr (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *xattr,
			   const char *val,
			   int vallen,
			   const char *path);

       This is the same as "guestfs_setxattr", but if "path" is a symbolic link, then it sets an
       extended attribute of the link itself.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.59)

   guestfs_lstat
	struct guestfs_stat *
	guestfs_lstat (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *path);

       Returns file information for the given "path".

       This is the same as "guestfs_stat" except that if "path" is a symbolic link, then the link
       is stat-ed, not the file it refers to.

       This is the same as the lstat(2) system call.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_stat *", or NULL if there was an error.	The
       caller must call "guestfs_free_stat" after use.

       (Added in 0.9.2)

   guestfs_lstatlist
	struct guestfs_stat_list *
	guestfs_lstatlist (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *path,
			   char *const *names);

       This call allows you to perform the "guestfs_lstat" operation on multiple files, where all
       files are in the directory "path".  "names" is the list of files from this directory.

       On return you get a list of stat structs, with a one-to-one correspondence to the "names"
       list.  If any name did not exist or could not be lstat'd, then the "ino" field of that
       structure is set to "-1".

       This call is intended for programs that want to efficiently list a directory contents
       without making many round-trips.  See also "guestfs_lxattrlist" for a similarly efficient
       call for getting extended attributes.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_stat_list *", or NULL if there was an error.  The
       caller must call "guestfs_free_stat_list" after use.

       (Added in 1.0.77)

   guestfs_luks_add_key
	int
	guestfs_luks_add_key (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *device,
			      const char *key,
			      const char *newkey,
			      int keyslot);

       This command adds a new key on LUKS device "device".  "key" is any existing key, and is
       used to access the device.  "newkey" is the new key to add.  "keyslot" is the key slot
       that will be replaced.

       Note that if "keyslot" already contains a key, then this command will fail.  You have to
       use "guestfs_luks_kill_slot" first to remove that key.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This function takes a key or passphrase parameter which could contain sensitive material.
       Read the section "KEYS AND PASSPHRASES" for more information.

       (Added in 1.5.2)

   guestfs_luks_close
	int
	guestfs_luks_close (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *device);

       This closes a LUKS device that was created earlier by "guestfs_luks_open" or
       "guestfs_luks_open_ro".	The "device" parameter must be the name of the LUKS mapping
       device (ie. "/dev/mapper/mapname") and not the name of the underlying block device.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.5.1)

   guestfs_luks_format
	int
	guestfs_luks_format (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *device,
			     const char *key,
			     int keyslot);

       This command erases existing data on "device" and formats the device as a LUKS encrypted
       device.	"key" is the initial key, which is added to key slot "slot".  (LUKS supports 8
       key slots, numbered 0-7).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This function takes a key or passphrase parameter which could contain sensitive material.
       Read the section "KEYS AND PASSPHRASES" for more information.

       (Added in 1.5.2)

   guestfs_luks_format_cipher
	int
	guestfs_luks_format_cipher (guestfs_h *g,
				    const char *device,
				    const char *key,
				    int keyslot,
				    const char *cipher);

       This command is the same as "guestfs_luks_format" but it also allows you to set the
       "cipher" used.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This function takes a key or passphrase parameter which could contain sensitive material.
       Read the section "KEYS AND PASSPHRASES" for more information.

       (Added in 1.5.2)

   guestfs_luks_kill_slot
	int
	guestfs_luks_kill_slot (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *device,
				const char *key,
				int keyslot);

       This command deletes the key in key slot "keyslot" from the encrypted LUKS device
       "device".  "key" must be one of the other keys.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This function takes a key or passphrase parameter which could contain sensitive material.
       Read the section "KEYS AND PASSPHRASES" for more information.

       (Added in 1.5.2)

   guestfs_luks_open
	int
	guestfs_luks_open (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *device,
			   const char *key,
			   const char *mapname);

       This command opens a block device which has been encrypted according to the Linux Unified
       Key Setup (LUKS) standard.

       "device" is the encrypted block device or partition.

       The caller must supply one of the keys associated with the LUKS block device, in the "key"
       parameter.

       This creates a new block device called "/dev/mapper/mapname".  Reads and writes to this
       block device are decrypted from and encrypted to the underlying "device" respectively.

       If this block device contains LVM volume groups, then calling "guestfs_vgscan" followed by
       "guestfs_vg_activate_all" will make them visible.

       Use "guestfs_list_dm_devices" to list all device mapper devices.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This function takes a key or passphrase parameter which could contain sensitive material.
       Read the section "KEYS AND PASSPHRASES" for more information.

       (Added in 1.5.1)

   guestfs_luks_open_ro
	int
	guestfs_luks_open_ro (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *device,
			      const char *key,
			      const char *mapname);

       This is the same as "guestfs_luks_open" except that a read-only mapping is created.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This function takes a key or passphrase parameter which could contain sensitive material.
       Read the section "KEYS AND PASSPHRASES" for more information.

       (Added in 1.5.1)

   guestfs_lvcreate
	int
	guestfs_lvcreate (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *logvol,
			  const char *volgroup,
			  int mbytes);

       This creates an LVM logical volume called "logvol" on the volume group "volgroup", with
       "size" megabytes.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_lvcreate_free
	int
	guestfs_lvcreate_free (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *logvol,
			       const char *volgroup,
			       int percent);

       Create an LVM logical volume called "/dev/volgroup/logvol", using approximately "percent"
       % of the free space remaining in the volume group.  Most usefully, when "percent" is 100
       this will create the largest possible LV.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.18)

   guestfs_lvm_canonical_lv_name
	char *
	guestfs_lvm_canonical_lv_name (guestfs_h *g,
				       const char *lvname);

       This converts alternative naming schemes for LVs that you might find to the canonical
       name.  For example, "/dev/mapper/VG-LV" is converted to "/dev/VG/LV".

       This command returns an error if the "lvname" parameter does not refer to a logical
       volume.

       See also "guestfs_is_lv", "guestfs_canonical_device_name".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.5.24)

   guestfs_lvm_clear_filter
	int
	guestfs_lvm_clear_filter (guestfs_h *g);

       This undoes the effect of "guestfs_lvm_set_filter".  LVM will be able to see every block
       device.

       This command also clears the LVM cache and performs a volume group scan.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.5.1)

   guestfs_lvm_remove_all
	int
	guestfs_lvm_remove_all (guestfs_h *g);

       This command removes all LVM logical volumes, volume groups and physical volumes.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_lvm_set_filter
	int
	guestfs_lvm_set_filter (guestfs_h *g,
				char *const *devices);

       This sets the LVM device filter so that LVM will only be able to "see" the block devices
       in the list "devices", and will ignore all other attached block devices.

       Where disk image(s) contain duplicate PVs or VGs, this command is useful to get LVM to
       ignore the duplicates, otherwise LVM can get confused.  Note also there are two types of
       duplication possible: either cloned PVs/VGs which have identical UUIDs; or VGs that are
       not cloned but just happen to have the same name.  In normal operation you cannot create
       this situation, but you can do it outside LVM, eg.  by cloning disk images or by bit
       twiddling inside the LVM metadata.

       This command also clears the LVM cache and performs a volume group scan.

       You can filter whole block devices or individual partitions.

       You cannot use this if any VG is currently in use (eg.  contains a mounted filesystem),
       even if you are not filtering out that VG.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.5.1)

   guestfs_lvremove
	int
	guestfs_lvremove (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *device);

       Remove an LVM logical volume "device", where "device" is the path to the LV, such as
       "/dev/VG/LV".

       You can also remove all LVs in a volume group by specifying the VG name, "/dev/VG".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.13)

   guestfs_lvrename
	int
	guestfs_lvrename (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *logvol,
			  const char *newlogvol);

       Rename a logical volume "logvol" with the new name "newlogvol".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.83)

   guestfs_lvresize
	int
	guestfs_lvresize (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *device,
			  int mbytes);

       This resizes (expands or shrinks) an existing LVM logical volume to "mbytes".  When
       reducing, data in the reduced part is lost.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.27)

   guestfs_lvresize_free
	int
	guestfs_lvresize_free (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *lv,
			       int percent);

       This expands an existing logical volume "lv" so that it fills "pc"% of the remaining free
       space in the volume group.  Commonly you would call this with pc = 100 which expands the
       logical volume as much as possible, using all remaining free space in the volume group.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.3)

   guestfs_lvs
	char **
	guestfs_lvs (guestfs_h *g);

       List all the logical volumes detected.  This is the equivalent of the lvs(8) command.

       This returns a list of the logical volume device names (eg. "/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00").

       See also "guestfs_lvs_full", "guestfs_list_filesystems".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 0.4)

   guestfs_lvs_full
	struct guestfs_lvm_lv_list *
	guestfs_lvs_full (guestfs_h *g);

       List all the logical volumes detected.  This is the equivalent of the lvs(8) command.  The
       "full" version includes all fields.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_lvm_lv_list *", or NULL if there was an error.
       The caller must call "guestfs_free_lvm_lv_list" after use.

       (Added in 0.4)

   guestfs_lvuuid
	char *
	guestfs_lvuuid (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *device);

       This command returns the UUID of the LVM LV "device".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.87)

   guestfs_lxattrlist
	struct guestfs_xattr_list *
	guestfs_lxattrlist (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *path,
			    char *const *names);

       This call allows you to get the extended attributes of multiple files, where all files are
       in the directory "path".  "names" is the list of files from this directory.

       On return you get a flat list of xattr structs which must be interpreted sequentially.
       The first xattr struct always has a zero-length "attrname".  "attrval" in this struct is
       zero-length to indicate there was an error doing "lgetxattr" for this file, or is a C
       string which is a decimal number (the number of following attributes for this file, which
       could be "0").  Then after the first xattr struct are the zero or more attributes for the
       first named file.  This repeats for the second and subsequent files.

       This call is intended for programs that want to efficiently list a directory contents
       without making many round-trips.  See also "guestfs_lstatlist" for a similarly efficient
       call for getting standard stats.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_xattr_list *", or NULL if there was an error.  The
       caller must call "guestfs_free_xattr_list" after use.

       (Added in 1.0.77)

   guestfs_max_disks
	int
	guestfs_max_disks (guestfs_h *g);

       Return the maximum number of disks that may be added to a handle (eg. by
       "guestfs_add_drive_opts" and similar calls).

       This function was added in libguestfs 1.19.7.  In previous versions of libguestfs the
       limit was 25.

       See "MAXIMUM NUMBER OF DISKS" in guestfs(3) for additional information on this topic.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.19.7)

   guestfs_md_create
	int
	guestfs_md_create (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *name,
			   char *const *devices,
			   ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_MD_CREATE_MISSINGBITMAP, int64_t missingbitmap,
	GUESTFS_MD_CREATE_NRDEVICES, int nrdevices,
	GUESTFS_MD_CREATE_SPARE, int spare,
	GUESTFS_MD_CREATE_CHUNK, int64_t chunk,
	GUESTFS_MD_CREATE_LEVEL, const char *level,

       Create a Linux md (RAID) device named "name" on the devices in the list "devices".

       The optional parameters are:

       "missingbitmap"
	   A bitmap of missing devices.  If a bit is set it means that a missing device is added
	   to the array.  The least significant bit corresponds to the first device in the array.

	   As examples:

	   If "devices = ["/dev/sda"]" and "missingbitmap = 0x1" then the resulting array would
	   be "[<missing>, "/dev/sda"]".

	   If "devices = ["/dev/sda"]" and "missingbitmap = 0x2" then the resulting array would
	   be "["/dev/sda", <missing>]".

	   This defaults to 0 (no missing devices).

	   The length of "devices" + the number of bits set in "missingbitmap" must equal
	   "nrdevices" + "spare".

       "nrdevices"
	   The number of active RAID devices.

	   If not set, this defaults to the length of "devices" plus the number of bits set in
	   "missingbitmap".

       "spare"
	   The number of spare devices.

	   If not set, this defaults to 0.

       "chunk"
	   The chunk size in bytes.

       "level"
	   The RAID level, which can be one of: linear, raid0, 0, stripe, raid1, 1, mirror,
	   raid4, 4, raid5, 5, raid6, 6, raid10, 10.  Some of these are synonymous, and more
	   levels may be added in future.

	   If not set, this defaults to "raid1".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.15.6)

   guestfs_md_create_va
	int
	guestfs_md_create_va (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *name,
			      char *const *devices,
			      va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_md_create".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_md_create_argv
	int
	guestfs_md_create_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *name,
				char *const *devices,
				const struct guestfs_md_create_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_md_create".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_md_detail
	char **
	guestfs_md_detail (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *md);

       This command exposes the output of 'mdadm -DY <md>'.  The following fields are usually
       present in the returned hash.  Other fields may also be present.

       "level"
	   The raid level of the MD device.

       "devices"
	   The number of underlying devices in the MD device.

       "metadata"
	   The metadata version used.

       "uuid"
	   The UUID of the MD device.

       "name"
	   The name of the MD device.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings, or NULL if there was an error.
       The array of strings will always have length "2n+1", where "n" keys and values alternate,
       followed by the trailing NULL entry.  The caller must free the strings and the array after
       use.

       (Added in 1.15.6)

   guestfs_md_stat
	struct guestfs_mdstat_list *
	guestfs_md_stat (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *md);

       This call returns a list of the underlying devices which make up the single software RAID
       array device "md".

       To get a list of software RAID devices, call "guestfs_list_md_devices".

       Each structure returned corresponds to one device along with additional status
       information:

       "mdstat_device"
	   The name of the underlying device.

       "mdstat_index"
	   The index of this device within the array.

       "mdstat_flags"
	   Flags associated with this device.  This is a string containing (in no specific order)
	   zero or more of the following flags:

	   "W" write-mostly

	   "F" device is faulty

	   "S" device is a RAID spare

	   "R" replacement

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_mdstat_list *", or NULL if there was an error.
       The caller must call "guestfs_free_mdstat_list" after use.

       (Added in 1.17.21)

   guestfs_md_stop
	int
	guestfs_md_stop (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *md);

       This command deactivates the MD array named "md".  The device is stopped, but it is not
       destroyed or zeroed.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.15.6)

   guestfs_mkdir
	int
	guestfs_mkdir (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *path);

       Create a directory named "path".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_mkdir_mode
	int
	guestfs_mkdir_mode (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *path,
			    int mode);

       This command creates a directory, setting the initial permissions of the directory to
       "mode".

       For common Linux filesystems, the actual mode which is set will be "mode & ~umask &
       01777".	Non-native-Linux filesystems may interpret the mode in other ways.

       See also "guestfs_mkdir", "guestfs_umask"

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.77)

   guestfs_mkdir_p
	int
	guestfs_mkdir_p (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *path);

       Create a directory named "path", creating any parent directories as necessary.  This is
       like the "mkdir -p" shell command.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_mkdtemp
	char *
	guestfs_mkdtemp (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *tmpl);

       This command creates a temporary directory.  The "tmpl" parameter should be a full
       pathname for the temporary directory name with the final six characters being "XXXXXX".

       For example: "/tmp/myprogXXXXXX" or "/Temp/myprogXXXXXX", the second one being suitable
       for Windows filesystems.

       The name of the temporary directory that was created is returned.

       The temporary directory is created with mode 0700 and is owned by root.

       The caller is responsible for deleting the temporary directory and its contents after use.

       See also: mkdtemp(3)

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.54)

   guestfs_mke2fs
	int
	guestfs_mke2fs (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *device,
			...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_BLOCKSCOUNT, int64_t blockscount,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_BLOCKSIZE, int64_t blocksize,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_FRAGSIZE, int64_t fragsize,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_BLOCKSPERGROUP, int64_t blockspergroup,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_NUMBEROFGROUPS, int64_t numberofgroups,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_BYTESPERINODE, int64_t bytesperinode,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_INODESIZE, int64_t inodesize,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_JOURNALSIZE, int64_t journalsize,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_NUMBEROFINODES, int64_t numberofinodes,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_STRIDESIZE, int64_t stridesize,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_STRIPEWIDTH, int64_t stripewidth,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_MAXONLINERESIZE, int64_t maxonlineresize,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_RESERVEDBLOCKSPERCENTAGE, int reservedblockspercentage,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_MMPUPDATEINTERVAL, int mmpupdateinterval,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_JOURNALDEVICE, const char *journaldevice,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_LABEL, const char *label,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_LASTMOUNTEDDIR, const char *lastmounteddir,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_CREATOROS, const char *creatoros,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_FSTYPE, const char *fstype,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_USAGETYPE, const char *usagetype,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_UUID, const char *uuid,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_FORCECREATE, int forcecreate,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_WRITESBANDGROUPONLY, int writesbandgrouponly,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_LAZYITABLEINIT, int lazyitableinit,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_LAZYJOURNALINIT, int lazyjournalinit,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_TESTFS, int testfs,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_DISCARD, int discard,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_QUOTATYPE, int quotatype,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_EXTENT, int extent,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_FILETYPE, int filetype,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_FLEXBG, int flexbg,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_HASJOURNAL, int hasjournal,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_JOURNALDEV, int journaldev,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_LARGEFILE, int largefile,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_QUOTA, int quota,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_RESIZEINODE, int resizeinode,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_SPARSESUPER, int sparsesuper,
	GUESTFS_MKE2FS_UNINITBG, int uninitbg,

       "mke2fs" is used to create an ext2, ext3, or ext4 filesystem on "device".

       The optional "blockscount" is the size of the filesystem in blocks.  If omitted it
       defaults to the size of "device".  Note if the filesystem is too small to contain a
       journal, "mke2fs" will silently create an ext2 filesystem instead.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.44)

   guestfs_mke2fs_va
	int
	guestfs_mke2fs_va (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *device,
			   va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_mke2fs".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_mke2fs_argv
	int
	guestfs_mke2fs_argv (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *device,
			     const struct guestfs_mke2fs_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_mke2fs".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_mke2fs_J
	int
	guestfs_mke2fs_J (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *fstype,
			  int blocksize,
			  const char *device,
			  const char *journal);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_mke2fs" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This creates an ext2/3/4 filesystem on "device" with an external journal on "journal".  It
       is equivalent to the command:

	mke2fs -t fstype -b blocksize -J device=<journal> <device>

       See also "guestfs_mke2journal".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.68)

   guestfs_mke2fs_JL
	int
	guestfs_mke2fs_JL (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *fstype,
			   int blocksize,
			   const char *device,
			   const char *label);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_mke2fs" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This creates an ext2/3/4 filesystem on "device" with an external journal on the journal
       labeled "label".

       See also "guestfs_mke2journal_L".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.68)

   guestfs_mke2fs_JU
	int
	guestfs_mke2fs_JU (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *fstype,
			   int blocksize,
			   const char *device,
			   const char *uuid);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_mke2fs" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This creates an ext2/3/4 filesystem on "device" with an external journal on the journal
       with UUID "uuid".

       See also "guestfs_mke2journal_U".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.68)

   guestfs_mke2journal
	int
	guestfs_mke2journal (guestfs_h *g,
			     int blocksize,
			     const char *device);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_mke2fs" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This creates an ext2 external journal on "device".  It is equivalent to the command:

	mke2fs -O journal_dev -b blocksize device

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.68)

   guestfs_mke2journal_L
	int
	guestfs_mke2journal_L (guestfs_h *g,
			       int blocksize,
			       const char *label,
			       const char *device);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_mke2fs" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This creates an ext2 external journal on "device" with label "label".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.68)

   guestfs_mke2journal_U
	int
	guestfs_mke2journal_U (guestfs_h *g,
			       int blocksize,
			       const char *uuid,
			       const char *device);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_mke2fs" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This creates an ext2 external journal on "device" with UUID "uuid".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.68)

   guestfs_mkfifo
	int
	guestfs_mkfifo (guestfs_h *g,
			int mode,
			const char *path);

       This call creates a FIFO (named pipe) called "path" with mode "mode".  It is just a
       convenient wrapper around "guestfs_mknod".

       The mode actually set is affected by the umask.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.55)

   guestfs_mkfs
	int
	guestfs_mkfs (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *fstype,
		      const char *device);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_mkfs_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_mkfs_opts
	int
	guestfs_mkfs_opts (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *fstype,
			   const char *device,
			   ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_MKFS_OPTS_BLOCKSIZE, int blocksize,
	GUESTFS_MKFS_OPTS_FEATURES, const char *features,
	GUESTFS_MKFS_OPTS_INODE, int inode,
	GUESTFS_MKFS_OPTS_SECTORSIZE, int sectorsize,

       This function creates a filesystem on "device".	The filesystem type is "fstype", for
       example "ext3".

       The optional arguments are:

       "blocksize"
	   The filesystem block size.  Supported block sizes depend on the filesystem type, but
	   typically they are 1024, 2048 or 4096 for Linux ext2/3 filesystems.

	   For VFAT and NTFS the "blocksize" parameter is treated as the requested cluster size.

	   For UFS block sizes, please see mkfs.ufs(8).

       "features"
	   This passes the -O parameter to the external mkfs program.

	   For certain filesystem types, this allows extra filesystem features to be selected.
	   See mke2fs(8) and mkfs.ufs(8) for more details.

	   You cannot use this optional parameter with the "gfs" or "gfs2" filesystem type.

       "inode"
	   This passes the -I parameter to the external mke2fs(8) program which sets the inode
	   size (only for ext2/3/4 filesystems at present).

       "sectorsize"
	   This passes the -S parameter to external mkfs.ufs(8) program, which sets sector size
	   for ufs filesystem.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.7.19)

   guestfs_mkfs_opts_va
	int
	guestfs_mkfs_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *fstype,
			      const char *device,
			      va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_mkfs_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_mkfs_opts_argv
	int
	guestfs_mkfs_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *fstype,
				const char *device,
				const struct guestfs_mkfs_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_mkfs_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_mkfs_b
	int
	guestfs_mkfs_b (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *fstype,
			int blocksize,
			const char *device);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_mkfs" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This call is similar to "guestfs_mkfs", but it allows you to control the block size of the
       resulting filesystem.  Supported block sizes depend on the filesystem type, but typically
       they are 1024, 2048 or 4096 only.

       For VFAT and NTFS the "blocksize" parameter is treated as the requested cluster size.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.68)

   guestfs_mkfs_btrfs
	int
	guestfs_mkfs_btrfs (guestfs_h *g,
			    char *const *devices,
			    ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_MKFS_BTRFS_ALLOCSTART, int64_t allocstart,
	GUESTFS_MKFS_BTRFS_BYTECOUNT, int64_t bytecount,
	GUESTFS_MKFS_BTRFS_DATATYPE, const char *datatype,
	GUESTFS_MKFS_BTRFS_LEAFSIZE, int leafsize,
	GUESTFS_MKFS_BTRFS_LABEL, const char *label,
	GUESTFS_MKFS_BTRFS_METADATA, const char *metadata,
	GUESTFS_MKFS_BTRFS_NODESIZE, int nodesize,
	GUESTFS_MKFS_BTRFS_SECTORSIZE, int sectorsize,

       Create a btrfs filesystem, allowing all configurables to be set.  For more information on
       the optional arguments, see mkfs.btrfs(8).

       Since btrfs filesystems can span multiple devices, this takes a non-empty list of devices.

       To create general filesystems, use "guestfs_mkfs".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.25)

   guestfs_mkfs_btrfs_va
	int
	guestfs_mkfs_btrfs_va (guestfs_h *g,
			       char *const *devices,
			       va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_mkfs_btrfs".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_mkfs_btrfs_argv
	int
	guestfs_mkfs_btrfs_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				 char *const *devices,
				 const struct guestfs_mkfs_btrfs_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_mkfs_btrfs".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_mklost_and_found
	int
	guestfs_mklost_and_found (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *mountpoint);

       Make the "lost+found" directory, normally in the root directory of an ext2/3/4 filesystem.
       "mountpoint" is the directory under which we try to create the "lost+found" directory.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.56)

   guestfs_mkmountpoint
	int
	guestfs_mkmountpoint (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *exemptpath);

       "guestfs_mkmountpoint" and "guestfs_rmmountpoint" are specialized calls that can be used
       to create extra mountpoints before mounting the first filesystem.

       These calls are only necessary in some very limited circumstances, mainly the case where
       you want to mount a mix of unrelated and/or read-only filesystems together.

