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scconf(1M)						  System Administration Commands						scconf(1M)

NAME
scconf - update the Sun Cluster software configuration SYNOPSIS
scconf -a [-Hv] [-h node_options] [-A adapter_options] [-B switch_options] [-m cable_options] [-P privatehostname_options] [-q quorum_options] [-D devicegroup_options] [-T authentication_options] scconf -c [-Hv] [-C cluster_options] [-A adapter_options] [-B switch_options] [-m cable_options] [-P privatehostname_options] [-q quorum_options] [-D devicegroup_options] [-S slm_options] [-T authentication_options] [-w heartbeat_options] scconf -r [-Hv] [-h node_options] [-A adapter_options] [-B switch_options] [-m cable_options] [-P privatehostname_options] [-q quorum_options] [-D devicegroup_options] [-T authentication_options] scconf -p [-Hv [v]] scconf [-H] DESCRIPTION
Note - Beginning with the Sun Cluster 3.2 release, Sun Cluster software includes an object-oriented command set. Although Sun Cluster software still supports the original command set, Sun Cluster procedural documentation uses only the object-oriented command set. For more infor- mation about the object-oriented command set, see the Intro(1CL) man page. The scconf command manages the Sun Cluster software configuration. You can use scconf to add items to the configuration, to change proper- ties of previously configured items, and to remove items from the configuration. In each of these three forms of the command, options are processed in the order in which they are typed on the command line. All updates associated with each option must complete successfully before the next option is considered. The scconf command can also be used to register VxVM disk groups, SVM metasets, and raw disk groups when the disk groups or metasets con- sist of disks that use controller-based replication for data availability. Hitachi TrueCopy is an example of controller-based replication. Before using the scconf command to register disk groups and metasets, ensure that all disks in the disk group are either replicated or non- replicated, but not both. Also, you must execute the scdidadm command with the -T or -t options or the cldevice replicate command. These commands configure the DID device to use controller-based replication. For more information, see the scdidadm(1M) man page or the clde- vice(1CL) man page. The scconf command can only be run from an active cluster node. As long as the node is active in the cluster, it makes no difference which node is used to run the command. The results of running the command are always the same, regardless of the node used. The -p option of scconf enables you to print a listing of the current configuration. All forms of the scconf command accept the -H option. Specifying -H displays help information, and all other options are ignored and not executed. Help information is also printed when scconf is invoked without options. You can use this command only in the global zone. OPTIONS
Basic Options The following option is common to all forms of the scconf command: -H If this option is specified on the command line at any position, it prints help information. All other options are ignored and are not executed. Help information is also printed if scconf is invoked with no options. You can use this option only in the global zone. The following options modify the basic form and function of the scconf command. None of these options can be combined on the same command line. -a Specifies the add form of the scconf command. You can use this option only in the global zone. The -a option can be used to add or initialize most of the items that are used to define the software configuration of a Sun Cluster. Additional options are used with -a to specify elements (adapter, switch, or device group options, for example) and their associated properties to be added. Any number of these additional options can be combined on the same command line, as long as they are for use with the -a option. -c Specifies the change form of the scconf command. You can use this option only in the global zone. The -c option is used to change properties of items already configured as part of the Sun Cluster software configuration. Additional options are used with -c to specify new or changed properties. Any number of these additional options can be combined on the same com- mand line, as long as they are for use with the -c option. -p Specifies the print form of the scconf command. You can use this option only in the global zone. The -p option prints a listing of the current Sun Cluster configuration elements and their associated properties that you can configure with scconf. This option can be combined with one or more -v options to print more verbose listings. -r Specifies the remove form of the scconf command. You can use this option only in the global zone. The -r option is used to remove items from the Sun Cluster software configuration. Additional options are used with -r to specify the items to delete from the configuration. Any number of these additional options can be combined on the same command line, as long as they are for use with the -r option. Additional Options The following additional options can be combined with one or more of the previously described basic options. Refer to the SYNOPSIS section to see the options that can be used with each form of scconf. The additional options are as follows: -A adapter_options Adds, removes, or changes the properties of a cluster transport adapter. The node on which