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CPU modes (also called processor modes, CPU states, CPU privilege levels and other names) are operating modes for the central processing unit of some computer architectures that place restrictions on the type and scope of operations that can be performed by certain processes being run by the CPU.
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yppasswd(1) [opensolaris man page]

yppasswd(1)							   User Commands						       yppasswd(1)

NAME
yppasswd - change your network password in the NIS database SYNOPSIS
yppasswd [username] DESCRIPTION
The yppasswd utility changes the network password associated with the user username in the Network Information Service (NIS) database. If the user has done a keylogin(1), and a publickey/secretkey pair exists for the user in the NIS publickey.byname map, yppasswd also re- encrypts the secretkey with the new password. The NIS password may be different from the local one on your own machine. yppasswd prompts for the old NIS password, and then for the new one. You must type in the old password correctly for the change to take effect. The new password must be typed twice, to forestall mistakes. New passwords must be at least four characters long, if they use a sufficiently rich alphabet, and at least six characters long if mono- case. These rules are relaxed if you are insistent enough. Only the owner of the name or the super-user may change a password; superuser on the root master will not be prompted for the old password, and does not need to follow password construction requirements. The NIS password daemon, rpc.yppasswdd must be running on your NIS server in order for the new password to take effect. ATTRIBUTES
See attributes(5) for descriptions of the following attributes: +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ | ATTRIBUTE TYPE | ATTRIBUTE VALUE | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ |Availability |SUNWnisu | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ SEE ALSO
keylogin(1), login(1), NIS+(1), nispasswd(1), passwd(1), getpwnam(3C), getspnam(3C), secure_rpc(3NSL), nsswitch.conf(4), attributes(5) WARNINGS
Even after the user has successfully changed his or her password using this command, the subsequent login(1) using the new password will be successful only if the user's password and shadow information is obtained from NIS. See getpwnam(3C), getspnam(3C), and nsswitch.conf(4). NOTES
The use of yppasswd is discouraged, as it is now only a wrapper around the passwd(1) command, which should be used instead. Using passwd(1) with the -r nis option (see NIS+(1)) will achieve the same results, and will be consistent across all the different name services avail- able. BUGS
The update protocol passes all the information to the server in one RPC call, without ever looking at it. Thus, if you type your old pass- word incorrectly, you will not be notified until after you have entered your new password. SunOS 5.11 28 Nov 2001 yppasswd(1)

Check Out this Related Man Page

yppasswd(1)						      General Commands Manual						       yppasswd(1)

NAME
yppasswd, ypchfn, ypchsh - change your password in the NIS database SYNOPSIS
yppasswd [-f] [-l] [-p] [user] ypchfn [user] ypchsh [user] DESCRIPTION
In the old days, the standard passwd(1), chfn(1) and chsh(1) tools could not be used under Linux to change the users NIS password, shell and GECOS information. For changing the NIS information, they were replaced by their NIS counterparts, yppasswd, ypchfn and ypchsh. Today, this versions are deprecated and should not be used any longer. Using the command line switches, you can choose whether to update your password -p, your login shell -l, or your GECOS field -f, or a com- bination of them. yppasswd implies the -p option, if no other option is given. If you use the -f or -l option, you also need to add the -p flag. ypchfn implies the -f option, and ypchsh -l. When invoked without the user argument, the account information for the invoking user will be updated, otherwise that of user will be updated. This option is only available to the super-user. If the yppasswdd daemon on the server supports it, you can give the root password of the server instead of the users [old] password. All tools will first prompt the user for the current NIS password needed for authentication with the yppasswdd(8) daemon. Subsequently, the program prompts for the updated information: yppasswd or -p Change the user's NIS password. The user is prompted for the new password. While typing the password, echoing is turned off, so the password does not appear on the screen. An empty password is rejected, as are passwords shorter than six characters. The user will then be requested to retype the password to make sure it wasn't misspelled the first time. ypchsh or -l Change the user's login shell. The user is prompted for a new shell, offering the old one as default: Login shell [/bin/sh]: _ To accept the default, simply press return. To clear the shell field in your passwd(5) file entry (so that the system's default shell is selected), enter the string none. ypchfn or -f Change the user's full name and related information. Traditionally, some applications expect the GECOS field (field 4) of the passwd(5) file to contain the user's real name (as opposed to the login name) plus some additional information like the office phone number. This information is displayed by finger(1) and probably some other tools, too. When setting the full name, ypchfn displays the following prompts, with the defaults in brackets: Name [Joe Doe]: Location [2nd floor, bldg 34]: Office Phone [12345]: Home Phone []: To accept a default, simply press return. To clear a field, enter the string none. SEE ALSO
chfn(1), chsh(1), finger(1), passwd(5), passwd(1), ypcat(1), yppasswdd(8), ypserv(8), ypwhich(1) AUTHOR
yppasswd is part of the yp-tools package, which was written by Thorsten Kukuk <kukuk@linux-nis.org>. YP Tools 2.12 April 2010 yppasswd(1)