       For example, live CDs often contain a "Russian doll" nest of filesystems, an ISO outer
       layer, with a squashfs image inside, with an ext2/3 image inside that.  You can unpack
       this as follows in guestfish:

	add-ro Fedora-11-i686-Live.iso
	run
	mkmountpoint /cd
	mkmountpoint /sqsh
	mkmountpoint /ext3fs
	mount /dev/sda /cd
	mount-loop /cd/LiveOS/squashfs.img /sqsh
	mount-loop /sqsh/LiveOS/ext3fs.img /ext3fs

       The inner filesystem is now unpacked under the /ext3fs mountpoint.

       "guestfs_mkmountpoint" is not compatible with "guestfs_umount_all".  You may get
       unexpected errors if you try to mix these calls.  It is safest to manually unmount
       filesystems and remove mountpoints after use.

       "guestfs_umount_all" unmounts filesystems by sorting the paths longest first, so for this
       to work for manual mountpoints, you must ensure that the innermost mountpoints have the
       longest pathnames, as in the example code above.

       For more details see https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=599503

       Autosync [see "guestfs_set_autosync", this is set by default on handles] can cause
       "guestfs_umount_all" to be called when the handle is closed which can also trigger these
       issues.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.62)

   guestfs_mknod
	int
	guestfs_mknod (guestfs_h *g,
		       int mode,
		       int devmajor,
		       int devminor,
		       const char *path);

       This call creates block or character special devices, or named pipes (FIFOs).

       The "mode" parameter should be the mode, using the standard constants.  "devmajor" and
       "devminor" are the device major and minor numbers, only used when creating block and
       character special devices.

       Note that, just like mknod(2), the mode must be bitwise OR'd with S_IFBLK, S_IFCHR,
       S_IFIFO or S_IFSOCK (otherwise this call just creates a regular file).  These constants
       are available in the standard Linux header files, or you can use "guestfs_mknod_b",
       "guestfs_mknod_c" or "guestfs_mkfifo" which are wrappers around this command which bitwise
       OR in the appropriate constant for you.

       The mode actually set is affected by the umask.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.55)

   guestfs_mknod_b
	int
	guestfs_mknod_b (guestfs_h *g,
			 int mode,
			 int devmajor,
			 int devminor,
			 const char *path);

       This call creates a block device node called "path" with mode "mode" and device
       major/minor "devmajor" and "devminor".  It is just a convenient wrapper around
       "guestfs_mknod".

       The mode actually set is affected by the umask.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.55)

   guestfs_mknod_c
	int
	guestfs_mknod_c (guestfs_h *g,
			 int mode,
			 int devmajor,
			 int devminor,
			 const char *path);

       This call creates a char device node called "path" with mode "mode" and device major/minor
       "devmajor" and "devminor".  It is just a convenient wrapper around "guestfs_mknod".

       The mode actually set is affected by the umask.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.55)

   guestfs_mkswap
	int
	guestfs_mkswap (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *device);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_mkswap_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 1.0.55)

   guestfs_mkswap_opts
	int
	guestfs_mkswap_opts (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *device,
			     ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_MKSWAP_OPTS_LABEL, const char *label,
	GUESTFS_MKSWAP_OPTS_UUID, const char *uuid,

       Create a Linux swap partition on "device".

       The option arguments "label" and "uuid" allow you to set the label and/or UUID of the new
       swap partition.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.34)

   guestfs_mkswap_opts_va
	int
	guestfs_mkswap_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *device,
				va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_mkswap_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_mkswap_opts_argv
	int
	guestfs_mkswap_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *device,
				  const struct guestfs_mkswap_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_mkswap_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_mkswap_L
	int
	guestfs_mkswap_L (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *label,
			  const char *device);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_mkswap" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       Create a swap partition on "device" with label "label".

       Note that you cannot attach a swap label to a block device (eg. "/dev/sda"), just to a
       partition.  This appears to be a limitation of the kernel or swap tools.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.55)

   guestfs_mkswap_U
	int
	guestfs_mkswap_U (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *uuid,
			  const char *device);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_mkswap" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       Create a swap partition on "device" with UUID "uuid".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.55)

   guestfs_mkswap_file
	int
	guestfs_mkswap_file (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *path);

       Create a swap file.

       This command just writes a swap file signature to an existing file.  To create the file
       itself, use something like "guestfs_fallocate".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_mktemp
	char *
	guestfs_mktemp (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *tmpl,
			...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_MKTEMP_SUFFIX, const char *suffix,

       This command creates a temporary file.  The "tmpl" parameter should be a full pathname for
       the temporary directory name with the final six characters being "XXXXXX".

       For example: "/tmp/myprogXXXXXX" or "/Temp/myprogXXXXXX", the second one being suitable
       for Windows filesystems.

       The name of the temporary file that was created is returned.

       The temporary file is created with mode 0600 and is owned by root.

       The caller is responsible for deleting the temporary file after use.

       If the optional "suffix" parameter is given, then the suffix (eg. ".txt") is appended to
       the temporary name.

       See also: "guestfs_mkdtemp".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.19.53)

   guestfs_mktemp_va
	char *
	guestfs_mktemp_va (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *tmpl,
			   va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_mktemp".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_mktemp_argv
	char *
	guestfs_mktemp_argv (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *tmpl,
			     const struct guestfs_mktemp_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_mktemp".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_modprobe
	int
	guestfs_modprobe (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *modulename);

       This loads a kernel module in the appliance.

       The kernel module must have been whitelisted when libguestfs was built (see
       "appliance/kmod.whitelist.in" in the source).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.68)

   guestfs_mount
	int
	guestfs_mount (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *mountable,
		       const char *mountpoint);

       Mount a guest disk at a position in the filesystem.  Block devices are named "/dev/sda",
       "/dev/sdb" and so on, as they were added to the guest.  If those block devices contain
       partitions, they will have the usual names (eg. "/dev/sda1").  Also LVM "/dev/VG/LV"-style
       names can be used, or 'mountable' strings returned by "guestfs_list_filesystems" or
       "guestfs_inspect_get_mountpoints".

       The rules are the same as for mount(2):	A filesystem must first be mounted on "/" before
       others can be mounted.  Other filesystems can only be mounted on directories which already
       exist.

       The mounted filesystem is writable, if we have sufficient permissions on the underlying
       device.

       Before libguestfs 1.13.16, this call implicitly added the options "sync" and "noatime".
       The "sync" option greatly slowed writes and caused many problems for users.  If your
       program might need to work with older versions of libguestfs, use "guestfs_mount_options"
       instead (using an empty string for the first parameter if you don't want any options).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_mount_local
	int
	guestfs_mount_local (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *localmountpoint,
			     ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_MOUNT_LOCAL_READONLY, int readonly,
	GUESTFS_MOUNT_LOCAL_OPTIONS, const char *options,
	GUESTFS_MOUNT_LOCAL_CACHETIMEOUT, int cachetimeout,
	GUESTFS_MOUNT_LOCAL_DEBUGCALLS, int debugcalls,

       This call exports the libguestfs-accessible filesystem to a local mountpoint (directory)
       called "localmountpoint".  Ordinary reads and writes to files and directories under
       "localmountpoint" are redirected through libguestfs.

       If the optional "readonly" flag is set to true, then writes to the filesystem return error
       "EROFS".

       "options" is a comma-separated list of mount options.  See guestmount(1) for some useful
       options.

       "cachetimeout" sets the timeout (in seconds) for cached directory entries.  The default is
       60 seconds.  See guestmount(1) for further information.

       If "debugcalls" is set to true, then additional debugging information is generated for
       every FUSE call.

       When "guestfs_mount_local" returns, the filesystem is ready, but is not processing
       requests (access to it will block).  You have to call "guestfs_mount_local_run" to run the
       main loop.

       See "MOUNT LOCAL" in guestfs(3) for full documentation.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.22)

   guestfs_mount_local_va
	int
	guestfs_mount_local_va (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *localmountpoint,
				va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_mount_local".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_mount_local_argv
	int
	guestfs_mount_local_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *localmountpoint,
				  const struct guestfs_mount_local_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_mount_local".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_mount_local_run
	int
	guestfs_mount_local_run (guestfs_h *g);

       Run the main loop which translates kernel calls to libguestfs calls.

       This should only be called after "guestfs_mount_local" returns successfully.  The call
       will not return until the filesystem is unmounted.

       Note you must not make concurrent libguestfs calls on the same handle from another thread.

       You may call this from a different thread than the one which called "guestfs_mount_local",
       subject to the usual rules for threads and libguestfs (see "MULTIPLE HANDLES AND MULTIPLE
       THREADS" in guestfs(3)).

       See "MOUNT LOCAL" in guestfs(3) for full documentation.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.22)

   guestfs_mount_loop
	int
	guestfs_mount_loop (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *file,
			    const char *mountpoint);

       This command lets you mount "file" (a filesystem image in a file) on a mount point.  It is
       entirely equivalent to the command "mount -o loop file mountpoint".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.54)

   guestfs_mount_options
	int
	guestfs_mount_options (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *options,
			       const char *mountable,
			       const char *mountpoint);

       This is the same as the "guestfs_mount" command, but it allows you to set the mount
       options as for the mount(8) -o flag.

       If the "options" parameter is an empty string, then no options are passed (all options
       default to whatever the filesystem uses).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.10)

   guestfs_mount_ro
	int
	guestfs_mount_ro (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *mountable,
			  const char *mountpoint);

       This is the same as the "guestfs_mount" command, but it mounts the filesystem with the
       read-only (-o ro) flag.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.10)

   guestfs_mount_vfs
	int
	guestfs_mount_vfs (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *options,
			   const char *vfstype,
			   const char *mountable,
			   const char *mountpoint);

       This is the same as the "guestfs_mount" command, but it allows you to set both the mount
       options and the vfstype as for the mount(8) -o and -t flags.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.10)

   guestfs_mountpoints
	char **
	guestfs_mountpoints (guestfs_h *g);

       This call is similar to "guestfs_mounts".  That call returns a list of devices.	This one
       returns a hash table (map) of device name to directory where the device is mounted.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings, or NULL if there was an error.
       The array of strings will always have length "2n+1", where "n" keys and values alternate,
       followed by the trailing NULL entry.  The caller must free the strings and the array after
       use.

       (Added in 1.0.62)

   guestfs_mounts
	char **
	guestfs_mounts (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns the list of currently mounted filesystems.	It returns the list of devices
       (eg. "/dev/sda1", "/dev/VG/LV").

       Some internal mounts are not shown.

       See also: "guestfs_mountpoints"

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_mv
	int
	guestfs_mv (guestfs_h *g,
		    const char *src,
		    const char *dest);

       This moves a file from "src" to "dest" where "dest" is either a destination filename or
       destination directory.

       See also: "guestfs_rename".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.18)

   guestfs_nr_devices
	int
	guestfs_nr_devices (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns the number of whole block devices that were added.	This is the same as the
       number of devices that would be returned if you called "guestfs_list_devices".

       To find out the maximum number of devices that could be added, call "guestfs_max_disks".

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.19.15)

   guestfs_ntfs_3g_probe
	int
	guestfs_ntfs_3g_probe (guestfs_h *g,
			       int rw,
			       const char *device);

       This command runs the ntfs-3g.probe(8) command which probes an NTFS "device" for
       mountability.  (Not all NTFS volumes can be mounted read-write, and some cannot be mounted
       at all).

       "rw" is a boolean flag.	Set it to true if you want to test if the volume can be mounted
       read-write.  Set it to false if you want to test if the volume can be mounted read-only.

       The return value is an integer which 0 if the operation would succeed, or some non-zero
       value documented in the ntfs-3g.probe(8) manual page.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.0.43)

   guestfs_ntfsclone_in
	int
	guestfs_ntfsclone_in (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *backupfile,
			      const char *device);

       Restore the "backupfile" (from a previous call to "guestfs_ntfsclone_out") to "device",
       overwriting any existing contents of this device.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.9)

   guestfs_ntfsclone_out
	int
	guestfs_ntfsclone_out (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *device,
			       const char *backupfile,
			       ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_NTFSCLONE_OUT_METADATAONLY, int metadataonly,
	GUESTFS_NTFSCLONE_OUT_RESCUE, int rescue,
	GUESTFS_NTFSCLONE_OUT_IGNOREFSCHECK, int ignorefscheck,
	GUESTFS_NTFSCLONE_OUT_PRESERVETIMESTAMPS, int preservetimestamps,
	GUESTFS_NTFSCLONE_OUT_FORCE, int force,

       Stream the NTFS filesystem "device" to the local file "backupfile".  The format used for
       the backup file is a special format used by the ntfsclone(8) tool.

       If the optional "metadataonly" flag is true, then only the metadata is saved, losing all
       the user data (this is useful for diagnosing some filesystem problems).

       The optional "rescue", "ignorefscheck", "preservetimestamps" and "force" flags have
       precise meanings detailed in the ntfsclone(8) man page.

       Use "guestfs_ntfsclone_in" to restore the file back to a libguestfs device.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.9)

   guestfs_ntfsclone_out_va
	int
	guestfs_ntfsclone_out_va (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *device,
				  const char *backupfile,
				  va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_ntfsclone_out".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_ntfsclone_out_argv
	int
	guestfs_ntfsclone_out_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				    const char *device,
				    const char *backupfile,
				    const struct guestfs_ntfsclone_out_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_ntfsclone_out".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_ntfsfix
	int
	guestfs_ntfsfix (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *device,
			 ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_NTFSFIX_CLEARBADSECTORS, int clearbadsectors,

       This command repairs some fundamental NTFS inconsistencies, resets the NTFS journal file,
       and schedules an NTFS consistency check for the first boot into Windows.

       This is not an equivalent of Windows "chkdsk".  It does not scan the filesystem for
       inconsistencies.

       The optional "clearbadsectors" flag clears the list of bad sectors.  This is useful after
       cloning a disk with bad sectors to a new disk.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.9)

   guestfs_ntfsfix_va
	int
	guestfs_ntfsfix_va (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *device,
			    va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_ntfsfix".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_ntfsfix_argv
	int
	guestfs_ntfsfix_argv (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *device,
			      const struct guestfs_ntfsfix_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_ntfsfix".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_ntfsresize
	int
	guestfs_ntfsresize (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *device);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_ntfsresize_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 1.3.2)

   guestfs_ntfsresize_opts
	int
	guestfs_ntfsresize_opts (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *device,
				 ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_NTFSRESIZE_OPTS_SIZE, int64_t size,
	GUESTFS_NTFSRESIZE_OPTS_FORCE, int force,

       This command resizes an NTFS filesystem, expanding or shrinking it to the size of the
       underlying device.

       The optional parameters are:

       "size"
	   The new size (in bytes) of the filesystem.  If omitted, the filesystem is resized to
	   fit the container (eg. partition).

       "force"
	   If this option is true, then force the resize of the filesystem even if the filesystem
	   is marked as requiring a consistency check.

	   After the resize operation, the filesystem is always marked as requiring a consistency
	   check (for safety).	You have to boot into Windows to perform this check and clear
	   this condition.  If you don't set the "force" option then it is not possible to call
	   "guestfs_ntfsresize" multiple times on a single filesystem without booting into
	   Windows between each resize.

       See also ntfsresize(8).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.11.15)

   guestfs_ntfsresize_opts_va
	int
	guestfs_ntfsresize_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
				    const char *device,
				    va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_ntfsresize_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_ntfsresize_opts_argv
	int
	guestfs_ntfsresize_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				      const char *device,
				      const struct guestfs_ntfsresize_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_ntfsresize_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_ntfsresize_size
	int
	guestfs_ntfsresize_size (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *device,
				 int64_t size);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_ntfsresize" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This command is the same as "guestfs_ntfsresize" except that it allows you to specify the
       new size (in bytes) explicitly.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.14)

   guestfs_parse_environment
	int
	guestfs_parse_environment (guestfs_h *g);

       Parse the program's environment and set flags in the handle accordingly.  For example if
       "LIBGUESTFS_DEBUG=1" then the 'verbose' flag is set in the handle.

       Most programs do not need to call this.	It is done implicitly when you call
       "guestfs_create".

       See "ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES" in guestfs(3) for a list of environment variables that can
       affect libguestfs handles.  See also "guestfs_create_flags" in guestfs(3), and
       "guestfs_parse_environment_list".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.53)

   guestfs_parse_environment_list
	int
	guestfs_parse_environment_list (guestfs_h *g,
					char *const *environment);

       Parse the list of strings in the argument "environment" and set flags in the handle
       accordingly.  For example if "LIBGUESTFS_DEBUG=1" is a string in the list, then the
       'verbose' flag is set in the handle.

       This is the same as "guestfs_parse_environment" except that it parses an explicit list of
       strings instead of the program's environment.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.53)

   guestfs_part_add
	int
	guestfs_part_add (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *device,
			  const char *prlogex,
			  int64_t startsect,
			  int64_t endsect);

       This command adds a partition to "device".  If there is no partition table on the device,
       call "guestfs_part_init" first.

       The "prlogex" parameter is the type of partition.  Normally you should pass "p" or
       "primary" here, but MBR partition tables also support "l" (or "logical") and "e" (or
       "extended") partition types.

       "startsect" and "endsect" are the start and end of the partition in sectors.  "endsect"
       may be negative, which means it counts backwards from the end of the disk ("-1" is the
       last sector).

       Creating a partition which covers the whole disk is not so easy.  Use "guestfs_part_disk"
       to do that.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.78)

   guestfs_part_del
	int
	guestfs_part_del (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *device,
			  int partnum);

       This command deletes the partition numbered "partnum" on "device".

       Note that in the case of MBR partitioning, deleting an extended partition also deletes any
       logical partitions it contains.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.2)

   guestfs_part_disk
	int
	guestfs_part_disk (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *device,
			   const char *parttype);

       This command is simply a combination of "guestfs_part_init" followed by "guestfs_part_add"
       to create a single primary partition covering the whole disk.

       "parttype" is the partition table type, usually "mbr" or "gpt", but other possible values
       are described in "guestfs_part_init".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.78)

   guestfs_part_get_bootable
	int
	guestfs_part_get_bootable (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *device,
				   int partnum);

       This command returns true if the partition "partnum" on "device" has the bootable flag
       set.

       See also "guestfs_part_set_bootable".

       This function returns a C truth value on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.2)

   guestfs_part_get_gpt_type
	char *
	guestfs_part_get_gpt_type (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *device,
				   int partnum);

       Return the type GUID of numbered GPT partition "partnum". For MBR partitions, return an
       appropriate GUID corresponding to the MBR type. Behaviour is undefined for other partition
       types.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.21.1)

   guestfs_part_get_mbr_id
	int
	guestfs_part_get_mbr_id (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *device,
				 int partnum);

       Returns the MBR type byte (also known as the ID byte) from the numbered partition
       "partnum".

       Note that only MBR (old DOS-style) partitions have type bytes.  You will get undefined
       results for other partition table types (see "guestfs_part_get_parttype").

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.3.2)

   guestfs_part_get_parttype
	char *
	guestfs_part_get_parttype (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *device);

       This command examines the partition table on "device" and returns the partition table type
       (format) being used.

       Common return values include: "msdos" (a DOS/Windows style MBR partition table), "gpt" (a
       GPT/EFI-style partition table).	Other values are possible, although unusual.  See
       "guestfs_part_init" for a full list.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.78)

   guestfs_part_init
	int
	guestfs_part_init (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *device,
			   const char *parttype);

       This creates an empty partition table on "device" of one of the partition types listed
       below.  Usually "parttype" should be either "msdos" or "gpt" (for large disks).

       Initially there are no partitions.  Following this, you should call "guestfs_part_add" for
       each partition required.

       Possible values for "parttype" are:

       efi
       gpt Intel EFI / GPT partition table.

	   This is recommended for >= 2 TB partitions that will be accessed from Linux and Intel-
	   based Mac OS X.  It also has limited backwards compatibility with the "mbr" format.

       mbr
       msdos
	   The standard PC "Master Boot Record" (MBR) format used by MS-DOS and Windows.  This
	   partition type will only work for device sizes up to 2 TB.  For large disks we
	   recommend using "gpt".

       Other partition table types that may work but are not supported include:

       aix AIX disk labels.

       amiga
       rdb Amiga "Rigid Disk Block" format.

       bsd BSD disk labels.

       dasd
	   DASD, used on IBM mainframes.

       dvh MIPS/SGI volumes.

       mac Old Mac partition format.  Modern Macs use "gpt".

       pc98
	   NEC PC-98 format, common in Japan apparently.

       sun Sun disk labels.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.78)

   guestfs_part_list
	struct guestfs_partition_list *
	guestfs_part_list (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *device);

       This command parses the partition table on "device" and returns the list of partitions
       found.

       The fields in the returned structure are:

       part_num
	   Partition number, counting from 1.

       part_start
	   Start of the partition in bytes.  To get sectors you have to divide by the device's
	   sector size, see "guestfs_blockdev_getss".

       part_end
	   End of the partition in bytes.

       part_size
	   Size of the partition in bytes.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_partition_list *", or NULL if there was an error.
       The caller must call "guestfs_free_partition_list" after use.

       (Added in 1.0.78)

   guestfs_part_set_bootable
	int
	guestfs_part_set_bootable (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *device,
				   int partnum,
				   int bootable);

       This sets the bootable flag on partition numbered "partnum" on device "device".	Note that
       partitions are numbered from 1.

       The bootable flag is used by some operating systems (notably Windows) to determine which
       partition to boot from.	It is by no means universally recognized.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.78)

   guestfs_part_set_gpt_type
	int
	guestfs_part_set_gpt_type (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *device,
				   int partnum,
				   const char *guid);

       Set the type GUID of numbered GPT partition "partnum" to "guid". Return an error if the
       partition table of "device" isn't GPT, or if "guid" is not a valid GUID.

       See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table#Partition_type_GUIDs for a useful
       list of type GUIDs.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.21.1)

   guestfs_part_set_mbr_id
	int
	guestfs_part_set_mbr_id (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *device,
				 int partnum,
				 int idbyte);

       Sets the MBR type byte (also known as the ID byte) of the numbered partition "partnum" to
       "idbyte".  Note that the type bytes quoted in most documentation are in fact hexadecimal
       numbers, but usually documented without any leading "0x" which might be confusing.

       Note that only MBR (old DOS-style) partitions have type bytes.  You will get undefined
       results for other partition table types (see "guestfs_part_get_parttype").

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.2)

   guestfs_part_set_name
	int
	guestfs_part_set_name (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *device,
			       int partnum,
			       const char *name);

       This sets the partition name on partition numbered "partnum" on device "device".  Note
       that partitions are numbered from 1.

       The partition name can only be set on certain types of partition table.	This works on
       "gpt" but not on "mbr" partitions.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.78)

   guestfs_part_to_dev
	char *
	guestfs_part_to_dev (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *partition);

       This function takes a partition name (eg. "/dev/sdb1") and removes the partition number,
       returning the device name (eg. "/dev/sdb").

       The named partition must exist, for example as a string returned from
       "guestfs_list_partitions".

       See also "guestfs_part_to_partnum", "guestfs_device_index".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.5.15)

   guestfs_part_to_partnum
	int
	guestfs_part_to_partnum (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *partition);

       This function takes a partition name (eg. "/dev/sdb1") and returns the partition number
       (eg. 1).

       The named partition must exist, for example as a string returned from
       "guestfs_list_partitions".

       See also "guestfs_part_to_dev".

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.13.25)

   guestfs_ping_daemon
	int
	guestfs_ping_daemon (guestfs_h *g);

       This is a test probe into the guestfs daemon running inside the qemu subprocess.  Calling
       this function checks that the daemon responds to the ping message, without affecting the
       daemon or attached block device(s) in any other way.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.18)

   guestfs_pread
	char *
	guestfs_pread (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *path,
		       int count,
		       int64_t offset,
		       size_t *size_r);

       This command lets you read part of a file.  It reads "count" bytes of the file, starting
       at "offset", from file "path".

       This may read fewer bytes than requested.  For further details see the pread(2) system
       call.

       See also "guestfs_pwrite", "guestfs_pread_device".

       This function returns a buffer, or NULL on error.  The size of the returned buffer is
       written to *size_r.  The caller must free the returned buffer after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.77)

   guestfs_pread_device
	char *
	guestfs_pread_device (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *device,
			      int count,
			      int64_t offset,
			      size_t *size_r);

       This command lets you read part of a block device.  It reads "count" bytes of "device",
       starting at "offset".

       This may read fewer bytes than requested.  For further details see the pread(2) system
       call.

       See also "guestfs_pread".