the given adapter is hosted need not be active in the cluster for these operations to succeed. The -A adapter_options for each of the three forms of the command that accept -A are described here. o Use this syntax to specify -A adapter_options for the add form of the command: -A name=adaptername,node=node[,vlanid=vlanid][,state=state] [,other_options] o Use this syntax to specify -A adapter_options for the change form of the command: -A name=adaptername,node=node[,state=state] [,other_options] o Use this syntax to specify -A adapter_options for the remove form of the command: -A name=name,node=node The -A option supports the following suboptions: name=adaptername Specifies the name of an adapter on a particular node. This suboption must be included with each occurrence of the -A option. adaptername is constructed from a device name, immediately followed by a physical-unit number (for example, hme0). node=node Specifies the name of an adapter on a particular node. A node suboption is required for each occurrence of the -A option. The node can be given either as a node name or node ID. state=state Changes the state of the adapter. You can use this suboption with the change form of the command. The state can be set to either enabled or disabled. When an adapter is added to the configuration, its state is always set to disabled. By default, adding a cable to any of the ports on an adapter changes the state of both the port and the adapter to enabled. See -m cable_options. Disabling an adapter also has the effect of disabling all ports associated with that adapter. However, enabling an adapter does not result in the enabling of its ports. To enable an adapter port, you must enable the cable to which the port is connected. trtype=type Specifies the transport type. This suboption must be included when -A is used with the add form of the command. An example of a transport type is dlpi. See sctransp_dlpi(7P). [vlanid=vlanid] Specifies the VLAN ID of the tagged-VLAN adapter. [other_options] If other options are available for a particular adapter type, they can be used with -A in the add and change forms of the command. Refer to the cluster transport adapter man pages (for example, scconf_transp_adap_hme(1M), scconf_transp_adap_eri(1M), and scconf_transp_adap_sci(1M)) for information about special options. You need solaris.cluster.transport.modify RBAC authorization to use this command option with -a, -c, or -r. See rbac(5). -B switch_options Adds, removes, or changes the properties of a cluster transport switch, also called transport junction. Examples of such devices can include, but are not limited to, Ethernet hubs, other switches of various types, and rings. The -B switch_options for each of the three forms of the command that accept -B are described here. o Use this syntax to specify -B switch_options for the add form of the command: -B type=type,name=name[,other_options] o Use this syntax to specify -B switch_options for the change form of the command: -B name=name[,state=state][,other_options] o Use this syntax to specify -B switch_options for the remove form of the command: -B name=name The -B option supports the following suboptions: name=name Specifies the name of a cluster transport switch. A name suboption must be included with each occurrence of the -B option. name can be up to 256 characters in length. It is made up of either letters or digits, with the first character being a letter. Each transport switch name must be unique across the namespace of the cluster. state=state Changes the state of a cluster transport switch. This suboption can be used with a -B change command. state can be set to either enabled or disabled. When a switch is added to the configuration, its state is always set to disabled. By default, adding a cable to any of the ports on a switch changes the state of both the port and the switch to enabled. See -m cable_options. Disabling a switch also has the effect of disabling all ports associated with that switch. However, enabling a switch does not result in the enabling of its ports. To enable a switch port, you must enable the cable to which the port is connected. type=type Specifies a cluster transport switch type. This suboption must be included when -B is used with the add form of the command. Ethernet hubs and SCI switches are examples of cluster transport switches of type switch. The man pages scconf_transp_jct_dolphin- switch(1M) and scconf_transp_jct_etherswitch(1M) contain more information. [other_options] When other options are available for a particular switch type, they can be used with -B in the add and change forms of the command. Refer to the cluster transport switch man pages (for example, scconf_transp_jct_dolphinswitch(1M) and scconf_transp_jct_ether- switch(1M)) for information about special options. You need solaris.cluster.transport.modify RBAC authorization to use this command option with -a, -c, or -r. See rbac(5). -C cluster_options Changes the name of the cluster itself. This option can only be used with the change form of the command. Specify cluster_options for the change form of the command as follows: -C cluster=clustername This form of the command changes the name of the cluster to clustername. -D devicegroup_options Adds device groups to the configuration, changes or resets properties of existing device groups, or removes groups from the Sun Cluster device groups configuration. Other device group options (other_options) play a crucial role in adding or changing device groups and their