Visit Our UNIX and Linux User Community

Linux and UNIX Man Pages

Test Your Knowledge in Computers #240
Difficulty: Easy
In 1973, a transatlantic satellite link connected the Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR) to the ARPANET, making Norway the first country outside the US to be connected to the network.
True or False?
Linux & Unix Commands - Search Man Pages

sh(1) [osf1 man page]

sh(1)							      General Commands Manual							     sh(1)

NAME
sh - Shell, the standard command language interpreter DESCRIPTION
[Tru64 UNIX] Tru64 UNIX provides two command interpreters with the name sh. The XCU5.0 and POSIX.2 compliant command interpreter sh is available in the file /usr/bin/posix/sh and is described in the sh(1p) reference page. The Bourne shell, historically known as sh, is available in the file /usr/bin/sh and is described in the sh(1b) reference page. [Tru64 UNIX] Your initial, or login, shell is determined by your entry in the file /etc/passwd. This file can be changed only by your sys- tem administrator. You must use whatever procedures are in place at your location to have this entry changed. [Tru64 UNIX] If available on your system, you may use the passwd -s or the chsh commands to change your login shell. Note This option is not available if your site manages passwords through the Network Information Service (NIS) facility. Check with your system administrator. [Tru64 UNIX] Subsequent shells spawned from the initial shell depend on the value in the environment variable BIN_SH. If this variable is set to xpg4, the POSIX shell is started. If this variable is set to svr4, an SVR4 compliant version of the shell is started. If this vari- able is unset, the Bourne shell is started. If this variable is set to any other value, an error is reported and the results are unpre- dictable. See the EXAMPLES section for information on setting this variable. NOTES
[Tru64 UNIX] With Tru64 UNIX Version 4.0 the Korn shell, /usr/bin/ksh is the same as the POSIX shell /usr/bin/posix/sh. RESTRICTIONS
[Tru64 UNIX] The file /etc/shells must include entries for both the POSIX shell /usr/bin/posix/sh and the Bourne shell, /usr/bin/sh. If this file is incorrect, see your system administrator. EXAMPLES
Using the Bourne, Korn, or POSIX shell, to set the variable BIN_SH to use the POSIX/ XCU5.0compliant shell, enter: BIN_SH=xpg4 export BIN_SH Using the Bourne, Korn, or POSIX shell, to set the variable BIN_SH to use the SVR4 compliant shell, enter: BIN_SH=svr4 export BIN_SH Using the Bourne, Korn, or POSIX shell, to unset the variable BIN_SH, enter: unset BIN_SH Using the C/ shell, to set the variable BIN_SH to use the POSIX/XCU5.0 compliant shell, enter: setenv BIN_SH xpg4 Using the C/ shell, to set the variable BIN_SH to use the SVR4 compliant shell, enter: setenv BIN_SH svr4 Using the C/ shell, to unset the variable BIN_SH, enter: unsetenv BIN_SH FILES
User profile. Contains user information, including the login shell name. Contains the names of available and permitted shells. SEE ALSO
Commands: csh(1), ksh(1), Bourne shell sh(1b), POSIX shell sh(1p), passwd(1) Files: passwd(4), shells(4) Standards: standards(5) sh(1)

Check Out this Related Man Page

sh(1)							      General Commands Manual							     sh(1)

NAME
sh - overview of various system shells SYNOPSIS
POSIX Shell option] ... string] [arg ...] option] ... string] [arg ...] Korn Shell option] ... string] [arg ...] option] ... string] [arg ...] C Shell [command_file] [argument_list ...] Key Shell DESCRIPTION
Remarks The POSIX .2 standard requires that, on a POSIX-compliant system, executing the command activates the POSIX shell (located in file on HP-UX systems), and executing the command produces an on-line manual entry that displays the syntax of the POSIX shell command-line. However, the command has historically been associated with the conventional Bourne shell, which could confuse some users. To meet stan- dards requirements and also clarify the relationships of the various shells and where they reside on the system, this entry provides com- mand-line syntax and a brief description of each shell, and lists the names of the manual entries where each shell is described in greater detail. The Bourne shell is removed from the system starting with HP-UX 11i Version 1.5. Please use the POSIX shell as an alternative. Shell Descriptions The HP-UX operating system supports the following shells: POSIX-conforming command programming language and command interpreter residing in file Can execute commands read from a terminal or a file. This shell conforms to current POSIX standards in effect at the time the HP-UX system release was introduced, and is similar to the Korn shell in many respects. Similar in many respects to the Korn shell, the POSIX shell contains a history mechanism, supports job control, and provides various other useful features. Korn-shell command programming language and commands interpreter residing in file Can execute commands read from a terminal or a file. This shell, like the POSIX shell, contains a his- tory mechanism, supports job control, and provides various other useful features. A command language interpreter that incorporates a command history buffer, C-language-like syntax, and job control facilities. Restricted version of the POSIX shell command interpreter. Sets up a login name and execution environment whose capabilities are more controlled (restricted) than normal user shells. restricted version of the Korn-shell command interpreter Sets up a login name and execution environment whose capabilities are more controlled (restricted) than normal user shells. An extension of the standard Korn Shell that uses hierarchical softkey menus and context-sensitive help. +--------------+--------------------+ | To obtain: | Use the command: | +--------------+--------------------+ | POSIX Shell | /usr/bin/sh ... | | Korn Shell | /usr/bin/ksh ... | | C Shell | /usr/bin/csh ... | | Key Shell | /usr/bin/keysh | +--------------+--------------------+ These shells can also be the default invocation, depending on the entry in the file. See also chsh(1). WARNINGS
Many manual entries contain descriptions of shell behavior or describe program or application behavior similar to ``the shell'' with a ref- erence to ``see sh(1)''. SEE ALSO
For more information on the various individual shells, see: keysh(1) Key Shell description. ksh(1) Korn Shell description. sh-posix(1) POSIX Shell description. csh(1) C Shell description. sh(1)

Featured Tech Videos