       This function returns a buffer, or NULL on error.  The size of the returned buffer is
       written to *size_r.  The caller must free the returned buffer after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.5.21)

   guestfs_pvchange_uuid
	int
	guestfs_pvchange_uuid (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *device);

       Generate a new random UUID for the physical volume "device".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.26)

   guestfs_pvchange_uuid_all
	int
	guestfs_pvchange_uuid_all (guestfs_h *g);

       Generate new random UUIDs for all physical volumes.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.26)

   guestfs_pvcreate
	int
	guestfs_pvcreate (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *device);

       This creates an LVM physical volume on the named "device", where "device" should usually
       be a partition name such as "/dev/sda1".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_pvremove
	int
	guestfs_pvremove (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *device);

       This wipes a physical volume "device" so that LVM will no longer recognise it.

       The implementation uses the "pvremove" command which refuses to wipe physical volumes that
       contain any volume groups, so you have to remove those first.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.13)

   guestfs_pvresize
	int
	guestfs_pvresize (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *device);

       This resizes (expands or shrinks) an existing LVM physical volume to match the new size of
       the underlying device.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.26)

   guestfs_pvresize_size
	int
	guestfs_pvresize_size (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *device,
			       int64_t size);

       This command is the same as "guestfs_pvresize" except that it allows you to specify the
       new size (in bytes) explicitly.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.14)

   guestfs_pvs
	char **
	guestfs_pvs (guestfs_h *g);

       List all the physical volumes detected.	This is the equivalent of the pvs(8) command.

       This returns a list of just the device names that contain PVs (eg. "/dev/sda2").

       See also "guestfs_pvs_full".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 0.4)

   guestfs_pvs_full
	struct guestfs_lvm_pv_list *
	guestfs_pvs_full (guestfs_h *g);

       List all the physical volumes detected.	This is the equivalent of the pvs(8) command.
       The "full" version includes all fields.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_lvm_pv_list *", or NULL if there was an error.
       The caller must call "guestfs_free_lvm_pv_list" after use.

       (Added in 0.4)

   guestfs_pvuuid
	char *
	guestfs_pvuuid (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *device);

       This command returns the UUID of the LVM PV "device".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.87)

   guestfs_pwrite
	int
	guestfs_pwrite (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *path,
			const char *content,
			size_t content_size,
			int64_t offset);

       This command writes to part of a file.  It writes the data buffer "content" to the file
       "path" starting at offset "offset".

       This command implements the pwrite(2) system call, and like that system call it may not
       write the full data requested.  The return value is the number of bytes that were actually
       written to the file.  This could even be 0, although short writes are unlikely for regular
       files in ordinary circumstances.

       See also "guestfs_pread", "guestfs_pwrite_device".

       On error this function returns -1.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.3.14)

   guestfs_pwrite_device
	int
	guestfs_pwrite_device (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *device,
			       const char *content,
			       size_t content_size,
			       int64_t offset);

       This command writes to part of a device.  It writes the data buffer "content" to "device"
       starting at offset "offset".

       This command implements the pwrite(2) system call, and like that system call it may not
       write the full data requested (although short writes to disk devices and partitions are
       probably impossible with standard Linux kernels).

       See also "guestfs_pwrite".

       On error this function returns -1.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.5.20)

   guestfs_read_file
	char *
	guestfs_read_file (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *path,
			   size_t *size_r);

       This calls returns the contents of the file "path" as a buffer.

       Unlike "guestfs_cat", this function can correctly handle files that contain embedded ASCII
       NUL characters.

       This function returns a buffer, or NULL on error.  The size of the returned buffer is
       written to *size_r.  The caller must free the returned buffer after use.

       (Added in 1.0.63)

   guestfs_read_lines
	char **
	guestfs_read_lines (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *path);

       Return the contents of the file named "path".

       The file contents are returned as a list of lines.  Trailing "LF" and "CRLF" character
       sequences are not returned.

       Note that this function cannot correctly handle binary files (specifically, files
       containing "\0" character which is treated as end of string).  For those you need to use
       the "guestfs_read_file" function and split the buffer into lines yourself.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 0.7)

   guestfs_readdir
	struct guestfs_dirent_list *
	guestfs_readdir (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *dir);

       This returns the list of directory entries in directory "dir".

       All entries in the directory are returned, including "." and "..".  The entries are not
       sorted, but returned in the same order as the underlying filesystem.

       Also this call returns basic file type information about each file.  The "ftyp" field will
       contain one of the following characters:

       'b' Block special

       'c' Char special

       'd' Directory

       'f' FIFO (named pipe)

       'l' Symbolic link

       'r' Regular file

       's' Socket

       'u' Unknown file type

       '?' The readdir(3) call returned a "d_type" field with an unexpected value

       This function is primarily intended for use by programs.  To get a simple list of names,
       use "guestfs_ls".  To get a printable directory for human consumption, use "guestfs_ll".

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_dirent_list *", or NULL if there was an error.
       The caller must call "guestfs_free_dirent_list" after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.55)

   guestfs_readlink
	char *
	guestfs_readlink (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *path);

       This command reads the target of a symbolic link.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_readlinklist
	char **
	guestfs_readlinklist (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *path,
			      char *const *names);

       This call allows you to do a "readlink" operation on multiple files, where all files are
       in the directory "path".  "names" is the list of files from this directory.

       On return you get a list of strings, with a one-to-one correspondence to the "names" list.
       Each string is the value of the symbolic link.

       If the readlink(2) operation fails on any name, then the corresponding result string is
       the empty string "".  However the whole operation is completed even if there were
       readlink(2) errors, and so you can call this function with names where you don't know if
       they are symbolic links already (albeit slightly less efficient).

       This call is intended for programs that want to efficiently list a directory contents
       without making many round-trips.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.0.77)

   guestfs_realpath
	char *
	guestfs_realpath (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *path);

       Return the canonicalized absolute pathname of "path".  The returned path has no ".", ".."
       or symbolic link path elements.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_remount
	int
	guestfs_remount (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *mountpoint,
			 ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_REMOUNT_RW, int rw,

       This call allows you to change the "rw" (readonly/read-write) flag on an already mounted
       filesystem at "mountpoint", converting a readonly filesystem to be read-write, or vice-
       versa.

       Note that at the moment you must supply the "optional" "rw" parameter.  In future we may
       allow other flags to be adjusted.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

   guestfs_remount_va
	int
	guestfs_remount_va (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *mountpoint,
			    va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_remount".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_remount_argv
	int
	guestfs_remount_argv (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *mountpoint,
			      const struct guestfs_remount_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_remount".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_remove_drive
	int
	guestfs_remove_drive (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *label);

       This function is conceptually the opposite of "guestfs_add_drive_opts".	It removes the
       drive that was previously added with label "label".

       Note that in order to remove drives, you have to add them with labels (see the optional
       "label" argument to "guestfs_add_drive_opts").  If you didn't use a label, then they
       cannot be removed.

       You can call this function before or after launching the handle.  If called after launch,
       if the backend supports it, we try to hot unplug the drive: see "HOTPLUGGING" in
       guestfs(3).  The disk must not be in use (eg. mounted) when you do this.  We try to detect
       if the disk is in use and stop you from doing this.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.49)

   guestfs_removexattr
	int
	guestfs_removexattr (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *xattr,
			     const char *path);

       This call removes the extended attribute named "xattr" of the file "path".

       See also: "guestfs_lremovexattr", attr(5).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.59)

   guestfs_rename
	int
	guestfs_rename (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *oldpath,
			const char *newpath);

       Rename a file to a new place on the same filesystem.  This is the same as the Linux
       rename(2) system call.  In most cases you are better to use "guestfs_mv" instead.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.21.5)

   guestfs_resize2fs
	int
	guestfs_resize2fs (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *device);

       This resizes an ext2, ext3 or ext4 filesystem to match the size of the underlying device.

       See also "RESIZE2FS ERRORS" in guestfs(3).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.27)

   guestfs_resize2fs_M
	int
	guestfs_resize2fs_M (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *device);

       This command is the same as "guestfs_resize2fs", but the filesystem is resized to its
       minimum size.  This works like the -M option to the "resize2fs" command.

       To get the resulting size of the filesystem you should call "guestfs_tune2fs_l" and read
       the "Block size" and "Block count" values.  These two numbers, multiplied together, give
       the resulting size of the minimal filesystem in bytes.

       See also "RESIZE2FS ERRORS" in guestfs(3).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.9.4)

   guestfs_resize2fs_size
	int
	guestfs_resize2fs_size (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *device,
				int64_t size);

       This command is the same as "guestfs_resize2fs" except that it allows you to specify the
       new size (in bytes) explicitly.

       See also "RESIZE2FS ERRORS" in guestfs(3).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.14)

   guestfs_rm
	int
	guestfs_rm (guestfs_h *g,
		    const char *path);

       Remove the single file "path".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_rm_f
	int
	guestfs_rm_f (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *path);

       Remove the file "path".

       If the file doesn't exist, that error is ignored.  (Other errors, eg. I/O errors or bad
       paths, are not ignored)

       This call cannot remove directories.  Use "guestfs_rmdir" to remove an empty directory, or
       "guestfs_rm_rf" to remove directories recursively.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.42)

   guestfs_rm_rf
	int
	guestfs_rm_rf (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *path);

       Remove the file or directory "path", recursively removing the contents if its a directory.
       This is like the "rm -rf" shell command.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_rmdir
	int
	guestfs_rmdir (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *path);

       Remove the single directory "path".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_rmmountpoint
	int
	guestfs_rmmountpoint (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *exemptpath);

       This calls removes a mountpoint that was previously created with "guestfs_mkmountpoint".
       See "guestfs_mkmountpoint" for full details.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.62)

   guestfs_rsync
	int
	guestfs_rsync (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *src,
		       const char *dest,
		       ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_RSYNC_ARCHIVE, int archive,
	GUESTFS_RSYNC_DELETEDEST, int deletedest,

       This call may be used to copy or synchronize two directories under the same libguestfs
       handle.	This uses the rsync(1) program which uses a fast algorithm that avoids copying
       files unnecessarily.

       "src" and "dest" are the source and destination directories.  Files are copied from "src"
       to "dest".

       The optional arguments are:

       "archive"
	   Turns on archive mode.  This is the same as passing the --archive flag to "rsync".

       "deletedest"
	   Delete files at the destination that do not exist at the source.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.29)

   guestfs_rsync_va
	int
	guestfs_rsync_va (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *src,
			  const char *dest,
			  va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_rsync".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_rsync_argv
	int
	guestfs_rsync_argv (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *src,
			    const char *dest,
			    const struct guestfs_rsync_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_rsync".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_rsync_in
	int
	guestfs_rsync_in (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *remote,
			  const char *dest,
			  ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_RSYNC_IN_ARCHIVE, int archive,
	GUESTFS_RSYNC_IN_DELETEDEST, int deletedest,

       This call may be used to copy or synchronize the filesystem on the host or on a remote
       computer with the filesystem within libguestfs.	This uses the rsync(1) program which uses
       a fast algorithm that avoids copying files unnecessarily.

       This call only works if the network is enabled.	See "guestfs_set_network" or the
       --network option to various tools like guestfish(1).

       Files are copied from the remote server and directory specified by "remote" to the
       destination directory "dest".

       The format of the remote server string is defined by rsync(1).  Note that there is no way
       to supply a password or passphrase so the target must be set up not to require one.

       The optional arguments are the same as those of "guestfs_rsync".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.29)

   guestfs_rsync_in_va
	int
	guestfs_rsync_in_va (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *remote,
			     const char *dest,
			     va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_rsync_in".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_rsync_in_argv
	int
	guestfs_rsync_in_argv (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *remote,
			       const char *dest,
			       const struct guestfs_rsync_in_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_rsync_in".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_rsync_out
	int
	guestfs_rsync_out (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *src,
			   const char *remote,
			   ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_RSYNC_OUT_ARCHIVE, int archive,
	GUESTFS_RSYNC_OUT_DELETEDEST, int deletedest,

       This call may be used to copy or synchronize the filesystem within libguestfs with a
       filesystem on the host or on a remote computer.	This uses the rsync(1) program which uses
       a fast algorithm that avoids copying files unnecessarily.

       This call only works if the network is enabled.	See "guestfs_set_network" or the
       --network option to various tools like guestfish(1).

       Files are copied from the source directory "src" to the remote server and directory
       specified by "remote".

       The format of the remote server string is defined by rsync(1).  Note that there is no way
       to supply a password or passphrase so the target must be set up not to require one.

       The optional arguments are the same as those of "guestfs_rsync".

       Globbing does not happen on the "src" parameter.  In programs which use the API directly
       you have to expand wildcards yourself (see "guestfs_glob_expand").  In guestfish you can
       use the "glob" command (see "glob" in guestfish(1)), for example:

	><fs> glob rsync-out /* rsync://remote/

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.29)

   guestfs_rsync_out_va
	int
	guestfs_rsync_out_va (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *src,
			      const char *remote,
			      va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_rsync_out".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_rsync_out_argv
	int
	guestfs_rsync_out_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *src,
				const char *remote,
				const struct guestfs_rsync_out_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_rsync_out".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_scrub_device
	int
	guestfs_scrub_device (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *device);

       This command writes patterns over "device" to make data retrieval more difficult.

       It is an interface to the scrub(1) program.  See that manual page for more details.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.52)

   guestfs_scrub_file
	int
	guestfs_scrub_file (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *file);

       This command writes patterns over a file to make data retrieval more difficult.

       The file is removed after scrubbing.

       It is an interface to the scrub(1) program.  See that manual page for more details.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.52)

   guestfs_scrub_freespace
	int
	guestfs_scrub_freespace (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *dir);

       This command creates the directory "dir" and then fills it with files until the filesystem
       is full, and scrubs the files as for "guestfs_scrub_file", and deletes them.  The
       intention is to scrub any free space on the partition containing "dir".

       It is an interface to the scrub(1) program.  See that manual page for more details.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.52)

   guestfs_set_append
	int
	guestfs_set_append (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *append);

       This function is used to add additional options to the guest kernel command line.

       The default is "NULL" unless overridden by setting "LIBGUESTFS_APPEND" environment
       variable.

       Setting "append" to "NULL" means no additional options are passed (libguestfs always adds
       a few of its own).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.26)

   guestfs_set_attach_method
	int
	guestfs_set_attach_method (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *backend);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_set_backend" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       Set the method that libguestfs uses to connect to the backend guestfsd daemon.

       See "BACKEND" in guestfs(3).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.9.8)

   guestfs_set_autosync
	int
	guestfs_set_autosync (guestfs_h *g,
			      int autosync);

       If "autosync" is true, this enables autosync.  Libguestfs will make a best effort attempt
       to make filesystems consistent and synchronized when the handle is closed (also if the
       program exits without closing handles).

       This is enabled by default (since libguestfs 1.5.24, previously it was disabled by
       default).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_set_backend
	int
	guestfs_set_backend (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *backend);

       Set the method that libguestfs uses to connect to the backend guestfsd daemon.

       This handle property was previously called the "attach method".

       See "BACKEND" in guestfs(3).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.21.26)

   guestfs_set_cachedir
	int
	guestfs_set_cachedir (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *cachedir);

       Set the directory used by the handle to store the appliance cache, when using a supermin
       appliance.  The appliance is cached and shared between all handles which have the same
       effective user ID.

       The environment variables "LIBGUESTFS_CACHEDIR" and "TMPDIR" control the default value: If
       "LIBGUESTFS_CACHEDIR" is set, then that is the default.	Else if "TMPDIR" is set, then
       that is the default.  Else "/var/tmp" is the default.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.58)

   guestfs_set_direct
	int
	guestfs_set_direct (guestfs_h *g,
			    int direct);

       If the direct appliance mode flag is enabled, then stdin and stdout are passed directly
       through to the appliance once it is launched.

       One consequence of this is that log messages aren't caught by the library and handled by
       "guestfs_set_log_message_callback", but go straight to stdout.

       You probably don't want to use this unless you know what you are doing.

       The default is disabled.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.72)

   guestfs_set_e2attrs
	int
	guestfs_set_e2attrs (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *file,
			     const char *attrs,
			     ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_SET_E2ATTRS_CLEAR, int clear,

       This sets or clears the file attributes "attrs" associated with the inode "file".

       "attrs" is a string of characters representing file attributes.	See "guestfs_get_e2attrs"
       for a list of possible attributes.  Not all attributes can be changed.

       If optional boolean "clear" is not present or false, then the "attrs" listed are set in
       the inode.

       If "clear" is true, then the "attrs" listed are cleared in the inode.

       In both cases, other attributes not present in the "attrs" string are left unchanged.

       These attributes are only present when the file is located on an ext2/3/4 filesystem.
       Using this call on other filesystem types will result in an error.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.31)

   guestfs_set_e2attrs_va
	int
	guestfs_set_e2attrs_va (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *file,
				const char *attrs,
				va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_set_e2attrs".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_set_e2attrs_argv
	int
	guestfs_set_e2attrs_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *file,
				  const char *attrs,
				  const struct guestfs_set_e2attrs_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_set_e2attrs".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_set_e2generation
	int
	guestfs_set_e2generation (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *file,
				  int64_t generation);

       This sets the ext2 file generation of a file.

       See "guestfs_get_e2generation".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.31)

   guestfs_set_e2label
	int
	guestfs_set_e2label (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *device,
			     const char *label);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_set_label" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This sets the ext2/3/4 filesystem label of the filesystem on "device" to "label".
       Filesystem labels are limited to 16 characters.

       You can use either "guestfs_tune2fs_l" or "guestfs_get_e2label" to return the existing
       label on a filesystem.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.15)

   guestfs_set_e2uuid
	int
	guestfs_set_e2uuid (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *device,
			    const char *uuid);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_set_uuid" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This sets the ext2/3/4 filesystem UUID of the filesystem on "device" to "uuid".	The
       format of the UUID and alternatives such as "clear", "random" and "time" are described in
       the tune2fs(8) manpage.

       You can use "guestfs_vfs_uuid" to return the existing UUID of a filesystem.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.15)

   guestfs_set_label
	int
	guestfs_set_label (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *mountable,
			   const char *label);

       Set the filesystem label on "mountable" to "label".

       Only some filesystem types support labels, and libguestfs supports setting labels on only
       a subset of these.

       ext2, ext3, ext4
	   Labels are limited to 16 bytes.

       NTFS
	   Labels are limited to 128 unicode characters.

       XFS The label is limited to 12 bytes.  The filesystem must not be mounted when trying to
	   set the label.

       btrfs
	   The label is limited to 256 bytes and some characters are not allowed.  Setting the
	   label on a btrfs subvolume will set the label on its parent filesystem.  The
	   filesystem must not be mounted when trying to set the label.

       To read the label on a filesystem, call "guestfs_vfs_label".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.9)

   guestfs_set_libvirt_requested_credential
	int
	guestfs_set_libvirt_requested_credential (guestfs_h *g,
						  int index,
						  const char *cred,
						  size_t cred_size);

       After requesting the "index"'th credential from the user, call this function to pass the
       answer back to libvirt.

       See "LIBVIRT AUTHENTICATION" in guestfs(3) for documentation and example code.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.52)

   guestfs_set_libvirt_supported_credentials
	int
	guestfs_set_libvirt_supported_credentials (guestfs_h *g,
						   char *const *creds);

       Call this function before setting an event handler for "GUESTFS_EVENT_LIBVIRT_AUTH", to
       supply the list of credential types that the program knows how to process.

       The "creds" list must be a non-empty list of strings.  Possible strings are:

       "username"
       "authname"
       "language"
       "cnonce"
       "passphrase"
       "echoprompt"
       "noechoprompt"
       "realm"
       "external"

       See libvirt documentation for the meaning of these credential types.

       See "LIBVIRT AUTHENTICATION" in guestfs(3) for documentation and example code.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.52)

   guestfs_set_memsize
	int
	guestfs_set_memsize (guestfs_h *g,
			     int memsize);

       This sets the memory size in megabytes allocated to the qemu subprocess.  This only has
       any effect if called before "guestfs_launch".

       You can also change this by setting the environment variable "LIBGUESTFS_MEMSIZE" before
       the handle is created.

       For more information on the architecture of libguestfs, see guestfs(3).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.55)

   guestfs_set_network
	int
	guestfs_set_network (guestfs_h *g,
			     int network);

       If "network" is true, then the network is enabled in the libguestfs appliance.  The
       default is false.

       This affects whether commands are able to access the network (see "RUNNING COMMANDS" in
       guestfs(3)).

       You must call this before calling "guestfs_launch", otherwise it has no effect.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.5.4)

   guestfs_set_path
	int
	guestfs_set_path (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *searchpath);

       Set the path that libguestfs searches for kernel and initrd.img.

       The default is "$libdir/guestfs" unless overridden by setting "LIBGUESTFS_PATH"
       environment variable.

       Setting "path" to "NULL" restores the default path.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_set_pgroup
	int
	guestfs_set_pgroup (guestfs_h *g,
			    int pgroup);

       If "pgroup" is true, child processes are placed into their own process group.

       The practical upshot of this is that signals like "SIGINT" (from users pressing "^C")
       won't be received by the child process.

       The default for this flag is false, because usually you want "^C" to kill the subprocess.
       Guestfish sets this flag to true when used interactively, so that "^C" can cancel long-
       running commands gracefully (see "guestfs_user_cancel").

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.11.18)

   guestfs_set_program
	int
	guestfs_set_program (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *program);

       Set the program name.  This is an informative string which the main program may optionally
       set in the handle.

       When the handle is created, the program name in the handle is set to the basename from
       "argv[0]".  If that was not possible, it is set to the empty string (but never "NULL").

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.21.29)

   guestfs_set_qemu
	int
	guestfs_set_qemu (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *qemu);

       Set the qemu binary that we will use.

       The default is chosen when the library was compiled by the configure script.

       You can also override this by setting the "LIBGUESTFS_QEMU" environment variable.

       Setting "qemu" to "NULL" restores the default qemu binary.

       Note that you should call this function as early as possible after creating the handle.
       This is because some pre-launch operations depend on testing qemu features (by running
       "qemu -help").  If the qemu binary changes, we don't retest features, and so you might see
       inconsistent results.  Using the environment variable "LIBGUESTFS_QEMU" is safest of all
       since that picks the qemu binary at the same time as the handle is created.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.6)

   guestfs_set_recovery_proc
	int
	guestfs_set_recovery_proc (guestfs_h *g,
				   int recoveryproc);

       If this is called with the parameter "false" then "guestfs_launch" does not create a
       recovery process.  The purpose of the recovery process is to stop runaway qemu processes
       in the case where the main program aborts abruptly.

       This only has any effect if called before "guestfs_launch", and the default is true.

       About the only time when you would want to disable this is if the main process will fork
       itself into the background ("daemonize" itself).  In this case the recovery process thinks
       that the main program has disappeared and so kills qemu, which is not very helpful.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.77)

   guestfs_set_selinux
	int
	guestfs_set_selinux (guestfs_h *g,
			     int selinux);

       This sets the selinux flag that is passed to the appliance at boot time.  The default is
       "selinux=0" (disabled).

       Note that if SELinux is enabled, it is always in Permissive mode ("enforcing=0").

       For more information on the architecture of libguestfs, see guestfs(3).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.67)

   guestfs_set_smp
	int
	guestfs_set_smp (guestfs_h *g,
			 int smp);

       Change the number of virtual CPUs assigned to the appliance.  The default is 1.
       Increasing this may improve performance, though often it has no effect.

       This function must be called before "guestfs_launch".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.13.15)

   guestfs_set_tmpdir
	int
	guestfs_set_tmpdir (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *tmpdir);

       Set the directory used by the handle to store temporary files.

       The environment variables "LIBGUESTFS_TMPDIR" and "TMPDIR" control the default value: If
       "LIBGUESTFS_TMPDIR" is set, then that is the default.  Else if "TMPDIR" is set, then that
       is the default.	Else "/tmp" is the default.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.58)

   guestfs_set_trace
	int
	guestfs_set_trace (guestfs_h *g,
			   int trace);

       If the command trace flag is set to 1, then libguestfs calls, parameters and return values
       are traced.

       If you want to trace C API calls into libguestfs (and other libraries) then possibly a
       better way is to use the external ltrace(1) command.

       Command traces are disabled unless the environment variable "LIBGUESTFS_TRACE" is defined
       and set to 1.

       Trace messages are normally sent to "stderr", unless you register a callback to send them
       somewhere else (see "guestfs_set_event_callback").

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.69)

   guestfs_set_uuid
	int
	guestfs_set_uuid (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *device,
			  const char *uuid);

       Set the filesystem UIUD on "device" to "label".

       Only some filesystem types support setting UUIDs.