options. Pay special attention to the man pages for the type-dependent device group options (for example, scconf_dg_vxvm(1M), scconf_dg_svm(1M), and scconf_dg_rawdisk(1M)) when configuring any device group. Not all device group types support all three forms of the -D option. For example, svm device groups can normally only be used with the change form of the command to change certain attributes, such as the ordering of the node preference list. The add form of the command can be used to either create device groups or to add nodes to existing device groups. For some device group types, the add form can also be used to add devices to a group. The change form of the command registers updates to change certain attributes associated with a group. The remove form of the command is used to either remove an entire device group or one or more of a group's components. The -D devicegroup_options for each of the three forms of the scconf command that accept -D are as follows: Add: -D type=type,name=name[,nodelist=node[:node]...] [,preferenced={true | false}] [,numsecondaries=integer] [,failback={enabled | disabled}][,other_options] Change: -D name=name[,nodelist=node[:node]...] [,preferenced={true | false}] [,numsecondaries=integer] [,failback={enabled | disabled}][,other_options] Remove: -D name=name,nodelist=node[:node]... The -D option supports the following suboptions: name=name The name of the device group. This name must be supplied with all three forms of the command. nodelist=node[:node]... A list of potential primary nodes that is required for some device group types when adding a group to the cluster. For the vxvm device group type, the concept of primary nodes does not apply when the localonly property is set to true. Refer to the man pages for the type-dependent device group for more information. The nodelist suboption is required when you set the preferenced suboption to true. With the add form of the command, the nodelist is, by default, an ordered list indicating the preferred order in which nodes should attempt to take over as the primary node for a device group. However, if the preferenced suboption is set to false (see the next subsection), the first node to access a device in the group automatically becomes the primary node for that group. The preferenced suboption cannot be used when adding nodes to an existing device group. However, the preferenced suboption can be used when you create the group for the first time, or with the change form of the command. To change the primary node order preference, you must specify the complete list of cluster nodes in the nodelist in the order that you prefer. You must also set the preferenced suboption to true. When used with the remove form of the command, the nodelist suboption is used to remove the indicated nodes from the device group. Only by not providing a nodelist can the entire device group be removed. Simply removing all of the nodes from a device group does not necessarily remove that group. type=type The type of device group. The type must be used with the add form of the command to indicate the type of device group to create (for example, vxvm or rawdisk). [failback={enabled | disabled}] Enables or disables the failback behavior of a device group with either the add or the change form of the command. Specifies the behavior of the system should a device group primary node leave the cluster membership and later return. When the node leaves the cluster membership, the device group fails over to the secondary node. When the failed node rejoins the cluster membership, the device group can either continue to be mastered by the secondary node, or fail back to the original primary node. If failback is enabled, the device group becomes mastered by the original primary node. If failback is disabled, the device group continues to be mastered by the secondary node. By default, failback is disabled. [numsecondaries=integer] Enables you to dynamically change the desired number of secondary nodes for a device group. A device group is an HA service that requires one node to act as a primary node and one or more nodes to act as secondary nodes. The secondary nodes of a device group are able to take over and act as the primary node if the current primary node fails. This integer value should be greater than 0 but less than the total number of nodes in the specified group. The default is 1. A system administrator can use the numsecondaries suboption to change the number of secondary nodes for a device group while main- taining a given level of availability. If a node in a device group is removed from the secondary nodes list, it is not able to take over and act as a primary node until it is converted back to a secondary node. Before making a change to the number of secondary nodes, you need to assess the impact on the secondary global file system. The numsecondaries suboption only applies to nodes in a device group that are currently in cluster mode and can be used together with the node's preferenced suboption. If a device's preferenced suboption is enabled, the nodes that are least preferred are removed from the secondary nodes list first. If no node in a device group is flagged as preferred, the cluster randomly picks the node to remove. When a device group's actual number of secondary nodes drops to less that the desired level due to node failures, nodes that were removed from the secondary nodes list are added back to the secondary list of nodes if they are currently in a cluster, belong to the