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1024th Cylandar???


 
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# 1  
Old 08-27-2002
Question 1024th Cylandar???

Hey,

I recently tried to install Red Hat Linux 7.1 on my computer. The computer has a 20g Hard drive, most of which is taken up by windows 98.

When I tried to install Linux, I formatted what was my I:\ Drive (about the 14th Gig of my system). When I tried to create the /boot partition though, I got the message "Cannot create boot partition past the 1024th Cylendar" (or something like that). Could you please tell me How many megabytes up this 1024th Cylendar is, so that I'll know where abouts to set the /boot partition.

PS: Be gentle, I'm pretty new to Linux (though not to computers).

Paul
# 2  
Old 08-27-2002
If I remember correctly, this is your BIOS's fault, not Windows, or Linux's. If your BIOS can't see the /boot area, it can't use it, right?
You might try searching google for this - I can't remember if the limitation is 8 megabytes or 8 gigabytes, or if I'm completely bassackwards and that has nothing to do with your problem...
# 3  
Old 08-28-2002
MySQL

yeah. i got the same problem earlier.

try reducing the size of your boot partition and create separate partitions for your /home, /tmp, /usr etc.

hope this helps
asif
# 4  
Old 08-28-2002
Hi KrazyGuyPaul,

The problem, I think, is with the Linux Loader (LILO).

Until Red Hat 7.1, LILO was the only one boot loader available, but since Red Hat 7.2 you have the Grub Loader, that doesn't have this problem.

If I'm not make confusing, it seems that this problem is already corrected and the newest versions of LILO doesn't have this problem.

Take a look:

[QUOTE]
Booting with LILO

The usual and recommended method to boot into Linux is using LILO (the LInux LOader). LILO can install itself in your boot sector and allows you to choose which operating system you would like at boot time. Due to a technical limitation, LILO is unable to read data from the hard drive past the 1024th cylinder--the 8GB mark for modern LBA (Logical Block Addressing) hard drives.

Does this mean you can't use the rest of your drive? Not at all. What it does mean is that your boot partitions must all live below the 8GB mark, that is, below cylinder 1024. Thus, if you want Windows to use the first 9GB of your fancy new 18GB drive, you won't be able to use LILO to boot Linux. Because of this limitation, Red Hat's Disk Druid tool for partitioning the hard drive will not allow you to create your Linux boot partition past cylinder 1024. You can still create the partitions using fdisk, but Red Hat setup will not install LILO if you do.
[\QUOTE]
# 5  
Old 08-28-2002
Hi KrazyGuyPaul,

The problem, I think, is with the Linux Loader (LILO).

Until Red Hat 7.1, LILO was the only one boot loader available, but since Red Hat 7.2 you have the Grub Loader, that doesn't have this problem.

If I'm not make confusing, it seems that this problem is already corrected and the newest versions of LILO doesn't have this problem.

Take a look:

--
Booting with LILO

The usual and recommended method to boot into Linux is using LILO (the LInux LOader). LILO can install itself in your boot sector and allows you to choose which operating system you would like at boot time. Due to a technical limitation, LILO is unable to read data from the hard drive past the 1024th cylinder--the 8GB mark for modern LBA (Logical Block Addressing) hard drives.

Does this mean you can't use the rest of your drive? Not at all. What it does mean is that your boot partitions must all live below the 8GB mark, that is, below cylinder 1024. Thus, if you want Windows to use the first 9GB of your fancy new 18GB drive, you won't be able to use LILO to boot Linux. Because of this limitation, Red Hat's Disk Druid tool for partitioning the hard drive will not allow you to create your Linux boot partition past cylinder 1024. You can still create the partitions using fdisk, but Red Hat setup will not install LILO if you do.
--

See ya!
 

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