       To read the UUID on a filesystem, call "guestfs_vfs_uuid".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

   guestfs_set_verbose
	int
	guestfs_set_verbose (guestfs_h *g,
			     int verbose);

       If "verbose" is true, this turns on verbose messages.

       Verbose messages are disabled unless the environment variable "LIBGUESTFS_DEBUG" is
       defined and set to 1.

       Verbose messages are normally sent to "stderr", unless you register a callback to send
       them somewhere else (see "guestfs_set_event_callback").

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_setcon
	int
	guestfs_setcon (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *context);

       This sets the SELinux security context of the daemon to the string "context".

       See the documentation about SELINUX in guestfs(3).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.67)

   guestfs_setxattr
	int
	guestfs_setxattr (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *xattr,
			  const char *val,
			  int vallen,
			  const char *path);

       This call sets the extended attribute named "xattr" of the file "path" to the value "val"
       (of length "vallen").  The value is arbitrary 8 bit data.

       See also: "guestfs_lsetxattr", attr(5).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.59)

   guestfs_sfdisk
	int
	guestfs_sfdisk (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *device,
			int cyls,
			int heads,
			int sectors,
			char *const *lines);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_part_add" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This is a direct interface to the sfdisk(8) program for creating partitions on block
       devices.

       "device" should be a block device, for example "/dev/sda".

       "cyls", "heads" and "sectors" are the number of cylinders, heads and sectors on the
       device, which are passed directly to sfdisk as the -C, -H and -S parameters.  If you pass
       0 for any of these, then the corresponding parameter is omitted.  Usually for 'large'
       disks, you can just pass 0 for these, but for small (floppy-sized) disks, sfdisk (or
       rather, the kernel) cannot work out the right geometry and you will need to tell it.

       "lines" is a list of lines that we feed to "sfdisk".  For more information refer to the
       sfdisk(8) manpage.

       To create a single partition occupying the whole disk, you would pass "lines" as a single
       element list, when the single element being the string "," (comma).

       See also: "guestfs_sfdisk_l", "guestfs_sfdisk_N", "guestfs_part_init"

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_sfdiskM
	int
	guestfs_sfdiskM (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *device,
			 char *const *lines);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_part_add" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This is a simplified interface to the "guestfs_sfdisk" command, where partition sizes are
       specified in megabytes only (rounded to the nearest cylinder) and you don't need to
       specify the cyls, heads and sectors parameters which were rarely if ever used anyway.

       See also: "guestfs_sfdisk", the sfdisk(8) manpage and "guestfs_part_disk"

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.55)

   guestfs_sfdisk_N
	int
	guestfs_sfdisk_N (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *device,
			  int partnum,
			  int cyls,
			  int heads,
			  int sectors,
			  const char *line);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_part_add" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This runs sfdisk(8) option to modify just the single partition "n" (note: "n" counts from
       1).

       For other parameters, see "guestfs_sfdisk".  You should usually pass 0 for the
       cyls/heads/sectors parameters.

       See also: "guestfs_part_add"

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.26)

   guestfs_sfdisk_disk_geometry
	char *
	guestfs_sfdisk_disk_geometry (guestfs_h *g,
				      const char *device);

       This displays the disk geometry of "device" read from the partition table.  Especially in
       the case where the underlying block device has been resized, this can be different from
       the kernel's idea of the geometry (see "guestfs_sfdisk_kernel_geometry").

       The result is in human-readable format, and not designed to be parsed.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.26)

   guestfs_sfdisk_kernel_geometry
	char *
	guestfs_sfdisk_kernel_geometry (guestfs_h *g,
					const char *device);

       This displays the kernel's idea of the geometry of "device".

       The result is in human-readable format, and not designed to be parsed.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.26)

   guestfs_sfdisk_l
	char *
	guestfs_sfdisk_l (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *device);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_part_list" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This displays the partition table on "device", in the human-readable output of the
       sfdisk(8) command.  It is not intended to be parsed.

       See also: "guestfs_part_list"

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.26)

   guestfs_sh
	char *
	guestfs_sh (guestfs_h *g,
		    const char *command);

       This call runs a command from the guest filesystem via the guest's "/bin/sh".

       This is like "guestfs_command", but passes the command to:

	/bin/sh -c "command"

       Depending on the guest's shell, this usually results in wildcards being expanded, shell
       expressions being interpolated and so on.

       All the provisos about "guestfs_command" apply to this call.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.50)

   guestfs_sh_lines
	char **
	guestfs_sh_lines (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *command);

       This is the same as "guestfs_sh", but splits the result into a list of lines.

       See also: "guestfs_command_lines"

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.0.50)

   guestfs_shutdown
	int
	guestfs_shutdown (guestfs_h *g);

       This is the opposite of "guestfs_launch".  It performs an orderly shutdown of the backend
       process(es).  If the autosync flag is set (which is the default) then the disk image is
       synchronized.

       If the subprocess exits with an error then this function will return an error, which
       should not be ignored (it may indicate that the disk image could not be written out
       properly).

       It is safe to call this multiple times.	Extra calls are ignored.

       This call does not close or free up the handle.	You still need to call "guestfs_close"
       afterwards.

       "guestfs_close" will call this if you don't do it explicitly, but note that any errors are
       ignored in that case.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.16)

   guestfs_sleep
	int
	guestfs_sleep (guestfs_h *g,
		       int secs);

       Sleep for "secs" seconds.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.41)

   guestfs_stat
	struct guestfs_stat *
	guestfs_stat (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *path);

       Returns file information for the given "path".

       This is the same as the stat(2) system call.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_stat *", or NULL if there was an error.	The
       caller must call "guestfs_free_stat" after use.

       (Added in 0.9.2)

   guestfs_statvfs
	struct guestfs_statvfs *
	guestfs_statvfs (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *path);

       Returns file system statistics for any mounted file system.  "path" should be a file or
       directory in the mounted file system (typically it is the mount point itself, but it
       doesn't need to be).

       This is the same as the statvfs(2) system call.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_statvfs *", or NULL if there was an error.  The
       caller must call "guestfs_free_statvfs" after use.

       (Added in 0.9.2)

   guestfs_strings
	char **
	guestfs_strings (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *path);

       This runs the strings(1) command on a file and returns the list of printable strings
       found.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.22)

   guestfs_strings_e
	char **
	guestfs_strings_e (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *encoding,
			   const char *path);

       This is like the "guestfs_strings" command, but allows you to specify the encoding of
       strings that are looked for in the source file "path".

       Allowed encodings are:

       s   Single 7-bit-byte characters like ASCII and the ASCII-compatible parts of ISO-8859-X
	   (this is what "guestfs_strings" uses).

       S   Single 8-bit-byte characters.

       b   16-bit big endian strings such as those encoded in UTF-16BE or UCS-2BE.

       l (lower case letter L)
	   16-bit little endian such as UTF-16LE and UCS-2LE.  This is useful for examining
	   binaries in Windows guests.

       B   32-bit big endian such as UCS-4BE.

       L   32-bit little endian such as UCS-4LE.

       The returned strings are transcoded to UTF-8.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.22)

   guestfs_swapoff_device
	int
	guestfs_swapoff_device (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *device);

       This command disables the libguestfs appliance swap device or partition named "device".
       See "guestfs_swapon_device".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_swapoff_file
	int
	guestfs_swapoff_file (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *file);

       This command disables the libguestfs appliance swap on file.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_swapoff_label
	int
	guestfs_swapoff_label (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *label);

       This command disables the libguestfs appliance swap on labeled swap partition.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_swapoff_uuid
	int
	guestfs_swapoff_uuid (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *uuid);

       This command disables the libguestfs appliance swap partition with the given UUID.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_swapon_device
	int
	guestfs_swapon_device (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *device);

       This command enables the libguestfs appliance to use the swap device or partition named
       "device".  The increased memory is made available for all commands, for example those run
       using "guestfs_command" or "guestfs_sh".

       Note that you should not swap to existing guest swap partitions unless you know what you
       are doing.  They may contain hibernation information, or other information that the guest
       doesn't want you to trash.  You also risk leaking information about the host to the guest
       this way.  Instead, attach a new host device to the guest and swap on that.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_swapon_file
	int
	guestfs_swapon_file (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *file);

       This command enables swap to a file.  See "guestfs_swapon_device" for other notes.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_swapon_label
	int
	guestfs_swapon_label (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *label);

       This command enables swap to a labeled swap partition.  See "guestfs_swapon_device" for
       other notes.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_swapon_uuid
	int
	guestfs_swapon_uuid (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *uuid);

       This command enables swap to a swap partition with the given UUID.  See
       "guestfs_swapon_device" for other notes.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_sync
	int
	guestfs_sync (guestfs_h *g);

       This syncs the disk, so that any writes are flushed through to the underlying disk image.

       You should always call this if you have modified a disk image, before closing the handle.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_syslinux
	int
	guestfs_syslinux (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *device,
			  ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_SYSLINUX_DIRECTORY, const char *directory,

       Install the SYSLINUX bootloader on "device".

       The device parameter must be either a whole disk formatted as a FAT filesystem, or a
       partition formatted as a FAT filesystem.  In the latter case, the partition should be
       marked as "active" ("guestfs_part_set_bootable") and a Master Boot Record must be
       installed (eg. using "guestfs_pwrite_device") on the first sector of the whole disk.  The
       SYSLINUX package comes with some suitable Master Boot Records.  See the syslinux(1) man
       page for further information.

       The optional arguments are:

       "directory"
	   Install SYSLINUX in the named subdirectory, instead of in the root directory of the
	   FAT filesystem.

       Additional configuration can be supplied to SYSLINUX by placing a file called
       "syslinux.cfg" on the FAT filesystem, either in the root directory, or under "directory"
       if that optional argument is being used.  For further information about the contents of
       this file, see syslinux(1).

       See also "guestfs_extlinux".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.21.27)

   guestfs_syslinux_va
	int
	guestfs_syslinux_va (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *device,
			     va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_syslinux".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_syslinux_argv
	int
	guestfs_syslinux_argv (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *device,
			       const struct guestfs_syslinux_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_syslinux".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_tail
	char **
	guestfs_tail (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *path);

       This command returns up to the last 10 lines of a file as a list of strings.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.54)

   guestfs_tail_n
	char **
	guestfs_tail_n (guestfs_h *g,
			int nrlines,
			const char *path);

       If the parameter "nrlines" is a positive number, this returns the last "nrlines" lines of
       the file "path".

       If the parameter "nrlines" is a negative number, this returns lines from the file "path",
       starting with the "-nrlines"th line.

       If the parameter "nrlines" is zero, this returns an empty list.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.54)

   guestfs_tar_in
	int
	guestfs_tar_in (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *tarfile,
			const char *directory);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_tar_in_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 1.0.3)

   guestfs_tar_in_opts
	int
	guestfs_tar_in_opts (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *tarfile,
			     const char *directory,
			     ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_TAR_IN_OPTS_COMPRESS, const char *compress,

       This command uploads and unpacks local file "tarfile" into "directory".

       The optional "compress" flag controls compression.  If not given, then the input should be
       an uncompressed tar file.  Otherwise one of the following strings may be given to select
       the compression type of the input file: "compress", "gzip", "bzip2", "xz", "lzop".  (Note
       that not all builds of libguestfs will support all of these compression types).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.30)

   guestfs_tar_in_opts_va
	int
	guestfs_tar_in_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *tarfile,
				const char *directory,
				va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_tar_in_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_tar_in_opts_argv
	int
	guestfs_tar_in_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *tarfile,
				  const char *directory,
				  const struct guestfs_tar_in_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_tar_in_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_tar_out
	int
	guestfs_tar_out (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *directory,
			 const char *tarfile);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_tar_out_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 1.0.3)

   guestfs_tar_out_opts
	int
	guestfs_tar_out_opts (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *directory,
			      const char *tarfile,
			      ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_TAR_OUT_OPTS_COMPRESS, const char *compress,
	GUESTFS_TAR_OUT_OPTS_NUMERICOWNER, int numericowner,
	GUESTFS_TAR_OUT_OPTS_EXCLUDES, char *const *excludes,

       This command packs the contents of "directory" and downloads it to local file "tarfile".

       The optional "compress" flag controls compression.  If not given, then the output will be
       an uncompressed tar file.  Otherwise one of the following strings may be given to select
       the compression type of the output file: "compress", "gzip", "bzip2", "xz", "lzop".  (Note
       that not all builds of libguestfs will support all of these compression types).

       The other optional arguments are:

       "excludes"
	   A list of wildcards.  Files are excluded if they match any of the wildcards.

       "numericowner"
	   If set to true, the output tar file will contain UID/GID numbers instead of user/group
	   names.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.30)

   guestfs_tar_out_opts_va
	int
	guestfs_tar_out_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *directory,
				 const char *tarfile,
				 va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_tar_out_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_tar_out_opts_argv
	int
	guestfs_tar_out_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				   const char *directory,
				   const char *tarfile,
				   const struct guestfs_tar_out_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_tar_out_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_tgz_in
	int
	guestfs_tgz_in (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *tarball,
			const char *directory);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_tar_in" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This command uploads and unpacks local file "tarball" (a gzip compressed tar file) into
       "directory".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.3)

   guestfs_tgz_out
	int
	guestfs_tgz_out (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *directory,
			 const char *tarball);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_tar_out" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This command packs the contents of "directory" and downloads it to local file "tarball".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.3)

   guestfs_touch
	int
	guestfs_touch (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *path);

       Touch acts like the touch(1) command.  It can be used to update the timestamps on a file,
       or, if the file does not exist, to create a new zero-length file.

       This command only works on regular files, and will fail on other file types such as
       directories, symbolic links, block special etc.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_truncate
	int
	guestfs_truncate (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *path);

       This command truncates "path" to a zero-length file.  The file must exist already.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.77)

   guestfs_truncate_size
	int
	guestfs_truncate_size (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *path,
			       int64_t size);

       This command truncates "path" to size "size" bytes.  The file must exist already.

       If the current file size is less than "size" then the file is extended to the required
       size with zero bytes.  This creates a sparse file (ie. disk blocks are not allocated for
       the file until you write to it).  To create a non-sparse file of zeroes, use
       "guestfs_fallocate64" instead.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.77)

   guestfs_tune2fs
	int
	guestfs_tune2fs (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *device,
			 ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_TUNE2FS_FORCE, int force,
	GUESTFS_TUNE2FS_MAXMOUNTCOUNT, int maxmountcount,
	GUESTFS_TUNE2FS_MOUNTCOUNT, int mountcount,
	GUESTFS_TUNE2FS_ERRORBEHAVIOR, const char *errorbehavior,
	GUESTFS_TUNE2FS_GROUP, int64_t group,
	GUESTFS_TUNE2FS_INTERVALBETWEENCHECKS, int intervalbetweenchecks,
	GUESTFS_TUNE2FS_RESERVEDBLOCKSPERCENTAGE, int reservedblockspercentage,
	GUESTFS_TUNE2FS_LASTMOUNTEDDIRECTORY, const char *lastmounteddirectory,
	GUESTFS_TUNE2FS_RESERVEDBLOCKSCOUNT, int64_t reservedblockscount,
	GUESTFS_TUNE2FS_USER, int64_t user,

       This call allows you to adjust various filesystem parameters of an ext2/ext3/ext4
       filesystem called "device".

       The optional parameters are:

       "force"
	   Force tune2fs to complete the operation even in the face of errors.	This is the same
	   as the tune2fs "-f" option.

       "maxmountcount"
	   Set the number of mounts after which the filesystem is checked by e2fsck(8).  If this
	   is 0 then the number of mounts is disregarded.  This is the same as the tune2fs "-c"
	   option.

       "mountcount"
	   Set the number of times the filesystem has been mounted.  This is the same as the
	   tune2fs "-C" option.

       "errorbehavior"
	   Change the behavior of the kernel code when errors are detected.  Possible values
	   currently are: "continue", "remount-ro", "panic".  In practice these options don't
	   really make any difference, particularly for write errors.

	   This is the same as the tune2fs "-e" option.

       "group"
	   Set the group which can use reserved filesystem blocks.  This is the same as the
	   tune2fs "-g" option except that it can only be specified as a number.

       "intervalbetweenchecks"
	   Adjust the maximal time between two filesystem checks (in seconds).	If the option is
	   passed as 0 then time-dependent checking is disabled.

	   This is the same as the tune2fs "-i" option.

       "reservedblockspercentage"
	   Set the percentage of the filesystem which may only be allocated by privileged
	   processes.  This is the same as the tune2fs "-m" option.

       "lastmounteddirectory"
	   Set the last mounted directory.  This is the same as the tune2fs "-M" option.

       "reservedblockscount" Set the number of reserved filesystem blocks. This is the same as
       the tune2fs "-r" option.
       "user"
	   Set the user who can use the reserved filesystem blocks.  This is the same as the
	   tune2fs "-u" option except that it can only be specified as a number.

       To get the current values of filesystem parameters, see "guestfs_tune2fs_l".  For precise
       details of how tune2fs works, see the tune2fs(8) man page.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.15.4)

   guestfs_tune2fs_va
	int
	guestfs_tune2fs_va (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *device,
			    va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_tune2fs".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_tune2fs_argv
	int
	guestfs_tune2fs_argv (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *device,
			      const struct guestfs_tune2fs_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_tune2fs".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_tune2fs_l
	char **
	guestfs_tune2fs_l (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *device);

       This returns the contents of the ext2, ext3 or ext4 filesystem superblock on "device".

       It is the same as running "tune2fs -l device".  See tune2fs(8) manpage for more details.
       The list of fields returned isn't clearly defined, and depends on both the version of
       "tune2fs" that libguestfs was built against, and the filesystem itself.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings, or NULL if there was an error.
       The array of strings will always have length "2n+1", where "n" keys and values alternate,
       followed by the trailing NULL entry.  The caller must free the strings and the array after
       use.

       (Added in 0.9.2)

   guestfs_txz_in
	int
	guestfs_txz_in (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *tarball,
			const char *directory);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_tar_in" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This command uploads and unpacks local file "tarball" (an xz compressed tar file) into
       "directory".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.2)

   guestfs_txz_out
	int
	guestfs_txz_out (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *directory,
			 const char *tarball);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_tar_out" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This command packs the contents of "directory" and downloads it to local file "tarball"
       (as an xz compressed tar archive).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.2)

   guestfs_umask
	int
	guestfs_umask (guestfs_h *g,
		       int mask);

       This function sets the mask used for creating new files and device nodes to "mask & 0777".

       Typical umask values would be 022 which creates new files with permissions like
       "-rw-r--r--" or "-rwxr-xr-x", and 002 which creates new files with permissions like
       "-rw-rw-r--" or "-rwxrwxr-x".

       The default umask is 022.  This is important because it means that directories and device
       nodes will be created with 0644 or 0755 mode even if you specify 0777.

       See also "guestfs_get_umask", umask(2), "guestfs_mknod", "guestfs_mkdir".

       This call returns the previous umask.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.0.55)

   guestfs_umount
	int
	guestfs_umount (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *pathordevice);

       This function is provided for backwards compatibility with earlier versions of libguestfs.
       It simply calls "guestfs_umount_opts" with no optional arguments.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_umount_opts
	int
	guestfs_umount_opts (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *pathordevice,
			     ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_UMOUNT_OPTS_FORCE, int force,
	GUESTFS_UMOUNT_OPTS_LAZYUNMOUNT, int lazyunmount,

       This unmounts the given filesystem.  The filesystem may be specified either by its
       mountpoint (path) or the device which contains the filesystem.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.25)

   guestfs_umount_opts_va
	int
	guestfs_umount_opts_va (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *pathordevice,
				va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_umount_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_umount_opts_argv
	int
	guestfs_umount_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				  const char *pathordevice,
				  const struct guestfs_umount_opts_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_umount_opts".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_umount_all
	int
	guestfs_umount_all (guestfs_h *g);

       This unmounts all mounted filesystems.

       Some internal mounts are not unmounted by this call.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_umount_local
	int
	guestfs_umount_local (guestfs_h *g,
			      ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_UMOUNT_LOCAL_RETRY, int retry,

       If libguestfs is exporting the filesystem on a local mountpoint, then this unmounts it.

       See "MOUNT LOCAL" in guestfs(3) for full documentation.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.22)

   guestfs_umount_local_va
	int
	guestfs_umount_local_va (guestfs_h *g,
				 va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_umount_local".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_umount_local_argv
	int
	guestfs_umount_local_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				   const struct guestfs_umount_local_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_umount_local".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_upload
	int
	guestfs_upload (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *filename,
			const char *remotefilename);

       Upload local file "filename" to "remotefilename" on the filesystem.

       "filename" can also be a named pipe.

       See also "guestfs_download".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.2)

   guestfs_upload_offset
	int
	guestfs_upload_offset (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *filename,
			       const char *remotefilename,
			       int64_t offset);

       Upload local file "filename" to "remotefilename" on the filesystem.

       "remotefilename" is overwritten starting at the byte "offset" specified.  The intention is
       to overwrite parts of existing files or devices, although if a non-existant file is
       specified then it is created with a "hole" before "offset".  The size of the data written
       is implicit in the size of the source "filename".

       Note that there is no limit on the amount of data that can be uploaded with this call,
       unlike with "guestfs_pwrite", and this call always writes the full amount unless an error
       occurs.

       See also "guestfs_upload", "guestfs_pwrite".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.5.17)

   guestfs_user_cancel
	int
	guestfs_user_cancel (guestfs_h *g);

       This function cancels the current upload or download operation.

       Unlike most other libguestfs calls, this function is signal safe and thread safe.  You can
       call it from a signal handler or from another thread, without needing to do any locking.

       The transfer that was in progress (if there is one) will stop shortly afterwards, and will
       return an error.  The errno (see "guestfs_last_errno") is set to "EINTR", so you can test
       for this to find out if the operation was cancelled or failed because of another error.

       No cleanup is performed: for example, if a file was being uploaded then after cancellation
       there may be a partially uploaded file.	It is the caller's responsibility to clean up if
       necessary.

       There are two common places that you might call "guestfs_user_cancel":

       In an interactive text-based program, you might call it from a "SIGINT" signal handler so
       that pressing "^C" cancels the current operation.  (You also need to call
       "guestfs_set_pgroup" so that child processes don't receive the "^C" signal).

       In a graphical program, when the main thread is displaying a progress bar with a cancel
       button, wire up the cancel button to call this function.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.11.18)

   guestfs_utimens
	int
	guestfs_utimens (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *path,
			 int64_t atsecs,
			 int64_t atnsecs,
			 int64_t mtsecs,
			 int64_t mtnsecs);

       This command sets the timestamps of a file with nanosecond precision.

       "atsecs, atnsecs" are the last access time (atime) in secs and nanoseconds from the epoch.

       "mtsecs, mtnsecs" are the last modification time (mtime) in secs and nanoseconds from the
       epoch.

       If the *nsecs field contains the special value "-1" then the corresponding timestamp is
       set to the current time.  (The *secs field is ignored in this case).

       If the *nsecs field contains the special value "-2" then the corresponding timestamp is
       left unchanged.	(The *secs field is ignored in this case).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.77)

   guestfs_utsname
	struct guestfs_utsname *
	guestfs_utsname (guestfs_h *g);

       This returns the kernel version of the appliance, where this is available.  This
       information is only useful for debugging.  Nothing in the returned structure is defined by
       the API.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_utsname *", or NULL if there was an error.  The
       caller must call "guestfs_free_utsname" after use.

       (Added in 1.19.27)

   guestfs_version
	struct guestfs_version *
	guestfs_version (guestfs_h *g);

       Return the libguestfs version number that the program is linked against.

       Note that because of dynamic linking this is not necessarily the version of libguestfs
       that you compiled against.  You can compile the program, and then at runtime dynamically
       link against a completely different "libguestfs.so" library.

       This call was added in version 1.0.58.  In previous versions of libguestfs there was no
       way to get the version number.  From C code you can use dynamic linker functions to find
       out if this symbol exists (if it doesn't, then it's an earlier version).

       The call returns a structure with four elements.  The first three ("major", "minor" and
       "release") are numbers and correspond to the usual version triplet.  The fourth element
       ("extra") is a string and is normally empty, but may be used for distro-specific
       information.

       To construct the original version string: "$major.$minor.$release$extra"

       See also: "LIBGUESTFS VERSION NUMBERS" in guestfs(3).

       Note: Don't use this call to test for availability of features.	In enterprise
       distributions we backport features from later versions into earlier versions, making this
       an unreliable way to test for features.	Use "guestfs_available" or
       "guestfs_feature_available" instead.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_version *", or NULL if there was an error.  The
       caller must call "guestfs_free_version" after use.

