Where to get old Unices?


 
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Operating Systems SCO Where to get old Unices?
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Old 10-14-2007
Where to get old Unices?

Hi,
I am very interested in old unices but I'm deperate, I don't know where to get these.
I'm sure they aren't sold anymore.
I'm looking for anyone of the real AT&T or SCO System Vs.

Please tell me if you happen to know where to get them Smilie

Last edited by Kotzkroete; 10-14-2007 at 08:33 AM..
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CS(1)							  The Canonical Csound Reference						     CS(1)

NAME
cs - Starts Csound with a set of options that can be controlled by environment variables, and input and output files determined by the specified filename stem. . DESCRIPTION
Starts Csound with a set of options that can be controlled by environment variables, and input and output files determined by the specified filename stem. SYNTAX
cs [-OPTIONS] <name> [CSOUND OPTIONS ... ] INITIALIZATION
Flags: o - OPTIONS = OPTIONS is a sequence of alphabetic characters that can be used for selecting the Csound executable to be run, as well as the command line flags (see below). There is a default for the option 'r' (selects real-time output), but it can be overridden. o <name> = this is the filename stem for selecting input files; it may contain a path. Files that have .csd, .orc, or .sco extension are searched, and either a CSD or an orc/sco pair that matches <name> the best are selected. MIDI files with a .mid extension are also searched, and if one that matches <name> at least as close as the CSD or orc/sco pair, it is used with the -F flag. NOTE The MIDI file is not used if any -M or -F flag is specified by the user - new in version 4.24.0) Unless there is any option (-n or -o) related to audio output, an output file name with the appropriate extension is automatically generated (based on the name of selected input files and format options). The output file is always written to the current directory. NOTE file name extensions are not case sensitive. o [CSOUND OPTIONS ... ] = any number of additional options for Csound that are simply copied to the final command line to be executed. The command line that is executed is generated from four parts: 1. Csound executable (possibly with options). This is exactly one of the following (the last one has the highest precedence): o a built-in default o the value of the CSOUND environment variable o environment variables with a name in the format of CSOUND_x where x is an uppercase letter selected by characters of the -OPTIONS string. Thus, if the -dcba option is used, and the environment variables CSOUND_B and CSOUND_C are defined, the value of CSOUND_B will take effect. 2. Any number of option lists, added in the following order: o either some built-in defaults, or the value of the CSFLAGS environment variable if it is defined. o environment variables with a name in the format of CSFLAGS_x where x is an uppercase letter selected by characters of the -OPTIONS string. Thus, if the -dcba option is used, and the environment variables CSFLAGS_A and CSFLAGS_C are defined as '-M 1 -o dac' and '-m231 -H0', respectively, the string '-m231 -H0 -M 1 -o dac' will be added. 3. The explicit options of [CSOUND OPTIONS ... ]. 4. Any options and file names generated from <name>. NOTE Quoted options that contain spaces are allowed. EXAMPLES
Assuming the following environment variables: CSOUND = csoundfltk.exe -W CSOUND_D = csound64.exe -J CSOUND_R = csoundfltk.exe -h CSFLAGS = -d -m135 -H1 -s CSFLAGS_D = -f CSFLAGS_R = -m0 -H0 -o dac1 -M "MIDI Yoke NT: 1" -b 200 -B 6000 And a directory that contains: foo.orc piano.csd foo.sco piano.mid im.csd piano2.mid ImproSculpt2_share.csd foobar.csd The following commands will execute as shown: cs foo => csoundfltk.exe -W -d -m135 -H1 -s -o foo.wav foo.orc foo.sco cs foob => csoundfltk.exe -W -d -m135 -H1 -s -o foobar.wav foobar.csd cs -r imp -i adc => csoundfltk.exe -h -d -m135 -H1 -s -m0 -H0 -o dac1 -M "MIDI Yoke NT: 1" -b 200 -B 6000 -i adc ImproSculpt2_share.csd cs -d im => csound64.exe -J -d -m135 -H1 -s -f -o im.sf im.csd cs piano => csoundfltk.exe -W -d -m135 -H1 -s -F piano.mid -o piano.wav piano.csd cs piano2 => csoundfltk.exe -W -d -m135 -H1 -s -F piano2.mid -o piano2.wav piano.csd CREDITS
Author: Istvan Varga Jan 2003 AUTHORS
Barry Vercoe MIT Media Lab Author. Dan Ellis MIT Media Lab, Cambridge Massachussetts Author. COPYRIGHT
5.10 08/01/2011 CS(1)