       (Added in 1.0.58)

   guestfs_vfs_label
	char *
	guestfs_vfs_label (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *mountable);

       This returns the label of the filesystem on "mountable".

       If the filesystem is unlabeled, this returns the empty string.

       To find a filesystem from the label, use "guestfs_findfs_label".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.3.18)

   guestfs_vfs_type
	char *
	guestfs_vfs_type (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *mountable);

       This command gets the filesystem type corresponding to the filesystem on "mountable".

       For most filesystems, the result is the name of the Linux VFS module which would be used
       to mount this filesystem if you mounted it without specifying the filesystem type.  For
       example a string such as "ext3" or "ntfs".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.75)

   guestfs_vfs_uuid
	char *
	guestfs_vfs_uuid (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *mountable);

       This returns the filesystem UUID of the filesystem on "mountable".

       If the filesystem does not have a UUID, this returns the empty string.

       To find a filesystem from the UUID, use "guestfs_findfs_uuid".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.3.18)

   guestfs_vg_activate
	int
	guestfs_vg_activate (guestfs_h *g,
			     int activate,
			     char *const *volgroups);

       This command activates or (if "activate" is false) deactivates all logical volumes in the
       listed volume groups "volgroups".

       This command is the same as running "vgchange -a y|n volgroups..."

       Note that if "volgroups" is an empty list then all volume groups are activated or
       deactivated.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.26)

   guestfs_vg_activate_all
	int
	guestfs_vg_activate_all (guestfs_h *g,
				 int activate);

       This command activates or (if "activate" is false) deactivates all logical volumes in all
       volume groups.

       This command is the same as running "vgchange -a y|n"

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.26)

   guestfs_vgchange_uuid
	int
	guestfs_vgchange_uuid (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *vg);

       Generate a new random UUID for the volume group "vg".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.26)

   guestfs_vgchange_uuid_all
	int
	guestfs_vgchange_uuid_all (guestfs_h *g);

       Generate new random UUIDs for all volume groups.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.26)

   guestfs_vgcreate
	int
	guestfs_vgcreate (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *volgroup,
			  char *const *physvols);

       This creates an LVM volume group called "volgroup" from the non-empty list of physical
       volumes "physvols".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_vglvuuids
	char **
	guestfs_vglvuuids (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *vgname);

       Given a VG called "vgname", this returns the UUIDs of all the logical volumes created in
       this volume group.

       You can use this along with "guestfs_lvs" and "guestfs_lvuuid" calls to associate logical
       volumes and volume groups.

       See also "guestfs_vgpvuuids".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.0.87)

   guestfs_vgmeta
	char *
	guestfs_vgmeta (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *vgname,
			size_t *size_r);

       "vgname" is an LVM volume group.  This command examines the volume group and returns its
       metadata.

       Note that the metadata is an internal structure used by LVM, subject to change at any
       time, and is provided for information only.

       This function returns a buffer, or NULL on error.  The size of the returned buffer is
       written to *size_r.  The caller must free the returned buffer after use.

       (Added in 1.17.20)

   guestfs_vgpvuuids
	char **
	guestfs_vgpvuuids (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *vgname);

       Given a VG called "vgname", this returns the UUIDs of all the physical volumes that this
       volume group resides on.

       You can use this along with "guestfs_pvs" and "guestfs_pvuuid" calls to associate physical
       volumes and volume groups.

       See also "guestfs_vglvuuids".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 1.0.87)

   guestfs_vgremove
	int
	guestfs_vgremove (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *vgname);

       Remove an LVM volume group "vgname", (for example "VG").

       This also forcibly removes all logical volumes in the volume group (if any).

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.13)

   guestfs_vgrename
	int
	guestfs_vgrename (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *volgroup,
			  const char *newvolgroup);

       Rename a volume group "volgroup" with the new name "newvolgroup".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.83)

   guestfs_vgs
	char **
	guestfs_vgs (guestfs_h *g);

       List all the volumes groups detected.  This is the equivalent of the vgs(8) command.

       This returns a list of just the volume group names that were detected (eg. "VolGroup00").

       See also "guestfs_vgs_full".

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       (Added in 0.4)

   guestfs_vgs_full
	struct guestfs_lvm_vg_list *
	guestfs_vgs_full (guestfs_h *g);

       List all the volumes groups detected.  This is the equivalent of the vgs(8) command.  The
       "full" version includes all fields.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_lvm_vg_list *", or NULL if there was an error.
       The caller must call "guestfs_free_lvm_vg_list" after use.

       (Added in 0.4)

   guestfs_vgscan
	int
	guestfs_vgscan (guestfs_h *g);

       This rescans all block devices and rebuilds the list of LVM physical volumes, volume
       groups and logical volumes.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.2)

   guestfs_vguuid
	char *
	guestfs_vguuid (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *vgname);

       This command returns the UUID of the LVM VG named "vgname".

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.87)

   guestfs_wait_ready
	int
	guestfs_wait_ready (guestfs_h *g);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_launch" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This function is a no op.

       In versions of the API < 1.0.71 you had to call this function just after calling
       "guestfs_launch" to wait for the launch to complete.  However this is no longer necessary
       because "guestfs_launch" now does the waiting.

       If you see any calls to this function in code then you can just remove them, unless you
       want to retain compatibility with older versions of the API.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 0.3)

   guestfs_wc_c
	int
	guestfs_wc_c (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *path);

       This command counts the characters in a file, using the "wc -c" external command.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.0.54)

   guestfs_wc_l
	int
	guestfs_wc_l (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *path);

       This command counts the lines in a file, using the "wc -l" external command.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.0.54)

   guestfs_wc_w
	int
	guestfs_wc_w (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *path);

       This command counts the words in a file, using the "wc -w" external command.

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.0.54)

   guestfs_wipefs
	int
	guestfs_wipefs (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *device);

       This command erases filesystem or RAID signatures from the specified "device" to make the
       filesystem invisible to libblkid.

       This does not erase the filesystem itself nor any other data from the "device".

       Compare with "guestfs_zero" which zeroes the first few blocks of a device.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.17.6)

   guestfs_write
	int
	guestfs_write (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *path,
		       const char *content,
		       size_t content_size);

       This call creates a file called "path".	The content of the file is the string "content"
       (which can contain any 8 bit data).

       See also "guestfs_write_append".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.3.14)

   guestfs_write_append
	int
	guestfs_write_append (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *path,
			      const char *content,
			      size_t content_size);

       This call appends "content" to the end of file "path".  If "path" does not exist, then a
       new file is created.

       See also "guestfs_write".

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.11.18)

   guestfs_write_file
	int
	guestfs_write_file (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *path,
			    const char *content,
			    int size);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_write" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This call creates a file called "path".	The contents of the file is the string "content"
       (which can contain any 8 bit data), with length "size".

       As a special case, if "size" is 0 then the length is calculated using "strlen" (so in this
       case the content cannot contain embedded ASCII NULs).

       NB. Owing to a bug, writing content containing ASCII NUL characters does not work, even if
       the length is specified.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 0.8)

   guestfs_xfs_admin
	int
	guestfs_xfs_admin (guestfs_h *g,
			   const char *device,
			   ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_XFS_ADMIN_EXTUNWRITTEN, int extunwritten,
	GUESTFS_XFS_ADMIN_IMGFILE, int imgfile,
	GUESTFS_XFS_ADMIN_V2LOG, int v2log,
	GUESTFS_XFS_ADMIN_PROJID32BIT, int projid32bit,
	GUESTFS_XFS_ADMIN_LAZYCOUNTER, int lazycounter,
	GUESTFS_XFS_ADMIN_LABEL, const char *label,
	GUESTFS_XFS_ADMIN_UUID, const char *uuid,

       Change the parameters of the XFS filesystem on "device".

       Devices that are mounted cannot be modified.  Administrators must unmount filesystems
       before this call can modify parameters.

       Some of the parameters of a mounted filesystem can be examined and modified using the
       "guestfs_xfs_info" and "guestfs_xfs_growfs" calls.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.33)

   guestfs_xfs_admin_va
	int
	guestfs_xfs_admin_va (guestfs_h *g,
			      const char *device,
			      va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_xfs_admin".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_xfs_admin_argv
	int
	guestfs_xfs_admin_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				const char *device,
				const struct guestfs_xfs_admin_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_xfs_admin".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_xfs_growfs
	int
	guestfs_xfs_growfs (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *path,
			    ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_XFS_GROWFS_DATASEC, int datasec,
	GUESTFS_XFS_GROWFS_LOGSEC, int logsec,
	GUESTFS_XFS_GROWFS_RTSEC, int rtsec,
	GUESTFS_XFS_GROWFS_DATASIZE, int64_t datasize,
	GUESTFS_XFS_GROWFS_LOGSIZE, int64_t logsize,
	GUESTFS_XFS_GROWFS_RTSIZE, int64_t rtsize,
	GUESTFS_XFS_GROWFS_RTEXTSIZE, int64_t rtextsize,
	GUESTFS_XFS_GROWFS_MAXPCT, int maxpct,

       Grow the XFS filesystem mounted at "path".

       The returned struct contains geometry information.  Missing fields are returned as "-1"
       (for numeric fields) or empty string.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.19.28)

   guestfs_xfs_growfs_va
	int
	guestfs_xfs_growfs_va (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *path,
			       va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_xfs_growfs".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_xfs_growfs_argv
	int
	guestfs_xfs_growfs_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *path,
				 const struct guestfs_xfs_growfs_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_xfs_growfs".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_xfs_info
	struct guestfs_xfsinfo *
	guestfs_xfs_info (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *pathordevice);

       "pathordevice" is a mounted XFS filesystem or a device containing an XFS filesystem.  This
       command returns the geometry of the filesystem.

       The returned struct contains geometry information.  Missing fields are returned as "-1"
       (for numeric fields) or empty string.

       This function returns a "struct guestfs_xfsinfo *", or NULL if there was an error.  The
       caller must call "guestfs_free_xfsinfo" after use.

       (Added in 1.19.21)

   guestfs_xfs_repair
	int
	guestfs_xfs_repair (guestfs_h *g,
			    const char *device,
			    ...);

       You may supply a list of optional arguments to this call.  Use zero or more of the
       following pairs of parameters, and terminate the list with "-1" on its own.  See "CALLS
       WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

	GUESTFS_XFS_REPAIR_FORCELOGZERO, int forcelogzero,
	GUESTFS_XFS_REPAIR_NOMODIFY, int nomodify,
	GUESTFS_XFS_REPAIR_NOPREFETCH, int noprefetch,
	GUESTFS_XFS_REPAIR_FORCEGEOMETRY, int forcegeometry,
	GUESTFS_XFS_REPAIR_MAXMEM, int64_t maxmem,
	GUESTFS_XFS_REPAIR_IHASHSIZE, int64_t ihashsize,
	GUESTFS_XFS_REPAIR_BHASHSIZE, int64_t bhashsize,
	GUESTFS_XFS_REPAIR_AGSTRIDE, int64_t agstride,
	GUESTFS_XFS_REPAIR_LOGDEV, const char *logdev,
	GUESTFS_XFS_REPAIR_RTDEV, const char *rtdev,

       Repair corrupt or damaged XFS filesystem on "device".

       The filesystem is specified using the "device" argument which should be the device name of
       the disk partition or volume containing the filesystem.	If given the name of a block
       device, "xfs_repair" will attempt to find the raw device associated with the specified
       block device and will use the raw device instead.

       Regardless, the filesystem to be repaired must be unmounted, otherwise, the resulting
       filesystem may be inconsistent or corrupt.

       The returned status indicates whether filesystem corruption was detected (returns 1) or
       was not detected (returns 0).

       On error this function returns -1.

       (Added in 1.19.36)

   guestfs_xfs_repair_va
	int
	guestfs_xfs_repair_va (guestfs_h *g,
			       const char *device,
			       va_list args);

       This is the "va_list variant" of "guestfs_xfs_repair".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_xfs_repair_argv
	int
	guestfs_xfs_repair_argv (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *device,
				 const struct guestfs_xfs_repair_argv *optargs);

       This is the "argv variant" of "guestfs_xfs_repair".

       See "CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS".

   guestfs_zegrep
	char **
	guestfs_zegrep (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *regex,
			const char *path);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_grep" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This calls the external "zegrep" program and returns the matching lines.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_zegrepi
	char **
	guestfs_zegrepi (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *regex,
			 const char *path);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_grep" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This calls the external "zegrep -i" program and returns the matching lines.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_zero
	int
	guestfs_zero (guestfs_h *g,
		      const char *device);

       This command writes zeroes over the first few blocks of "device".

       How many blocks are zeroed isn't specified (but it's not enough to securely wipe the
       device).  It should be sufficient to remove any partition tables, filesystem superblocks
       and so on.

       If blocks are already zero, then this command avoids writing zeroes.  This prevents the
       underlying device from becoming non-sparse or growing unnecessarily.

       See also: "guestfs_zero_device", "guestfs_scrub_device", "guestfs_is_zero_device"

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.16)

   guestfs_zero_device
	int
	guestfs_zero_device (guestfs_h *g,
			     const char *device);

       This command writes zeroes over the entire "device".  Compare with "guestfs_zero" which
       just zeroes the first few blocks of a device.

       If blocks are already zero, then this command avoids writing zeroes.  This prevents the
       underlying device from becoming non-sparse or growing unnecessarily.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.3.1)

   guestfs_zero_free_space
	int
	guestfs_zero_free_space (guestfs_h *g,
				 const char *directory);

       Zero the free space in the filesystem mounted on "directory".  The filesystem must be
       mounted read-write.

       The filesystem contents are not affected, but any free space in the filesystem is freed.

       Free space is not "trimmed".  You may want to call "guestfs_fstrim" either as an
       alternative to this, or after calling this, depending on your requirements.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       This long-running command can generate progress notification messages so that the caller
       can display a progress bar or indicator.  To receive these messages, the caller must
       register a progress event callback.  See "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.17.18)

   guestfs_zerofree
	int
	guestfs_zerofree (guestfs_h *g,
			  const char *device);

       This runs the zerofree program on "device".  This program claims to zero unused inodes and
       disk blocks on an ext2/3 filesystem, thus making it possible to compress the filesystem
       more effectively.

       You should not run this program if the filesystem is mounted.

       It is possible that using this program can damage the filesystem or data on the
       filesystem.

       This function returns 0 on success or -1 on error.

       (Added in 1.0.26)

   guestfs_zfgrep
	char **
	guestfs_zfgrep (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *pattern,
			const char *path);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_grep" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This calls the external "zfgrep" program and returns the matching lines.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_zfgrepi
	char **
	guestfs_zfgrepi (guestfs_h *g,
			 const char *pattern,
			 const char *path);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_grep" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This calls the external "zfgrep -i" program and returns the matching lines.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_zfile
	char *
	guestfs_zfile (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *meth,
		       const char *path);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_file" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This command runs "file" after first decompressing "path" using "method".

       "method" must be one of "gzip", "compress" or "bzip2".

       Since 1.0.63, use "guestfs_file" instead which can now process compressed files.

       This function returns a string, or NULL on error.  The caller must free the returned
       string after use.

       (Added in 1.0.59)

   guestfs_zgrep
	char **
	guestfs_zgrep (guestfs_h *g,
		       const char *regex,
		       const char *path);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_grep" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This calls the external "zgrep" program and returns the matching lines.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.66)

   guestfs_zgrepi
	char **
	guestfs_zgrepi (guestfs_h *g,
			const char *regex,
			const char *path);

       This function is deprecated.  In new code, use the "guestfs_grep" call instead.

       Deprecated functions will not be removed from the API, but the fact that they are
       deprecated indicates that there are problems with correct use of these functions.

       This calls the external "zgrep -i" program and returns the matching lines.

       This function returns a NULL-terminated array of strings (like environ(3)), or NULL if
       there was an error.  The caller must free the strings and the array after use.

       Because of the message protocol, there is a transfer limit of somewhere between 2MB and
       4MB.  See "PROTOCOL LIMITS" in guestfs(3).

       (Added in 1.0.66)

STRUCTURES
   guestfs_int_bool
	struct guestfs_int_bool {
	  int32_t i;
	  int32_t b;
	};

	struct guestfs_int_bool_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_int_bool *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_int_bool (struct guestfs_free_int_bool *);
	void guestfs_free_int_bool_list (struct guestfs_free_int_bool_list *);

   guestfs_lvm_pv
	struct guestfs_lvm_pv {
	  char *pv_name;
	  /* The next field is NOT nul-terminated, be careful when printing it: */
	  char pv_uuid[32];
	  char *pv_fmt;
	  uint64_t pv_size;
	  uint64_t dev_size;
	  uint64_t pv_free;
	  uint64_t pv_used;
	  char *pv_attr;
	  int64_t pv_pe_count;
	  int64_t pv_pe_alloc_count;
	  char *pv_tags;
	  uint64_t pe_start;
	  int64_t pv_mda_count;
	  uint64_t pv_mda_free;
	};

	struct guestfs_lvm_pv_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_lvm_pv *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_lvm_pv (struct guestfs_free_lvm_pv *);
	void guestfs_free_lvm_pv_list (struct guestfs_free_lvm_pv_list *);

   guestfs_lvm_vg
	struct guestfs_lvm_vg {
	  char *vg_name;
	  /* The next field is NOT nul-terminated, be careful when printing it: */
	  char vg_uuid[32];
	  char *vg_fmt;
	  char *vg_attr;
	  uint64_t vg_size;
	  uint64_t vg_free;
	  char *vg_sysid;
	  uint64_t vg_extent_size;
	  int64_t vg_extent_count;
	  int64_t vg_free_count;
	  int64_t max_lv;
	  int64_t max_pv;
	  int64_t pv_count;
	  int64_t lv_count;
	  int64_t snap_count;
	  int64_t vg_seqno;
	  char *vg_tags;
	  int64_t vg_mda_count;
	  uint64_t vg_mda_free;
	};

	struct guestfs_lvm_vg_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_lvm_vg *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_lvm_vg (struct guestfs_free_lvm_vg *);
	void guestfs_free_lvm_vg_list (struct guestfs_free_lvm_vg_list *);

   guestfs_lvm_lv
	struct guestfs_lvm_lv {
	  char *lv_name;
	  /* The next field is NOT nul-terminated, be careful when printing it: */
	  char lv_uuid[32];
	  char *lv_attr;
	  int64_t lv_major;
	  int64_t lv_minor;
	  int64_t lv_kernel_major;
	  int64_t lv_kernel_minor;
	  uint64_t lv_size;
	  int64_t seg_count;
	  char *origin;
	  /* The next field is [0..100] or -1 meaning 'not present': */
	  float snap_percent;
	  /* The next field is [0..100] or -1 meaning 'not present': */
	  float copy_percent;
	  char *move_pv;
	  char *lv_tags;
	  char *mirror_log;
	  char *modules;
	};

	struct guestfs_lvm_lv_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_lvm_lv *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_lvm_lv (struct guestfs_free_lvm_lv *);
	void guestfs_free_lvm_lv_list (struct guestfs_free_lvm_lv_list *);

   guestfs_stat
	struct guestfs_stat {
	  int64_t dev;
	  int64_t ino;
	  int64_t mode;
	  int64_t nlink;
	  int64_t uid;
	  int64_t gid;
	  int64_t rdev;
	  int64_t size;
	  int64_t blksize;
	  int64_t blocks;
	  int64_t atime;
	  int64_t mtime;
	  int64_t ctime;
	};

	struct guestfs_stat_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_stat *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_stat (struct guestfs_free_stat *);
	void guestfs_free_stat_list (struct guestfs_free_stat_list *);

   guestfs_statvfs
	struct guestfs_statvfs {
	  int64_t bsize;
	  int64_t frsize;
	  int64_t blocks;
	  int64_t bfree;
	  int64_t bavail;
	  int64_t files;
	  int64_t ffree;
	  int64_t favail;
	  int64_t fsid;
	  int64_t flag;
	  int64_t namemax;
	};

	struct guestfs_statvfs_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_statvfs *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_statvfs (struct guestfs_free_statvfs *);
	void guestfs_free_statvfs_list (struct guestfs_free_statvfs_list *);

   guestfs_dirent
	struct guestfs_dirent {
	  int64_t ino;
	  char ftyp;
	  char *name;
	};

	struct guestfs_dirent_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_dirent *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_dirent (struct guestfs_free_dirent *);
	void guestfs_free_dirent_list (struct guestfs_free_dirent_list *);

   guestfs_version
	struct guestfs_version {
	  int64_t major;
	  int64_t minor;
	  int64_t release;
	  char *extra;
	};

	struct guestfs_version_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_version *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_version (struct guestfs_free_version *);
	void guestfs_free_version_list (struct guestfs_free_version_list *);

   guestfs_xattr
	struct guestfs_xattr {
	  char *attrname;
	  /* The next two fields describe a byte array. */
	  uint32_t attrval_len;
	  char *attrval;
	};

	struct guestfs_xattr_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_xattr *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_xattr (struct guestfs_free_xattr *);
	void guestfs_free_xattr_list (struct guestfs_free_xattr_list *);

   guestfs_inotify_event
	struct guestfs_inotify_event {
	  int64_t in_wd;
	  uint32_t in_mask;
	  uint32_t in_cookie;
	  char *in_name;
	};

	struct guestfs_inotify_event_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_inotify_event *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_inotify_event (struct guestfs_free_inotify_event *);
	void guestfs_free_inotify_event_list (struct guestfs_free_inotify_event_list *);

   guestfs_partition
	struct guestfs_partition {
	  int32_t part_num;
	  uint64_t part_start;
	  uint64_t part_end;
	  uint64_t part_size;
	};

	struct guestfs_partition_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_partition *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_partition (struct guestfs_free_partition *);
	void guestfs_free_partition_list (struct guestfs_free_partition_list *);

   guestfs_application
	struct guestfs_application {
	  char *app_name;
	  char *app_display_name;
	  int32_t app_epoch;
	  char *app_version;
	  char *app_release;
	  char *app_install_path;
	  char *app_trans_path;
	  char *app_publisher;
	  char *app_url;
	  char *app_source_package;
	  char *app_summary;
	  char *app_description;
	};

	struct guestfs_application_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_application *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_application (struct guestfs_free_application *);
	void guestfs_free_application_list (struct guestfs_free_application_list *);

   guestfs_application2
	struct guestfs_application2 {
	  char *app2_name;
	  char *app2_display_name;
	  int32_t app2_epoch;
	  char *app2_version;
	  char *app2_release;
	  char *app2_arch;
	  char *app2_install_path;
	  char *app2_trans_path;
	  char *app2_publisher;
	  char *app2_url;
	  char *app2_source_package;
	  char *app2_summary;
	  char *app2_description;
	  char *app2_spare1;
	  char *app2_spare2;
	  char *app2_spare3;
	  char *app2_spare4;
	};

	struct guestfs_application2_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_application2 *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_application2 (struct guestfs_free_application2 *);
	void guestfs_free_application2_list (struct guestfs_free_application2_list *);

   guestfs_isoinfo
	struct guestfs_isoinfo {
	  char *iso_system_id;
	  char *iso_volume_id;
	  uint32_t iso_volume_space_size;
	  uint32_t iso_volume_set_size;
	  uint32_t iso_volume_sequence_number;
	  uint32_t iso_logical_block_size;
	  char *iso_volume_set_id;
	  char *iso_publisher_id;
	  char *iso_data_preparer_id;
	  char *iso_application_id;
	  char *iso_copyright_file_id;
	  char *iso_abstract_file_id;
	  char *iso_bibliographic_file_id;
	  int64_t iso_volume_creation_t;
	  int64_t iso_volume_modification_t;
	  int64_t iso_volume_expiration_t;
	  int64_t iso_volume_effective_t;
	};

	struct guestfs_isoinfo_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_isoinfo *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_isoinfo (struct guestfs_free_isoinfo *);
	void guestfs_free_isoinfo_list (struct guestfs_free_isoinfo_list *);

   guestfs_mdstat
	struct guestfs_mdstat {
	  char *mdstat_device;
	  int32_t mdstat_index;
	  char *mdstat_flags;
	};

	struct guestfs_mdstat_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_mdstat *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_mdstat (struct guestfs_free_mdstat *);
	void guestfs_free_mdstat_list (struct guestfs_free_mdstat_list *);

   guestfs_btrfssubvolume
	struct guestfs_btrfssubvolume {
	  uint64_t btrfssubvolume_id;
	  uint64_t btrfssubvolume_top_level_id;
	  char *btrfssubvolume_path;
	};

	struct guestfs_btrfssubvolume_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_btrfssubvolume *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_btrfssubvolume (struct guestfs_free_btrfssubvolume *);
	void guestfs_free_btrfssubvolume_list (struct guestfs_free_btrfssubvolume_list *);

   guestfs_xfsinfo
	struct guestfs_xfsinfo {
	  char *xfs_mntpoint;
	  uint32_t xfs_inodesize;
	  uint32_t xfs_agcount;
	  uint32_t xfs_agsize;
	  uint32_t xfs_sectsize;
	  uint32_t xfs_attr;
	  uint32_t xfs_blocksize;
	  uint64_t xfs_datablocks;
	  uint32_t xfs_imaxpct;
	  uint32_t xfs_sunit;
	  uint32_t xfs_swidth;
	  uint32_t xfs_dirversion;
	  uint32_t xfs_dirblocksize;
	  uint32_t xfs_cimode;
	  char *xfs_logname;
	  uint32_t xfs_logblocksize;
	  uint32_t xfs_logblocks;
	  uint32_t xfs_logversion;
	  uint32_t xfs_logsectsize;
	  uint32_t xfs_logsunit;
	  uint32_t xfs_lazycount;
	  char *xfs_rtname;
	  uint32_t xfs_rtextsize;
	  uint64_t xfs_rtblocks;
	  uint64_t xfs_rtextents;
	};

	struct guestfs_xfsinfo_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_xfsinfo *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_xfsinfo (struct guestfs_free_xfsinfo *);
	void guestfs_free_xfsinfo_list (struct guestfs_free_xfsinfo_list *);

   guestfs_utsname
	struct guestfs_utsname {
	  char *uts_sysname;
	  char *uts_release;
	  char *uts_version;
	  char *uts_machine;
	};

	struct guestfs_utsname_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_utsname *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_utsname (struct guestfs_free_utsname *);
	void guestfs_free_utsname_list (struct guestfs_free_utsname_list *);

   guestfs_hivex_node
	struct guestfs_hivex_node {
	  int64_t hivex_node_h;
	};

	struct guestfs_hivex_node_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_hivex_node *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_hivex_node (struct guestfs_free_hivex_node *);
	void guestfs_free_hivex_node_list (struct guestfs_free_hivex_node_list *);

   guestfs_hivex_value
	struct guestfs_hivex_value {
	  int64_t hivex_value_h;
	};

	struct guestfs_hivex_value_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_hivex_value *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_hivex_value (struct guestfs_free_hivex_value *);
	void guestfs_free_hivex_value_list (struct guestfs_free_hivex_value_list *);

   guestfs_internal_mountable
	struct guestfs_internal_mountable {
	  int32_t im_type;
	  char *im_device;
	  char *im_volume;
	};

	struct guestfs_internal_mountable_list {
	  uint32_t len; /* Number of elements in list. */
	  struct guestfs_internal_mountable *val; /* Elements. */
	};

	void guestfs_free_internal_mountable (struct guestfs_free_internal_mountable *);
	void guestfs_free_internal_mountable_list (struct guestfs_free_internal_mountable_list *);

AVAILABILITY
   GROUPS OF FUNCTIONALITY IN THE APPLIANCE
       Using "guestfs_available" you can test availability of the following groups of functions.
       This test queries the appliance to see if the appliance you are currently using supports
       the functionality.

       acl The following functions: "guestfs_acl_delete_def_file" "guestfs_acl_get_file"
	   "guestfs_acl_set_file"

       augeas
	   The following functions: "guestfs_aug_clear" "guestfs_aug_close" "guestfs_aug_defnode"
	   "guestfs_aug_defvar" "guestfs_aug_get" "guestfs_aug_init" "guestfs_aug_insert"
	   "guestfs_aug_load" "guestfs_aug_ls" "guestfs_aug_match" "guestfs_aug_mv"
	   "guestfs_aug_rm" "guestfs_aug_save" "guestfs_aug_set"

       btrfs
	   The following functions: "guestfs_btrfs_device_add" "guestfs_btrfs_device_delete"
	   "guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_balance" "guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_resize"
	   "guestfs_btrfs_filesystem_sync" "guestfs_btrfs_fsck" "guestfs_btrfs_set_seeding"
	   "guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_create" "guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_delete"
	   "guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_list" "guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_set_default"
	   "guestfs_btrfs_subvolume_snapshot" "guestfs_mkfs_btrfs"

       extlinux
	   The following functions: "guestfs_extlinux"

       fstrim
	   The following functions: "guestfs_fstrim"

       gdisk
	   The following functions: "guestfs_part_get_gpt_type" "guestfs_part_set_gpt_type"

       grub
	   The following functions: "guestfs_grub_install"

       hivex
	   The following functions: "guestfs_hivex_close" "guestfs_hivex_commit"
	   "guestfs_hivex_node_add_child" "guestfs_hivex_node_children"
	   "guestfs_hivex_node_delete_child" "guestfs_hivex_node_get_child"
	   "guestfs_hivex_node_get_value" "guestfs_hivex_node_name" "guestfs_hivex_node_parent"
	   "guestfs_hivex_node_set_value" "guestfs_hivex_node_values" "guestfs_hivex_open"
	   "guestfs_hivex_root" "guestfs_hivex_value_key" "guestfs_hivex_value_type"
	   "guestfs_hivex_value_value"

       inotify
	   The following functions: "guestfs_inotify_add_watch" "guestfs_inotify_close"
	   "guestfs_inotify_files" "guestfs_inotify_init" "guestfs_inotify_read"
	   "guestfs_inotify_rm_watch"

       ldm The following functions: "guestfs_ldmtool_create_all"
	   "guestfs_ldmtool_diskgroup_disks" "guestfs_ldmtool_diskgroup_name"
	   "guestfs_ldmtool_diskgroup_volumes" "guestfs_ldmtool_remove_all"
	   "guestfs_ldmtool_scan" "guestfs_ldmtool_scan_devices" "guestfs_ldmtool_volume_hint"
	   "guestfs_ldmtool_volume_partitions" "guestfs_ldmtool_volume_type"
	   "guestfs_list_ldm_partitions" "guestfs_list_ldm_volumes"

       linuxcaps
	   The following functions: "guestfs_cap_get_file" "guestfs_cap_set_file"

       linuxfsuuid
	   The following functions: "guestfs_mke2fs_JU" "guestfs_mke2journal_U"
	   "guestfs_mkswap_U" "guestfs_swapoff_uuid" "guestfs_swapon_uuid"

       linuxmodules
	   The following functions: "guestfs_modprobe"

       linuxxattrs
	   The following functions: "guestfs_getxattr" "guestfs_getxattrs"
	   "guestfs_internal_lxattrlist" "guestfs_lgetxattr" "guestfs_lgetxattrs"
	   "guestfs_lremovexattr" "guestfs_lsetxattr" "guestfs_removexattr" "guestfs_setxattr"

       luks
	   The following functions: "guestfs_luks_add_key" "guestfs_luks_close"
	   "guestfs_luks_format" "guestfs_luks_format_cipher" "guestfs_luks_kill_slot"
	   "guestfs_luks_open" "guestfs_luks_open_ro"

       lvm2
	   The following functions: "guestfs_lvcreate" "guestfs_lvcreate_free"
	   "guestfs_lvm_remove_all" "guestfs_lvm_set_filter" "guestfs_lvremove"
	   "guestfs_lvresize" "guestfs_lvresize_free" "guestfs_lvs" "guestfs_lvs_full"
	   "guestfs_pvchange_uuid" "guestfs_pvchange_uuid_all" "guestfs_pvcreate"
	   "guestfs_pvremove" "guestfs_pvresize" "guestfs_pvresize_size" "guestfs_pvs"
	   "guestfs_pvs_full" "guestfs_vg_activate" "guestfs_vg_activate_all"
	   "guestfs_vgchange_uuid" "guestfs_vgchange_uuid_all" "guestfs_vgcreate"
	   "guestfs_vgmeta" "guestfs_vgremove" "guestfs_vgs" "guestfs_vgs_full"

       mdadm
	   The following functions: "guestfs_md_create" "guestfs_md_detail" "guestfs_md_stat"
	   "guestfs_md_stop"

       mknod
	   The following functions: "guestfs_mkfifo" "guestfs_mknod" "guestfs_mknod_b"
	   "guestfs_mknod_c"

       ntfs3g
	   The following functions: "guestfs_ntfs_3g_probe" "guestfs_ntfsclone_in"
	   "guestfs_ntfsclone_out" "guestfs_ntfsfix"

       ntfsprogs
	   The following functions: "guestfs_ntfsresize" "guestfs_ntfsresize_size"

       realpath
	   The following functions: "guestfs_realpath"

       rsync
	   The following functions: "guestfs_rsync" "guestfs_rsync_in" "guestfs_rsync_out"

       scrub
	   The following functions: "guestfs_scrub_device" "guestfs_scrub_file"
	   "guestfs_scrub_freespace"

       selinux
	   The following functions: "guestfs_getcon" "guestfs_setcon"

       syslinux
	   The following functions: "guestfs_syslinux"

       wipefs
	   The following functions: "guestfs_wipefs"

       xfs The following functions: "guestfs_xfs_admin" "guestfs_xfs_growfs" "guestfs_xfs_info"
	   "guestfs_xfs_repair"

       xz  The following functions: "guestfs_txz_in" "guestfs_txz_out"

       zerofree
	   The following functions: "guestfs_zerofree"

   FILESYSTEM AVAILABLE
       The "guestfs_filesystem_available" call tests whether a filesystem type is supported by
       the appliance kernel.

       This is mainly useful as a negative test.  If this returns true, it doesn't mean that a
       particular filesystem can be mounted, since filesystems can fail for other reasons such as
       it being a later version of the filesystem, or having incompatible features.

   GUESTFISH supported COMMAND
       In guestfish(3) there is a handy interactive command "supported" which prints out the
       available groups and whether they are supported by this build of libguestfs.  Note however
       that you have to do "run" first.

   SINGLE CALLS AT COMPILE TIME
       Since version 1.5.8, "<guestfs.h>" defines symbols for each C API function, such as:

	#define GUESTFS_HAVE_DD 1

       if "guestfs_dd" is available.

       Before version 1.5.8, if you needed to test whether a single libguestfs function is
       available at compile time, we recommended using build tools such as autoconf or cmake.
       For example in autotools you could use:

	AC_CHECK_LIB([guestfs],[guestfs_create])
	AC_CHECK_FUNCS([guestfs_dd])

       which would result in "HAVE_GUESTFS_DD" being either defined or not defined in your
       program.

   SINGLE CALLS AT RUN TIME
       Testing at compile time doesn't guarantee that a function really exists in the library.
       The reason is that you might be dynamically linked against a previous libguestfs.so
       (dynamic library) which doesn't have the call.  This situation unfortunately results in a
       segmentation fault, which is a shortcoming of the C dynamic linking system itself.

       You can use dlopen(3) to test if a function is available at run time, as in this example
       program (note that you still need the compile time check as well):

	#include <stdio.h>
	#include <stdlib.h>
	#include <unistd.h>
	#include <dlfcn.h>
	#include <guestfs.h>

	main ()
	{
	#ifdef GUESTFS_HAVE_DD
	  void *dl;
	  int has_function;

	  /* Test if the function guestfs_dd is really available. */
	  dl = dlopen (NULL, RTLD_LAZY);
	  if (!dl) {
	    fprintf (stderr, "dlopen: %s\n", dlerror ());
	    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
	  }
	  has_function = dlsym (dl, "guestfs_dd") != NULL;
	  dlclose (dl);

	  if (!has_function)
	    printf ("this libguestfs.so does NOT have guestfs_dd function\n");
	  else {
	    printf ("this libguestfs.so has guestfs_dd function\n");
	    /* Now it's safe to call
	    guestfs_dd (g, "foo", "bar");
	    */
	  }
	#else
	  printf ("guestfs_dd function was not found at compile time\n");
	#endif
	 }

       You may think the above is an awful lot of hassle, and it is.  There are other ways
       outside of the C linking system to ensure that this kind of incompatibility never arises,
       such as using package versioning:

	Requires: libguestfs >= 1.0.80

CALLS WITH OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS
       A recent feature of the API is the introduction of calls which take optional arguments.
       In C these are declared 3 ways.	The main way is as a call which takes variable arguments
       (ie. "..."), as in this example:

	int guestfs_add_drive_opts (guestfs_h *g, const char *filename, ...);

       Call this with a list of optional arguments, terminated by "-1".  So to call with no
       optional arguments specified:

	guestfs_add_drive_opts (g, filename, -1);

       With a single optional argument:

	guestfs_add_drive_opts (g, filename,
				GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_FORMAT, "qcow2",
				-1);

       With two:

	guestfs_add_drive_opts (g, filename,
				GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_FORMAT, "qcow2",
				GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_READONLY, 1,
				-1);

       and so forth.  Don't forget the terminating "-1" otherwise Bad Things will happen!

   USING va_list FOR OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS
       The second variant has the same name with the suffix "_va", which works the same way but
       takes a "va_list".  See the C manual for details.  For the example function, this is
       declared:

	int guestfs_add_drive_opts_va (guestfs_h *g, const char *filename,
				       va_list args);

   CONSTRUCTING OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS
       The third variant is useful where you need to construct these calls.  You pass in a
       structure where you fill in the optional fields.  The structure has a bitmask as the first
       element which you must set to indicate which fields you have filled in.	For our example
       function the structure and call are declared:

	struct guestfs_add_drive_opts_argv {
	  uint64_t bitmask;
	  int readonly;
	  const char *format;
	  /* ... */
	};
	int guestfs_add_drive_opts_argv (guestfs_h *g, const char *filename,
		     const struct guestfs_add_drive_opts_argv *optargs);

       You could call it like this:

	struct guestfs_add_drive_opts_argv optargs = {
	  .bitmask = GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_READONLY_BITMASK |
		     GUESTFS_ADD_DRIVE_OPTS_FORMAT_BITMASK,
	  .readonly = 1,
	  .format = "qcow2"
	};

	guestfs_add_drive_opts_argv (g, filename, &optargs);

       Notes:

       o   The "_BITMASK" suffix on each option name when specifying the bitmask.

       o   You do not need to fill in all fields of the structure.

       o   There must be a one-to-one correspondence between fields of the structure that are
	   filled in, and bits set in the bitmask.

   OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS IN OTHER LANGUAGES
       In other languages, optional arguments are expressed in the way that is natural for that
       language.  We refer you to the language-specific documentation for more details on that.

       For guestfish, see "OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS" in guestfish(1).

EVENTS
   SETTING CALLBACKS TO HANDLE EVENTS
       Note: This section documents the generic event mechanism introduced in libguestfs 1.10,
       which you should use in new code if possible.  The old functions
       "guestfs_set_log_message_callback", "guestfs_set_subprocess_quit_callback",
       "guestfs_set_launch_done_callback", "guestfs_set_close_callback" and
       "guestfs_set_progress_callback" are no longer documented in this manual page.  Because of
       the ABI guarantee, the old functions continue to work.

       Handles generate events when certain things happen, such as log messages being generated,
       progress messages during long-running operations, or the handle being closed.  The API
       calls described below let you register a callback to be called when events happen.  You
       can register multiple callbacks (for the same, different or overlapping sets of events),
       and individually remove callbacks.  If callbacks are not removed, then they remain in
       force until the handle is closed.

       In the current implementation, events are only generated synchronously: that means that
       events (and hence callbacks) can only happen while you are in the middle of making another
       libguestfs call.  The callback is called in the same thread.

       Events may contain a payload, usually nothing (void), an array of 64 bit unsigned
       integers, or a message buffer.  Payloads are discussed later on.

   CLASSES OF EVENTS
       GUESTFS_EVENT_CLOSE (payload type: void)
	   The callback function will be called while the handle is being closed (synchronously
	   from "guestfs_close").

	   Note that libguestfs installs an atexit(3) handler to try to clean up handles that are
	   open when the program exits.  This means that this callback might be called indirectly
	   from exit(3), which can cause unexpected problems in higher-level languages (eg. if
	   your HLL interpreter has already been cleaned up by the time this is called, and if
	   your callback then jumps into some HLL function).

	   If no callback is registered: the handle is closed without any callback being invoked.

       GUESTFS_EVENT_SUBPROCESS_QUIT (payload type: void)
	   The callback function will be called when the child process quits, either
	   asynchronously or if killed by "guestfs_kill_subprocess".  (This corresponds to a
	   transition from any state to the CONFIG state).

	   If no callback is registered: the event is ignored.

       GUESTFS_EVENT_LAUNCH_DONE (payload type: void)
	   The callback function will be called when the child process becomes ready first time
	   after it has been launched.	(This corresponds to a transition from LAUNCHING to the
	   READY state).

	   If no callback is registered: the event is ignored.

       GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS (payload type: array of 4 x uint64_t)
	   Some long-running operations can generate progress messages.  If this callback is
	   registered, then it will be called each time a progress message is generated (usually
	   two seconds after the operation started, and three times per second thereafter until
	   it completes, although the frequency may change in future versions).

	   The callback receives in the payload four unsigned 64 bit numbers which are (in
	   order): "proc_nr", "serial", "position", "total".

	   The units of "total" are not defined, although for some operations "total" may relate
	   in some way to the amount of data to be transferred (eg. in bytes or megabytes), and
	   "position" may be the portion which has been transferred.

	   The only defined and stable parts of the API are:

	   o   The callback can display to the user some type of progress bar or indicator which
	       shows the ratio of "position":"total".

	   o   0 <= "position" <= "total"

	   o   If any progress notification is sent during a call, then a final progress
	       notification is always sent when "position" = "total" (unless the call fails with
	       an error).

	       This is to simplify caller code, so callers can easily set the progress indicator
	       to "100%" at the end of the operation, without requiring special code to detect
	       this case.

	   o   For some calls we are unable to estimate the progress of the call, but we can
	       still generate progress messages to indicate activity.  This is known as "pulse
	       mode", and is directly supported by certain progress bar implementations (eg.
	       GtkProgressBar).

	       For these calls, zero or more progress messages are generated with "position = 0"
	       and "total = 1", followed by a final message with "position = total = 1".

	       As noted above, if the call fails with an error then the final message may not be
	       generated.

	   The callback also receives the procedure number ("proc_nr") and serial number
	   ("serial") of the call.  These are only useful for debugging protocol issues, and the
	   callback can normally ignore them.  The callback may want to print these numbers in
	   error messages or debugging messages.

	   If no callback is registered: progress messages are discarded.

       GUESTFS_EVENT_APPLIANCE (payload type: message buffer)
	   The callback function is called whenever a log message is generated by qemu, the
	   appliance kernel, guestfsd (daemon), or utility programs.

	   If the verbose flag ("guestfs_set_verbose") is set before launch ("guestfs_launch")
	   then additional debug messages are generated.

	   If no callback is registered: the messages are discarded unless the verbose flag is
	   set in which case they are sent to stderr.  You can override the printing of verbose
	   messages to stderr by setting up a callback.

       GUESTFS_EVENT_LIBRARY (payload type: message buffer)
	   The callback function is called whenever a log message is generated by the library
	   part of libguestfs.

	   If the verbose flag ("guestfs_set_verbose") is set then additional debug messages are
	   generated.

	   If no callback is registered: the messages are discarded unless the verbose flag is
	   set in which case they are sent to stderr.  You can override the printing of verbose
	   messages to stderr by setting up a callback.

       GUESTFS_EVENT_TRACE (payload type: message buffer)
	   The callback function is called whenever a trace message is generated.  This only
	   applies if the trace flag ("guestfs_set_trace") is set.

	   If no callback is registered: the messages are sent to stderr.  You can override the
	   printing of trace messages to stderr by setting up a callback.

       GUESTFS_EVENT_ENTER (payload type: function name)
	   The callback function is called whenever a libguestfs function is entered.

	   The payload is a string which contains the name of the function that we are entering
	   (not including "guestfs_" prefix).

	   Note that libguestfs functions can call themselves, so you may see many events from a
	   single call.  A few libguestfs functions do not generate this event.

	   If no callback is registered: the event is ignored.

       GUESTFS_EVENT_LIBVIRT_AUTH (payload type: libvirt URI)
	   For any API function that opens a libvirt connection, this event may be generated to
	   indicate that libvirt demands authentication information.  See "LIBVIRT
	   AUTHENTICATION" below.

	   If no callback is registered: "virConnectAuthPtrDefault" is used (suitable for
	   command-line programs only).

   EVENT API
       guestfs_set_event_callback

	int guestfs_set_event_callback (guestfs_h *g,
					guestfs_event_callback cb,
					uint64_t event_bitmask,
					int flags,
					void *opaque);

       This function registers a callback ("cb") for all event classes in the "event_bitmask".

       For example, to register for all log message events, you could call this function with the
       bitmask "GUESTFS_EVENT_APPLIANCE|GUESTFS_EVENT_LIBRARY".  To register a single callback
       for all possible classes of events, use "GUESTFS_EVENT_ALL".

       "flags" should always be passed as 0.

       "opaque" is an opaque pointer which is passed to the callback.  You can use it for any
       purpose.

       The return value is the event handle (an integer) which you can use to delete the callback
       (see below).

       If there is an error, this function returns "-1", and sets the error in the handle in the
       usual way (see "guestfs_last_error" etc.)

       Callbacks remain in effect until they are deleted, or until the handle is closed.

       In the case where multiple callbacks are registered for a particular event class, all of
       the callbacks are called.  The order in which multiple callbacks are called is not
       defined.

       guestfs_delete_event_callback

	void guestfs_delete_event_callback (guestfs_h *g, int event_handle);

       Delete a callback that was previously registered.  "event_handle" should be the integer
       that was returned by a previous call to "guestfs_set_event_callback" on the same handle.

       guestfs_event_to_string

	char *guestfs_event_to_string (uint64_t event);

       "event" is either a single event or a bitmask of events.  This returns a string
       representation (useful for debugging or printing events).

       A single event is returned as the name in lower case, eg. "close".

       A bitmask of several events is returned as a comma-separated list, eg. "close,progress".

       If zero is passed, then the empty string "" is returned.

       On success this returns a string.  On error it returns NULL and sets "errno".

       The returned string must be freed by the caller.

       guestfs_event_callback

	typedef void (*guestfs_event_callback) (
			 guestfs_h *g,
			 void *opaque,
			 uint64_t event,
			 int event_handle,
			 int flags,
			 const char *buf, size_t buf_len,
			 const uint64_t *array, size_t array_len);

       This is the type of the event callback function that you have to provide.

       The basic parameters are: the handle ("g"), the opaque user pointer ("opaque"), the event
       class (eg. "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS"), the event handle, and "flags" which in the current
       API you should ignore.

       The remaining parameters contain the event payload (if any).  Each event may contain a
       payload, which usually relates to the event class, but for future proofing your code
       should be written to handle any payload for any event class.

       "buf" and "buf_len" contain a message buffer (if "buf_len == 0", then there is no message
       buffer).  Note that this message buffer can contain arbitrary 8 bit data, including NUL
       bytes.

       "array" and "array_len" is an array of 64 bit unsigned integers.  At the moment this is
       only used for progress messages.

   EXAMPLE: CAPTURING LOG MESSAGES
       A working program demonstrating this can be found in "examples/debug-logging.c" in the
       source of libguestfs.

       One motivation for the generic event API was to allow GUI programs to capture debug and
       other messages.	In libguestfs <= 1.8 these were sent unconditionally to "stderr".

       Events associated with log messages are: "GUESTFS_EVENT_LIBRARY",
       "GUESTFS_EVENT_APPLIANCE" and "GUESTFS_EVENT_TRACE".  (Note that error messages are not
       events; you must capture error messages separately).

       Programs have to set up a callback to capture the classes of events of interest:

	int eh =
	  guestfs_set_event_callback
	    (g, message_callback,
	     GUESTFS_EVENT_LIBRARY|GUESTFS_EVENT_APPLIANCE|
	     GUESTFS_EVENT_TRACE,
	     0, NULL) == -1)
	if (eh == -1) {
	  // handle error in the usual way
	}

       The callback can then direct messages to the appropriate place.	In this example, messages
       are directed to syslog:

	static void
	message_callback (
		guestfs_h *g,
		void *opaque,
		uint64_t event,
		int event_handle,
		int flags,
		const char *buf, size_t buf_len,
		const uint64_t *array, size_t array_len)
	{
	  const int priority = LOG_USER|LOG_INFO;
	  if (buf_len > 0)
	    syslog (priority, "event 0x%lx: %s", event, buf);
	}

   LIBVIRT AUTHENTICATION
       Some libguestfs API calls can open libvirt connections.	Currently the only ones are
       "guestfs_add_domain"; and "guestfs_launch" if the libvirt backend has been selected.
       Libvirt connections may require authentication, for example if they need to access a
       remote server or to access root services from non-root.	Libvirt authentication happens
       via a callback mechanism, see
       http://libvirt.org/guide/html/Application_Development_Guide-Connections.html

       You may provide libvirt authentication data by registering a callback for events of type
       "GUESTFS_EVENT_LIBVIRT_AUTH".

       If no such event is registered, then libguestfs uses a libvirt function that provides
       command-line prompts ("virConnectAuthPtrDefault").  This is only suitable for command-line
       libguestfs programs.

       To provide authentication, first call "guestfs_set_libvirt_supported_credentials" with the
       list of credentials your program knows how to provide.  Second, register a callback for
       the "GUESTFS_EVENT_LIBVIRT_AUTH" event.	The event handler will be called when libvirt is
       requesting authentication information.

       In the event handler, call "guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credentials" to get a list of
       the credentials that libvirt is asking for.  You then need to ask (eg. the user) for each
       credential, and call "guestfs_set_libvirt_requested_credential" with the answer.  Note
       that for each credential, additional information may be available via the calls
       "guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credential_prompt",
       "guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credential_challenge" or
       "guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credential_defresult".

       The example program below should make this clearer.

       There is also a more substantial working example program supplied with the libguestfs
       sources, called "libvirt-auth.c".

	main ()
	{
	  guestfs_h *g;
	  char *creds[] = { "authname", "passphrase", NULL };
	  int r, eh;

	  g = guestfs_create ();
	  if (!g) exit (EXIT_FAILURE);

	  /* Tell libvirt what credentials the program supports. */
	  r = guestfs_set_libvirt_supported_credentials (g, creds);
	  if (r == -1)
	    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);

	  /* Set up the event handler. */
	  eh = guestfs_set_event_callback (
	      g, do_auth,
	      GUESTFS_EVENT_LIBVIRT_AUTH, 0, NULL);
	  if (eh == -1)
	    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);

	  /* An example of a call that may ask for credentials. */
	  r = guestfs_add_domain (
	      g, "dom",
	      GUESTFS_ADD_DOMAIN_LIBVIRTURI, "qemu:///system",
	      -1);
	  if (r == -1)
	    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);

	  exit (EXIT_SUCCESS);
	}

	static void
	do_auth (guestfs_h *g,
		 void *opaque,
		 uint64_t event,
		 int event_handle,
		 int flags,
		 const char *buf, size_t buf_len,
		 const uint64_t *array, size_t array_len)
	{
	  char **creds;
	  size_t i;
	  char *prompt;
	  char *reply;
	  size_t replylen;
	  int r;

	  // buf will be the libvirt URI.  buf_len may be ignored.
	  printf ("Authentication required for libvirt conn '%s'\n",
		  buf);

	  // Ask libguestfs what credentials libvirt is demanding.
	  creds = guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credentials (g);
	  if (creds == NULL)
	    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);

	  // Now ask the user for answers.
	  for (i = 0; creds[i] != NULL; ++i)
	  {
	    if (strcmp (creds[i], "authname") == 0 ||
		strcmp (creds[i], "passphrase") == 0)
	    {
	      prompt =
		guestfs_get_libvirt_requested_credential_prompt (g, i);
	      if (prompt && strcmp (prompt, "") != 0)
		printf ("%s: ", prompt);
	      free (prompt);

	      // Some code here to ask for the credential.
	      // ...
	      // Put the reply in 'reply', length 'replylen' (bytes).

	     r = guestfs_set_libvirt_requested_credential (g, i,
		 reply, replylen);
	     if (r == -1)
	       exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
	    }

	    free (creds[i]);
	  }

	  free (creds);
	}

CANCELLING LONG TRANSFERS
       Some operations can be cancelled by the caller while they are in progress.  Currently only
       operations that involve uploading or downloading data can be cancelled (technically:
       operations that have "FileIn" or "FileOut" parameters in the generator).

       To cancel the transfer, call "guestfs_user_cancel".  For more information, read the
       description of "guestfs_user_cancel".

PRIVATE DATA AREA
       You can attach named pieces of private data to the libguestfs handle, fetch them by name,
       and walk over them, for the lifetime of the handle.  This is called the private data area
       and is only available from the C API.

       To attach a named piece of data, use the following call:

	void guestfs_set_private (guestfs_h *g, const char *key, void *data);

       "key" is the name to associate with this data, and "data" is an arbitrary pointer (which
       can be "NULL").	Any previous item with the same key is overwritten.

       You can use any "key" string you want, but avoid keys beginning with an underscore
       character (libguestfs uses those for its own internal purposes, such as implementing
       language bindings).  It is recommended that you prefix the key with some unique string to
       avoid collisions with other users.

       To retrieve the pointer, use:

	void *guestfs_get_private (guestfs_h *g, const char *key);

       This function returns "NULL" if either no data is found associated with "key", or if the
       user previously set the "key"'s "data" pointer to "NULL".

       Libguestfs does not try to look at or interpret the "data" pointer in any way.  As far as
       libguestfs is concerned, it need not be a valid pointer at all.	In particular, libguestfs
       does not try to free the data when the handle is closed.  If the data must be freed, then
       the caller must either free it before calling "guestfs_close" or must set up a close
       callback to do it (see "GUESTFS_EVENT_CLOSE").

       To walk over all entries, use these two functions:

	void *guestfs_first_private (guestfs_h *g, const char **key_rtn);

	void *guestfs_next_private (guestfs_h *g, const char **key_rtn);

       "guestfs_first_private" returns the first key, pointer pair ("first" does not have any
       particular meaning -- keys are not returned in any defined order).  A pointer to the key
       is returned in *key_rtn and the corresponding data pointer is returned from the function.
       "NULL" is returned if there are no keys stored in the handle.

       "guestfs_next_private" returns the next key, pointer pair.  The return value of this
       function is "NULL" if there are no further entries to return.

       Notes about walking over entries:

       o   You must not call "guestfs_set_private" while walking over the entries.

       o   The handle maintains an internal iterator which is reset when you call
	   "guestfs_first_private".  This internal iterator is invalidated when you call
	   "guestfs_set_private".

       o   If you have set the data pointer associated with a key to "NULL", ie:

	    guestfs_set_private (g, key, NULL);

	   then that "key" is not returned when walking.

       o   *key_rtn is only valid until the next call to "guestfs_first_private",
	   "guestfs_next_private" or "guestfs_set_private".

       The following example code shows how to print all keys and data pointers that are
       associated with the handle "g":

	const char *key;
	void *data = guestfs_first_private (g, &key);
	while (data != NULL)
	  {
	    printf ("key = %s, data = %p\n", key, data);
	    data = guestfs_next_private (g, &key);
	  }

       More commonly you are only interested in keys that begin with an application-specific
       prefix "foo_".  Modify the loop like so:

	const char *key;
	void *data = guestfs_first_private (g, &key);
	while (data != NULL)
	  {
	    if (strncmp (key, "foo_", strlen ("foo_")) == 0)
	      printf ("key = %s, data = %p\n", key, data);
	    data = guestfs_next_private (g, &key);
	  }

       If you need to modify keys while walking, then you have to jump back to the beginning of
       the loop.  For example, to delete all keys prefixed with "foo_":

	 const char *key;
	 void *data;
	again:
	 data = guestfs_first_private (g, &key);
	 while (data != NULL)
	   {
	     if (strncmp (key, "foo_", strlen ("foo_")) == 0)
	       {
		 guestfs_set_private (g, key, NULL);
		 /* note that 'key' pointer is now invalid, and so is
		    the internal iterator */
		 goto again;
	       }
	     data = guestfs_next_private (g, &key);
	   }

       Note that the above loop is guaranteed to terminate because the keys are being deleted,
       but other manipulations of keys within the loop might not terminate unless you also
       maintain an indication of which keys have been visited.

SYSTEMTAP
       The libguestfs C library can be probed using systemtap or DTrace.  This is true of any
       library, not just libguestfs.  However libguestfs also contains static markers to help in
       probing internal operations.

       You can list all the static markers by doing:

	stap -l 'process("/usr/lib*/libguestfs.so.0")
		     .provider("guestfs").mark("*")'

       Note: These static markers are not part of the stable API and may change in future
       versions.

   SYSTEMTAP SCRIPT EXAMPLE
       This script contains examples of displaying both the static markers and some ordinary C
       entry points:

	global last;

	function display_time () {
	      now = gettimeofday_us ();
	      delta = 0;
	      if (last > 0)
		    delta = now - last;
	      last = now;

	      printf ("%d (+%d):", now, delta);
	}

	probe begin {
	      last = 0;
	      printf ("ready\n");
	}

	/* Display all calls to static markers. */
	probe process("/usr/lib*/libguestfs.so.0")
		  .provider("guestfs").mark("*") ? {
	      display_time();
	      printf ("\t%s %s\n", $$name, $$parms);
	}

	/* Display all calls to guestfs_mkfs* functions. */
	probe process("/usr/lib*/libguestfs.so.0")
		  .function("guestfs_mkfs*") ? {
	      display_time();
	      printf ("\t%s %s\n", probefunc(), $$parms);
	}

       The script above can be saved to "test.stap" and run using the stap(1) program.	Note that
       you either have to be root, or you have to add yourself to several special stap groups.
       Consult the systemtap documentation for more information.

	# stap /tmp/test.stap
	ready

       In another terminal, run a guestfish command such as this:

	guestfish -N fs

       In the first terminal, stap trace output similar to this is shown:

	1318248056692655 (+0): launch_start
	1318248056692850 (+195):       launch_build_appliance_start
	1318248056818285 (+125435):    launch_build_appliance_end
	1318248056838059 (+19774):     launch_run_qemu
	1318248061071167 (+4233108):   launch_end
	1318248061280324 (+209157):    guestfs_mkfs g=0x1024ab0 fstype=0x46116f device=0x1024e60

ARCHITECTURE
       Internally, libguestfs is implemented by running an appliance (a special type of small
       virtual machine) using qemu(1).	Qemu runs as a child process of the main program.

	 ___________________
	/		    \
	| main program	    |
	|		    |
	|		    |		child process / appliance
	|		    |		__________________________
	|		    |	       / qemu			  \
	+-------------------+	RPC    |      +-----------------+ |
	| libguestfs	 <--------------------> guestfsd	| |
	|		    |	       |      +-----------------+ |
	\___________________/	       |      | Linux kernel	| |
				       |      +--^--------------+ |
				       \_________|________________/
						 |
					  _______v______
					 /		\
					 | Device or	|
					 | disk image	|
					 \______________/

       The library, linked to the main program, creates the child process and hence the appliance
       in the "guestfs_launch" function.

       Inside the appliance is a Linux kernel and a complete stack of userspace tools (such as
       LVM and ext2 programs) and a small controlling daemon called "guestfsd".  The library
       talks to "guestfsd" using remote procedure calls (RPC).	There is a mostly one-to-one
       correspondence between libguestfs API calls and RPC calls to the daemon.  Lastly the disk
       image(s) are attached to the qemu process which translates device access by the
       appliance's Linux kernel into accesses to the image.

       A common misunderstanding is that the appliance "is" the virtual machine.  Although the
       disk image you are attached to might also be used by some virtual machine, libguestfs
       doesn't know or care about this.  (But you will care if both libguestfs's qemu process and
       your virtual machine are trying to update the disk image at the same time, since these
       usually results in massive disk corruption).

STATE MACHINE
       libguestfs uses a state machine to model the child process:

				|
		 guestfs_create / guestfs_create_flags
				|
				|
			    ____V_____
			   /	      \
			   |  CONFIG  |
			   \__________/
			      ^   ^  \
			      |    \  \ guestfs_launch
			      |    _\__V______
			      |   /	      \
			      |   | LAUNCHING |
			      |   \___________/
			      |       /
			      |  guestfs_launch
			      |     /
			    __|____V
			   /	    \
			   | READY  |
			   \________/

       The normal transitions are (1) CONFIG (when the handle is created, but there is no child
       process), (2) LAUNCHING (when the child process is booting up), (3) READY meaning the
       appliance is up, actions can be issued to, and carried out by, the child process.

       The guest may be killed by "guestfs_kill_subprocess", or may die asynchronously at any
       time (eg. due to some internal error), and that causes the state to transition back to
       CONFIG.

       Configuration commands for qemu such as "guestfs_set_path" can only be issued when in the
       CONFIG state.

       The API offers one call that goes from CONFIG through LAUNCHING to READY.
       "guestfs_launch" blocks until the child process is READY to accept commands (or until some
       failure or timeout).  "guestfs_launch" internally moves the state from CONFIG to LAUNCHING
       while it is running.

       API actions such as "guestfs_mount" can only be issued when in the READY state.	These API
       calls block waiting for the command to be carried out.  There are no non-blocking
       versions, and no way to issue more than one command per handle at the same time.

       Finally, the child process sends asynchronous messages back to the main program, such as
       kernel log messages.  You can register a callback to receive these messages.

INTERNALS
   APPLIANCE BOOT PROCESS
       This process has evolved and continues to evolve.  The description here corresponds only
       to the current version of libguestfs and is provided for information only.

       In order to follow the stages involved below, enable libguestfs debugging (set the
       environment variable "LIBGUESTFS_DEBUG=1").

       Create the appliance
	   "supermin-helper" is invoked to create the kernel, a small initrd and the appliance.

	   The appliance is cached in "/var/tmp/.guestfs-<UID>" (or in another directory if
	   "LIBGUESTFS_CACHEDIR" or "TMPDIR" are set).

	   For a complete description of how the appliance is created and cached, read the
	   supermin(8) and supermin-helper(8) man pages.

       Start qemu and boot the kernel
	   qemu is invoked to boot the kernel.

       Run the initrd
	   "supermin-helper" builds a small initrd.  The initrd is not the appliance.  The
	   purpose of the initrd is to load enough kernel modules in order that the appliance
	   itself can be mounted and started.

	   The initrd is a cpio archive called "/var/tmp/.guestfs-<UID>/initrd".

	   When the initrd has started you will see messages showing that kernel modules are
	   being loaded, similar to this:

	    supermin: ext2 mini initrd starting up
	    supermin: mounting /sys
	    supermin: internal insmod libcrc32c.ko
	    supermin: internal insmod crc32c-intel.ko

       Find and mount the appliance device
	   The appliance is a sparse file containing an ext2 filesystem which contains a familiar
	   (although reduced in size) Linux operating system.  It would normally be called
	   "/var/tmp/.guestfs-<UID>/root".

	   The regular disks being inspected by libguestfs are the first devices exposed by qemu
	   (eg. as "/dev/vda").

	   The last disk added to qemu is the appliance itself (eg. "/dev/vdb" if there was only
	   one regular disk).

	   Thus the final job of the initrd is to locate the appliance disk, mount it, and switch
	   root into the appliance, and run "/init" from the appliance.

	   If this works successfully you will see messages such as:

	    supermin: picked /sys/block/vdb/dev as root device
	    supermin: creating /dev/root as block special 252:16
	    supermin: mounting new root on /root
	    supermin: chroot
	    Starting /init script ...

	   Note that "Starting /init script ..." indicates that the appliance's init script is
	   now running.

       Initialize the appliance
	   The appliance itself now initializes itself.  This involves starting certain processes
	   like "udev", possibly printing some debug information, and finally running the daemon
	   ("guestfsd").

       The daemon
	   Finally the daemon ("guestfsd") runs inside the appliance.  If it runs you should see:

	    verbose daemon enabled

	   The daemon expects to see a named virtio-serial port exposed by qemu and connected on
	   the other end to the library.

	   The daemon connects to this port (and hence to the library) and sends a four byte
	   message "GUESTFS_LAUNCH_FLAG", which initiates the communication protocol (see below).

   COMMUNICATION PROTOCOL
       Don't rely on using this protocol directly.  This section documents how it currently
       works, but it may change at any time.

       The protocol used to talk between the library and the daemon running inside the qemu
       virtual machine is a simple RPC mechanism built on top of XDR (RFC 1014, RFC 1832, RFC
       4506).

       The detailed format of structures is in "src/guestfs_protocol.x" (note: this file is
       automatically generated).

       There are two broad cases, ordinary functions that don't have any "FileIn" and "FileOut"
       parameters, which are handled with very simple request/reply messages.  Then there are
       functions that have any "FileIn" or "FileOut" parameters, which use the same request and
       reply messages, but they may also be followed by files sent using a chunked encoding.

       ORDINARY FUNCTIONS (NO FILEIN/FILEOUT PARAMS)

       For ordinary functions, the request message is:

	total length (header + arguments,
	     but not including the length word itself)
	struct guestfs_message_header (encoded as XDR)
	struct guestfs_<foo>_args (encoded as XDR)

       The total length field allows the daemon to allocate a fixed size buffer into which it
       slurps the rest of the message.	As a result, the total length is limited to
       "GUESTFS_MESSAGE_MAX" bytes (currently 4MB), which means the effective size of any request
       is limited to somewhere under this size.

       Note also that many functions don't take any arguments, in which case the
       "guestfs_foo_args" is completely omitted.

       The header contains the procedure number ("guestfs_proc") which is how the receiver knows
       what type of args structure to expect, or none at all.

       For functions that take optional arguments, the optional arguments are encoded in the
       "guestfs_foo_args" structure in the same way as ordinary arguments.  A bitmask in the
       header indicates which optional arguments are meaningful.  The bitmask is also checked to
       see if it contains bits set which the daemon does not know about (eg. if more optional
       arguments were added in a later version of the library), and this causes the call to be
       rejected.

       The reply message for ordinary functions is:

	total length (header + ret,
	     but not including the length word itself)
	struct guestfs_message_header (encoded as XDR)
	struct guestfs_<foo>_ret (encoded as XDR)

       As above the "guestfs_foo_ret" structure may be completely omitted for functions that
       return no formal return values.

       As above the total length of the reply is limited to "GUESTFS_MESSAGE_MAX".

       In the case of an error, a flag is set in the header, and the reply message is slightly
       changed:

	total length (header + error,
	     but not including the length word itself)
	struct guestfs_message_header (encoded as XDR)
	struct guestfs_message_error (encoded as XDR)

       The "guestfs_message_error" structure contains the error message as a string.

       FUNCTIONS THAT HAVE FILEIN PARAMETERS

       A "FileIn" parameter indicates that we transfer a file into the guest.  The normal request
       message is sent (see above).  However this is followed by a sequence of file chunks.

	total length (header + arguments,
	     but not including the length word itself,
	     and not including the chunks)
	struct guestfs_message_header (encoded as XDR)
	struct guestfs_<foo>_args (encoded as XDR)
	sequence of chunks for FileIn param #0
	sequence of chunks for FileIn param #1 etc.

       The "sequence of chunks" is:

	length of chunk (not including length word itself)
	struct guestfs_chunk (encoded as XDR)
	length of chunk
	struct guestfs_chunk (encoded as XDR)
	  ...
	length of chunk
	struct guestfs_chunk (with data.data_len == 0)

       The final chunk has the "data_len" field set to zero.  Additionally a flag is set in the
       final chunk to indicate either successful completion or early cancellation.

       At time of writing there are no functions that have more than one FileIn parameter.
       However this is (theoretically) supported, by sending the sequence of chunks for each
       FileIn parameter one after another (from left to right).

       Both the library (sender) and the daemon (receiver) may cancel the transfer.  The library
       does this by sending a chunk with a special flag set to indicate cancellation.  When the
       daemon sees this, it cancels the whole RPC, does not send any reply, and goes back to
       reading the next request.

       The daemon may also cancel.  It does this by writing a special word "GUESTFS_CANCEL_FLAG"
       to the socket.  The library listens for this during the transfer, and if it gets it, it
       will cancel the transfer (it sends a cancel chunk).  The special word is chosen so that
       even if cancellation happens right at the end of the transfer (after the library has
       finished writing and has started listening for the reply), the "spurious" cancel flag will
       not be confused with the reply message.

       This protocol allows the transfer of arbitrary sized files (no 32 bit limit), and also
       files where the size is not known in advance (eg. from pipes or sockets).  However the
       chunks are rather small ("GUESTFS_MAX_CHUNK_SIZE"), so that neither the library nor the
       daemon need to keep much in memory.

       FUNCTIONS THAT HAVE FILEOUT PARAMETERS

       The protocol for FileOut parameters is exactly the same as for FileIn parameters, but with
       the roles of daemon and library reversed.

	total length (header + ret,
	     but not including the length word itself,
	     and not including the chunks)
	struct guestfs_message_header (encoded as XDR)
	struct guestfs_<foo>_ret (encoded as XDR)
	sequence of chunks for FileOut param #0
	sequence of chunks for FileOut param #1 etc.

       INITIAL MESSAGE

       When the daemon launches it sends an initial word ("GUESTFS_LAUNCH_FLAG") which indicates
       that the guest and daemon is alive.  This is what "guestfs_launch" waits for.

       PROGRESS NOTIFICATION MESSAGES

       The daemon may send progress notification messages at any time.	These are distinguished
       by the normal length word being replaced by "GUESTFS_PROGRESS_FLAG", followed by a fixed
       size progress message.

       The library turns them into progress callbacks (see "GUESTFS_EVENT_PROGRESS") if there is
       a callback registered, or discards them if not.

       The daemon self-limits the frequency of progress messages it sends (see
       "daemon/proto.c:notify_progress").  Not all calls generate progress messages.

LIBGUESTFS VERSION NUMBERS
       Since April 2010, libguestfs has started to make separate development and stable releases,
       along with corresponding branches in our git repository.  These separate releases can be
       identified by version number:

			even numbers for stable: 1.2.x, 1.4.x, ...
	      .-------- odd numbers for development: 1.3.x, 1.5.x, ...
	      |
	      v
	1  .  3  .  5
	^	    ^
	|	    |
	|	    `-------- sub-version
	|
	`------ always '1' because we don't change the ABI

       Thus "1.3.5" is the 5th update to the development branch "1.3".

       As time passes we cherry pick fixes from the development branch and backport those into
       the stable branch, the effect being that the stable branch should get more stable and less
       buggy over time.  So the stable releases are ideal for people who don't need new features
       but would just like the software to work.

       Our criteria for backporting changes are:

       o   Documentation changes which don't affect any code are backported unless the
	   documentation refers to a future feature which is not in stable.

       o   Bug fixes which are not controversial, fix obvious problems, and have been well tested
	   are backported.

       o   Simple rearrangements of code which shouldn't affect how it works get backported.
	   This is so that the code in the two branches doesn't get too far out of step, allowing
	   us to backport future fixes more easily.

       o   We don't backport new features, new APIs, new tools etc, except in one exceptional
	   case: the new feature is required in order to implement an important bug fix.

       A new stable branch starts when we think the new features in development are substantial
       and compelling enough over the current stable branch to warrant it.  When that happens we
       create new stable and development versions 1.N.0 and 1.(N+1).0 [N is even].  The new dot-
       oh release won't necessarily be so stable at this point, but by backporting fixes from
       development, that branch will stabilize over time.

EXTENDING LIBGUESTFS
       This section is for hackers who want to extend libguestfs itself.

   OVERVIEW OF THE SOURCE CODE
       Libguestfs source is located in the github repository
       https://github.com/libguestfs/libguestfs

       Large amounts of boilerplate code in libguestfs (RPC, bindings, documentation) are
       generated.  This means that many source files will appear to be missing from a
       straightforward git checkout.  You have to run the generator ("./autogen.sh && make -C
       generator") in order to create those files.

       Libguestfs uses an autotools-based build system, with the main files being "configure.ac"
       and "Makefile.am".  The "generator" subdirectory contains the generator, plus files
       describing the API.  The "src" subdirectory contains source for the library.  The
       "appliance" and "daemon" subdirectories contain the source for the code that builds the
       appliance, and the code that runs in the appliance respectively.  Other directories are
       covered in the section "SOURCE CODE SUBDIRECTORIES" below.

       Apart from the fact that all API entry points go via some generated code, the library is
       straightforward.  (In fact, even the generated code is designed to be readable, and should
       be read as ordinary code).  Some actions run entirely in the library, and are written as C
       functions in files under "src".	Others are forwarded to the daemon where (after some
       generated RPC marshalling) they appear as C functions in files under "daemon".

       To build from source, first read the "README" file.

   "local*" FILES
       Files in the top source directory that begin with the prefix "local*" are ignored by git.
       These files can contain local configuration or scripts that you need to build libguestfs.

       By convention, I have a file called "localconfigure" which is a simple wrapper around
       "autogen.sh" containing local configure customizations that I need:

	. localenv
	./autogen.sh \
	    --with-default-backend=libvirt \
	    --enable-gcc-warnings \
	    --enable-gtk-doc \
	    -C \
	    "$@"

       So I can use this to build libguestfs:

	./localconfigure && make

       If there is a file in the top build directory called "localenv", then it will be sourced
       by "make".  This file can contain any local environment variables needed, eg. for skipping
       tests:

	# Use an alternate python binary.
	export PYTHON=python3
	# Skip this test, it is broken.
	export SKIP_TEST_BTRFS_FSCK=1

       Note that "localenv" is included by the top Makefile (so it's a Makefile fragment).  But
       if it is also sourced by your "localconfigure" script then it is used as a shell script.

   ADDING A NEW API ACTION
       Because large amounts of boilerplate code in libguestfs are generated, this makes it easy
       to extend the libguestfs API.

       To add a new API action there are two changes:

       1.  You need to add a description of the call (name, parameters, return type, tests,
	   documentation) to "generator/actions.ml".

	   There are two sorts of API action, depending on whether the call goes through to the
	   daemon in the appliance, or is serviced entirely by the library (see "ARCHITECTURE"
	   above).  "guestfs_sync" is an example of the former, since the sync is done in the
	   appliance.  "guestfs_set_trace" is an example of the latter, since a trace flag is
	   maintained in the handle and all tracing is done on the library side.

	   Most new actions are of the first type, and get added to the "daemon_functions" list.
	   Each function has a unique procedure number used in the RPC protocol which is assigned
	   to that action when we publish libguestfs and cannot be reused.  Take the latest
	   procedure number and increment it.

	   For library-only actions of the second type, add to the "non_daemon_functions" list.
	   Since these functions are serviced by the library and do not travel over the RPC
	   mechanism to the daemon, these functions do not need a procedure number, and so the
	   procedure number is set to "-1".

       2.  Implement the action (in C):

	   For daemon actions, implement the function "do_<name>" in the "daemon/" directory.

	   For library actions, implement the function "guestfs__<name>" (note: double
	   underscore) in the "src/" directory.

	   In either case, use another function as an example of what to do.

       After making these changes, use "make" to compile.

       Note that you don't need to implement the RPC, language bindings, manual pages or anything
       else.  It's all automatically generated from the OCaml description.

   ADDING TESTS FOR AN API ACTION
       You can supply zero or as many tests as you want per API call.  The tests can either be
       added as part of the API description ("generator/actions.ml"), or in some rarer cases you
       may want to drop a script into "tests/*/".  Note that adding a script to "tests/*/" is
       slower, so if possible use the first method.

       The following describes the test environment used when you add an API test in
       "actions.ml".

       The test environment has 4 block devices:

       "/dev/sda" 500MB
	   General block device for testing.

       "/dev/sdb" 50MB
	   "/dev/sdb1" is an ext2 filesystem used for testing filesystem write operations.

       "/dev/sdc" 10MB
	   Used in a few tests where two block devices are needed.

       "/dev/sdd"
	   ISO with fixed content (see "images/test.iso").

       To be able to run the tests in a reasonable amount of time, the libguestfs appliance and
       block devices are reused between tests.	So don't try testing "guestfs_kill_subprocess"
       :-x

       Each test starts with an initial scenario, selected using one of the "Init*" expressions,
       described in "generator/types.ml".  These initialize the disks mentioned above in a
       particular way as documented in "types.ml".  You should not assume anything about the
       previous contents of other disks that are not initialized.

       You can add a prerequisite clause to any individual test.  This is a run-time check,
       which, if it fails, causes the test to be skipped.  Useful if testing a command which
       might not work on all variations of libguestfs builds.  A test that has prerequisite of
       "Always" means to run unconditionally.

       In addition, packagers can skip individual tests by setting environment variables before
       running "make check".

	SKIP_TEST_<CMD>_<NUM>=1

       eg: "SKIP_TEST_COMMAND_3=1" skips test #3 of "guestfs_command".

       or:

	SKIP_TEST_<CMD>=1

       eg: "SKIP_TEST_ZEROFREE=1" skips all "guestfs_zerofree" tests.

       Packagers can run only certain tests by setting for example:

	TEST_ONLY="vfs_type zerofree"

       See "tests/c-api/tests.c" for more details of how these environment variables work.

   DEBUGGING NEW API ACTIONS
       Test new actions work before submitting them.

       You can use guestfish to try out new commands.

       Debugging the daemon is a problem because it runs inside a minimal environment.	However
       you can fprintf messages in the daemon to stderr, and they will show up if you use
       "guestfish -v".

   ADDING A NEW LANGUAGE BINDING
       All language bindings must be generated by the generator (see the "generator"
       subdirectory).

       There is no documentation for this yet.	We suggest you look at an existing binding, eg.
       "generator/ocaml.ml" or "generator/perl.ml".

   ADDING TESTS FOR LANGUAGE BINDINGS
       Language bindings should come with tests.  Previously testing of language bindings was
       rather ad-hoc, but we have been trying to formalize the set of tests that every language
       binding should use.

       Currently only the OCaml and Perl bindings actually implement the full set of tests, and
       the OCaml bindings are canonical, so you should emulate what the OCaml tests do.

       This is the numbering scheme used by the tests:

	- 000+ basic tests:

	  010  load the library
	  020  create
	  030  create-flags
	  040  create multiple handles
	  050  test setting and getting config properties
	  060  explicit close
	  070  optargs

	- 100  launch, create partitions and LVs and filesystems

	- 400+ events:

	  410  close event
	  420  log messages
	  430  progress messages

	- 800+ regression tests (specific to the language)

	- 900+ any other custom tests for the language

       To save time when running the tests, only 100, 430, 800+, 900+ should launch the handle.

   FORMATTING CODE
       Our C source code generally adheres to some basic code-formatting conventions.  The
       existing code base is not totally consistent on this front, but we do prefer that
       contributed code be formatted similarly.  In short, use spaces-not-TABs for indentation,
       use 2 spaces for each indentation level, and other than that, follow the K&R style.

       If you use Emacs, add the following to one of one of your start-up files (e.g., ~/.emacs),
       to help ensure that you get indentation right:

	;;; In libguestfs, indent with spaces everywhere (not TABs).
	;;; Exceptions: Makefile and ChangeLog modes.
	(add-hook 'find-file-hook
	    '(lambda () (if (and buffer-file-name
				 (string-match "/libguestfs\\>"
				     (buffer-file-name))
				 (not (string-equal mode-name "Change Log"))
				 (not (string-equal mode-name "Makefile")))
			    (setq indent-tabs-mode nil))))

	;;; When editing C sources in libguestfs, use this style.
	(defun libguestfs-c-mode ()
	  "C mode with adjusted defaults for use with libguestfs."
	  (interactive)
	  (c-set-style "K&R")
	  (setq c-indent-level 2)
	  (setq c-basic-offset 2))
	(add-hook 'c-mode-hook
		  '(lambda () (if (string-match "/libguestfs\\>"
				      (buffer-file-name))
				  (libguestfs-c-mode))))

   TESTING YOUR CHANGES
       Enable warnings when compiling (and fix any problems this finds):

	./configure --enable-gcc-warnings

       Useful targets are:

       "make check"
	   Runs the regular test suite.

	   This is implemented using the regular automake "TESTS" target.  See the automake
	   documentation for details.

       "make syntax-check -j1 -k"
	   Checks for various syntax and style problems in the code.

       "make check-valgrind"
	   Runs a subset of the test suite under valgrind.

	   Any "Makefile.am" in the tree that has a "check-valgrind:" target will be run by this
	   rule.

       "make check-valgrind-local-guests"
	   Runs a subset of the test suite under valgrind using locally installed libvirt guests
	   (read-only).

       "make check-direct"
	   Runs all tests using default appliance back-end.  This only has any effect if a non-
	   default backend was selected using "./configure --with-default-backend=..."

       "make check-valgrind-direct"
	   Run a subset of the test suite under valgrind using the default appliance back-end.

       "make check-with-upstream-qemu"
	   Runs all tests using a local qemu binary.  It looks for the qemu binary in QEMUDIR
	   (defaults to "$HOME/d/qemu"), but you can set this to another directory on the command
	   line, eg:

	    make check-with-upstream-qemu QEMUDIR=/usr/src/qemu

       "make check-with-upstream-libvirt"
	   Runs all tests using a local libvirt.  This only has any effect if the libvirt backend
	   was selected using "./configure --with-default-backend=libvirt"

	   It looks for libvirt in LIBVIRTDIR (defaults to "$HOME/d/libvirt"), but you can set
	   this to another directory on the command line, eg:

	    make check-with-upstream-libvirt LIBVIRTDIR=/usr/src/libvirt

       "make check-slow"
	   Runs some slow/long-running tests which are not run by default.

	   Any "Makefile.am" in the tree that has a "check-slow:" target will be run by this
	   rule.

       "make extra-tests"
	   Equivalent to running all "make check-*" rules (but not "make check").

       "make check-all"
	   Equivalent to running all "make check*" rules.

       "make check-release"
	   Runs a subset of "make check*" rules that are required to pass before a tarball can be
	   released.  Currently this is:

	   o   check

	   o   check-valgrind

	   o   check-direct

	   o   check-valgrind-direct

	   o   check-slow

   DAEMON CUSTOM PRINTF FORMATTERS
       In the daemon code we have created custom printf formatters %Q and %R, which are used to
       do shell quoting.

       %Q  Simple shell quoted string.	Any spaces or other shell characters are escaped for you.

       %R  Same as %Q except the string is treated as a path which is prefixed by the sysroot.

       For example:

	asprintf (&cmd, "cat %R", path);

       would produce "cat /sysroot/some\ path\ with\ spaces"

       Note: Do not use these when you are passing parameters to the "command{,r,v,rv}()"
       functions.  These parameters do NOT need to be quoted because they are not passed via the
       shell (instead, straight to exec).  You probably want to use the "sysroot_path()" function
       however.

   SUBMITTING YOUR NEW API ACTIONS
       Submit patches to the mailing list: http://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/libguestfs and
       CC to rjones@redhat.com.

   INTERNATIONALIZATION (I18N) SUPPORT
       We support i18n (gettext anyhow) in the library.

       However many messages come from the daemon, and we don't translate those at the moment.
       One reason is that the appliance generally has all locale files removed from it, because
       they take up a lot of space.  So we'd have to readd some of those, as well as copying our
       PO files into the appliance.

       Debugging messages are never translated, since they are intended for the programmers.

   SOURCE CODE SUBDIRECTORIES
       "align"
	   virt-alignment-scan(1) command and documentation.

       "appliance"
	   The libguestfs appliance, build scripts and so on.

       "bash"
	   Bash tab-completion scripts.

       "build-aux"
	   Various build scripts used by autotools.

       "cat"
	   The virt-cat(1), virt-filesystems(1) and virt-ls(1) commands and documentation.

       "contrib"
	   Outside contributions, experimental parts.

       "daemon"
	   The daemon that runs inside the libguestfs appliance and carries out actions.

       "df"
	   virt-df(1) command and documentation.

       "edit"
	   virt-edit(1) command and documentation.

       "examples"
	   C API example code.

       "fish"
	   guestfish(1), the command-line shell, and various shell scripts built on top such as
	   virt-copy-in(1), virt-copy-out(1), virt-tar-in(1), virt-tar-out(1).

       "format"
	   virt-format(1) command and documentation.

       "fuse"
	   guestmount(1), FUSE (userspace filesystem) built on top of libguestfs.

       "generator"
	   The crucially important generator, used to automatically generate large amounts of
	   boilerplate C code for things like RPC and bindings.

       "gnulib"
	   Gnulib is used as a portability library.  A copy of gnulib is included under here.

       "html"
	   Generated HTML manual pages.

       "inspector"
	   virt-inspector(1), the virtual machine image inspector.

       "logo"
	   Logo used on the website.  The fish is called Arthur by the way.

       "m4"
	   M4 macros used by autoconf.

       "po"
	   Translations of simple gettext strings.

       "po-docs"
	   The build infrastructure and PO files for translations of manpages and POD files.
	   Eventually this will be combined with the "po" directory, but that is rather
	   complicated.

       "rescue"
	   virt-rescue(1) command and documentation.

       "resize"
	   virt-resize(1) command and documentation.

       "sparsify"
	   virt-sparsify(1) command and documentation.

       "src"
	   Source code to the C library.

       "sysprep"
	   virt-sysprep(1) command and documentation.

       "tests"
	   Tests.

       "test-tool"
	   Test tool for end users to test if their qemu/kernel combination will work with
	   libguestfs.

       "tmp"
	   Used for temporary files when running the tests (instead of "/tmp" etc).  The reason
	   is so that you can run multiple parallel tests of libguestfs without having one set of
	   tests overwriting the appliance created by another.

       "tools"
	   Command line tools written in Perl (virt-win-reg(1) and many others).

       "csharp"
       "erlang"
       "gobject"
       "haskell"
       "java"
       "lua"
       "ocaml"
       "php"
       "perl"
       "python"
       "ruby"
	   Language bindings.

   MAKING A STABLE RELEASE
       When we make a stable release, there are several steps documented here.	See "LIBGUESTFS
       VERSION NUMBERS" for general information about the stable branch policy.

       o   Check "make && make check" works on at least Fedora, Debian and Ubuntu.

       o   Finalize "guestfs-release-notes.pod"

       o   Update ROADMAP.

       o   Run "src/api-support/update-from-tarballs.sh".

       o   Push and pull from Transifex.

	   Run:

	    tx push -s

	   to push the latest POT files to Transifex.  Then run:

	    ./tx-pull.sh

	   which is a wrapper to pull the latest translated "*.po" files.

       o   Consider updating gnulib to latest upstream version.

       o   Create new stable and development directories under http://libguestfs.org/download.

       o   Edit "index.html.in" on website.

       o   Create the branch in git:

	    git tag -a 1.XX.0 -m "Version 1.XX.0 (stable)"
	    git tag -a 1.YY.0 -m "Version 1.YY.0 (development)"
	    git branch stable-1.XX
	    git push origin tag 1.XX.0 1.YY.0 stable-1.XX

LIMITS
   PROTOCOL LIMITS
       Internally libguestfs uses a message-based protocol to pass API calls and their responses
       to and from a small "appliance" (see "INTERNALS" for plenty more detail about this).  The
       maximum message size used by the protocol is slightly less than 4 MB.  For some API calls
       you may need to be aware of this limit.	The API calls which may be affected are
       individually documented, with a link back to this section of the documentation.

       In libguestfs < 1.19.32, several calls had to encode either their entire argument list or
       their entire return value (or sometimes both) in a single protocol message, and this gave
       them an arbitrary limitation on how much data they could handle.  For example,
       "guestfs_cat" could only download a file if it was less than around 4 MB in size.  In
       later versions of libguestfs, some of these limits have been removed.  The APIs which were
       previously limited but are now unlimited (except perhaps by available memory) are listed
       below.  To find out if a specific API is subject to protocol limits, check for the warning
       in the API documentation which links to this section, and remember to check the version of
       the documentation that matches the version of libguestfs you are using.

       "guestfs_cat", "guestfs_find", "guestfs_read_file", "guestfs_read_lines", "guestfs_write",
       "guestfs_write_append", "guestfs_lstatlist", "guestfs_lxattrlist", "guestfs_readlinklist",
       "guestfs_ls".

       See also "UPLOADING" and "DOWNLOADING" for further information about copying large amounts
       of data into or out of a filesystem.

   MAXIMUM NUMBER OF DISKS
       In libguestfs >= 1.19.7, you can query the maximum number of disks that may be added by
       calling "guestfs_max_disks".  In earlier versions of libguestfs (ie. where this call is
       not available) you should assume the maximum is 25.

       The rest of this section covers implementation details, which could change in future.

       When using virtio-scsi disks (the default if available in qemu) the current limit is 255
       disks.  When using virtio-blk (the old default) the limit is around 27 disks, but may vary
       according to implementation details and whether the network is enabled.

       Virtio-scsi as used by libguestfs is configured to use one target per disk, and 256
       targets are available.

       Virtio-blk consumes 1 virtual PCI slot per disk, and PCI is limited to 31 slots, but some
       of these are used for other purposes.

       One virtual disk is used by libguestfs internally.

       Before libguestfs 1.19.7, disk names had to be a single character (eg. "/dev/sda" through
       "/dev/sdz"), and since one disk is reserved, that meant the limit was 25.  This has been
       fixed in more recent versions.

       In libguestfs >= 1.20 it is possible to hot plug disks.	See "HOTPLUGGING".

   MAXIMUM NUMBER OF PARTITIONS PER DISK
       Virtio limits the maximum number of partitions per disk to 15.

       This is because it reserves 4 bits for the minor device number (thus "/dev/vda", and
       "/dev/vda1" through "/dev/vda15").

       If you attach a disk with more than 15 partitions, the extra partitions are ignored by
       libguestfs.

   MAXIMUM SIZE OF A DISK
       Probably the limit is between 2**63-1 and 2**64-1 bytes.

       We have tested block devices up to 1 exabyte (2**60 or 1,152,921,504,606,846,976 bytes)
       using sparse files backed by an XFS host filesystem.

       Although libguestfs probably does not impose any limit, the underlying host storage will.
       If you store disk images on a host ext4 filesystem, then the maximum size will be limited
       by the maximum ext4 file size (currently 16 TB).  If you store disk images as host logical
       volumes then you are limited by the maximum size of an LV.

       For the hugest disk image files, we recommend using XFS on the host for storage.

   MAXIMUM SIZE OF A PARTITION
       The MBR (ie. classic MS-DOS) partitioning scheme uses 32 bit sector numbers.  Assuming a
       512 byte sector size, this means that MBR cannot address a partition located beyond 2 TB
       on the disk.

       It is recommended that you use GPT partitions on disks which are larger than this size.
       GPT uses 64 bit sector numbers and so can address partitions which are theoretically
       larger than the largest disk we could support.

   MAXIMUM SIZE OF A FILESYSTEM, FILES, DIRECTORIES
       This depends on the filesystem type.  libguestfs itself does not impose any known limit.
       Consult Wikipedia or the filesystem documentation to find out what these limits are.

   MAXIMUM UPLOAD AND DOWNLOAD
       The API functions "guestfs_upload", "guestfs_download", "guestfs_tar_in",
       "guestfs_tar_out" and the like allow unlimited sized uploads and downloads.

   INSPECTION LIMITS
       The inspection code has several arbitrary limits on things like the size of Windows
       Registry hive it will read, and the length of product name.  These are intended to stop a
       malicious guest from consuming arbitrary amounts of memory and disk space on the host, and
       should not be reached in practice.  See the source code for more information.

ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
       FEBOOTSTRAP_KERNEL
       FEBOOTSTRAP_MODULES
	   When using supermin >= 4.1.0, these have been renamed "SUPERMIN_KERNEL" and
	   "SUPERMIN_MODULES".

       LIBGUESTFS_APPEND
	   Pass additional options to the guest kernel.

       LIBGUESTFS_ATTACH_METHOD
	   This is the old way to set "LIBGUESTFS_BACKEND".

       LIBGUESTFS_BACKEND
	   Choose the default way to create the appliance.  See "guestfs_set_backend" and
	   "BACKEND".

       LIBGUESTFS_CACHEDIR
	   The location where libguestfs will cache its appliance, when using a supermin
	   appliance.  The appliance is cached and shared between all handles which have the same
	   effective user ID.

	   If "LIBGUESTFS_CACHEDIR" is not set, then "TMPDIR" is used.	If "TMPDIR" is not set,
	   then "/var/tmp" is used.

	   See also "LIBGUESTFS_TMPDIR", "guestfs_set_cachedir".

       LIBGUESTFS_DEBUG
	   Set "LIBGUESTFS_DEBUG=1" to enable verbose messages.  This has the same effect as
	   calling "guestfs_set_verbose (g, 1)".

       LIBGUESTFS_MEMSIZE
	   Set the memory allocated to the qemu process, in megabytes.	For example:

	    LIBGUESTFS_MEMSIZE=700

       LIBGUESTFS_PATH
	   Set the path that libguestfs uses to search for a supermin appliance.  See the
	   discussion of paths in section "PATH" above.

       LIBGUESTFS_QEMU
	   Set the default qemu binary that libguestfs uses.  If not set, then the qemu which was
	   found at compile time by the configure script is used.

	   See also "QEMU WRAPPERS" above.

       LIBGUESTFS_TMPDIR
	   The location where libguestfs will store temporary files used by each handle.

	   If "LIBGUESTFS_TMPDIR" is not set, then "TMPDIR" is used.  If "TMPDIR" is not set,
	   then "/tmp" is used.

	   See also "LIBGUESTFS_CACHEDIR", "guestfs_set_tmpdir".

       LIBGUESTFS_TRACE
	   Set "LIBGUESTFS_TRACE=1" to enable command traces.  This has the same effect as
	   calling "guestfs_set_trace (g, 1)".

       PATH
	   Libguestfs may run some external programs, and relies on $PATH being set to a
	   reasonable value.  If using the libvirt backend, libvirt will not work at all unless
	   $PATH contains the path of qemu/KVM.  Note that PHP by default removes $PATH from the
	   environment which tends to break everything.

       SUPERMIN_KERNEL
       SUPERMIN_MODULES
	   These two environment variables allow the kernel that libguestfs uses in the appliance
	   to be selected.  If $SUPERMIN_KERNEL is not set, then the most recent host kernel is
	   chosen.  For more information about kernel selection, see supermin-helper(8).  This
	   feature is only available in supermin / febootstrap >= 3.8.

       TMPDIR
	   See "LIBGUESTFS_CACHEDIR", "LIBGUESTFS_TMPDIR".

SEE ALSO
       guestfs-examples(3), guestfs-erlang(3), guestfs-java(3), guestfs-lua(3), guestfs-ocaml(3),
       guestfs-perl(3), guestfs-python(3), guestfs-ruby(3), guestfish(1), guestmount(1),
       virt-alignment-scan(1), virt-cat(1), virt-copy-in(1), virt-copy-out(1), virt-df(1),
       virt-edit(1), virt-filesystems(1), virt-format(1), virt-inspector(1),
       virt-list-filesystems(1), virt-list-partitions(1), virt-ls(1), virt-make-fs(1),
       virt-rescue(1), virt-resize(1), virt-sparsify(1), virt-sysprep(1), virt-tar(1),
       virt-tar-in(1), virt-tar-out(1), virt-win-reg(1), guestfs-faq(1), guestfs-performance(1),
       guestfs-release-notes(1), guestfs-testing(1), libguestfs-test-tool(1),
       libguestfs-make-fixed-appliance(1), supermin(8), supermin-helper(8), qemu(1), hivex(3),
       stap(1), http://libguestfs.org/.

       Tools with a similar purpose: fdisk(8), parted(8), kpartx(8), lvm(8), disktype(1).

AUTHORS
       Richard W.M. Jones ("rjones at redhat dot com")

COPYRIGHT
       Copyright (C) 2009-2013 Red Hat Inc.

LICENSE
       This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of
       the GNU Lesser General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either
       version 2 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.

       This library is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY;
       without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
       See the GNU Lesser General Public License for more details.

       You should have received a copy of the GNU Lesser General Public License along with this
       library; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin Street, Fifth
       Floor, Boston, MA 02110-1301 USA

BUGS
       To get a list of bugs against libguestfs, use this link:
       https://bugzilla.redhat.com/buglist.cgi?component=libguestfs&product=Virtualization+Tools

       To report a new bug against libguestfs, use this link:
       https://bugzilla.redhat.com/enter_bug.cgi?component=libguestfs&product=Virtualization+Tools

       When reporting a bug, please supply:

       o   The version of libguestfs.

       o   Where you got libguestfs (eg. which Linux distro, compiled from source, etc)

       o   Describe the bug accurately and give a way to reproduce it.

       o   Run libguestfs-test-tool(1) and paste the complete, unedited output into the bug
	   report.

libguestfs-1.22.6			    2013-08-24				       guestfs(3)
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