device group, and are not currently a primary or a secondary node. The conversion starts with the node in the device group with the highest preference until the number of desired secondary nodes is matched. If a node in the device group has a higher preference than an existing secondary node and joins the cluster, the node with the least preference is removed from the secondary nodes list and is replaced by the newly added node. This replacement only occurs when there are more actual secondary nodes than the desired level. To set the desired number of secondary nodes to the system default (without having to know the default value), issue one of these commands: # scconf -aD type=vxvm,name=foo, nodelist=node1:node2,numsecondaries= or # scconf -cD name=foo,numsecondaries= The numsecondaries suboption can only be used with the -a option when a device group is created. The numsecondaries suboption can- not be used with the -a option to add a host to an existing device group. [preferenced={true | false}] Indicates the status of the preferred order of potential primary nodes for a device group. As long as the preferenced suboption is not set to false, node lists for newly created device groups indicate a preferred order in which nodes attempt to take over as the primary node for a device group. If you set the preferenced suboption to true, you must also use the nodelist subopton to specify the entire node list. If the preferenced suboption is not specified with an add that is used to create a device group, it is, by default, false. However, if the preferenced suboption is not specified with a change, it is, by default, set to true when nodelist is given. The preferenced suboption cannot be used with an add that is used to add nodes to an established device group. In this case, the established node preference list setting is used. [other_options] You can use other device group type-dependent options with either the add or change form of the command. Refer to the appropriate man pages for more information (for example, scconf_dg_vxvm(1M), scconf_dg_svm(1M), and scconf_dg_rawdisk(1M)). You need solaris.cluster.device.modify RBAC authorization to use this command option with -a, -c, or -r. See rbac(5). -h node_options Adds or removes a node from the cluster configuration database. When used with the add form of scconf, both the new name and an inter- nally generated node ID are added to the cluster configuration database. In addition, the new node is given a disk reservation key and a quorum vote count of zero. The name that is assigned to access the node over the cluster interconnect is initialized to clusternoden- odeid-priv. See the -p option to learn more about printing configuration elements and their associated properties. scconf cannot be used by itself to add a new node to the cluster. You can only use scconf to update the configuration database itself. scconf does not copy the configuration database onto the new node or create the necessary node identifier on the new node. To add a node to a cluster, use scinstall(1M). When used with the remove form of scconf, all references to the node, including the last transport cable, all resource group refer- ences, and all device group references must be removed before scconf can be used to completely remove the node from the cluster config- uration. The node to be removed must not be configured for any quorum devices. In addition, you cannot remove a node from a three-node cluster unless there is at least one shared quorum device configured. The system administration procedures in the Sun Cluster documentation describe how to remove a cluster node in more detail. You must specify the node=node suboption with any occurrence of the -h option. For the add form of the command, the given node must be a node name. Use this syntax to specify the -h node_options for the add form of the command: -h node=nodename For the remove form of the command, the node can be given either as a node name or node ID. Use this syntax to specify the -h node_options for the remove form of the command: -h node=node You need solaris.cluster.node.modify RBAC authorization to use this command option with -a, -c, or -r. See rbac(5). -m cable_options Helps to establish the cluster interconnect topology. This option helps by configuring the cables that are connecting the various ports that are found on the cluster transport adapters and switches. Each new cable typically maps a connection either between two cluster transport adapters or between an adapter and a port on a transport switch. The -m cable_options for each of the forms of the command that accept -m are as follows: o Use this syntax to specify the -m cable_options for the add form of the command: -m endpoint=[node:]name[@port], endpoint=[node:]name[@port][,noenable] o Use this syntax to specify the -m cable_options for the change form of the command: -m endpoint=[node:]name[@port],state=state o Use this syntax to specify the -m cable_options for the remove form of the command: -m endpoint=[node:]name[@port] The -m option supports the following suboptions: endpoint=[node:]name[@port] Must be included with each occurrence of the -m option. For the add form of the command, two endpoint options must be specified. The name component of the option argument is used to specify the name of either a cluster transport adapter or cluster transport switch at one of the endpoints of a cable. If a node component is given, the name is the name of a cluster transport adapter. Oth- erwise, the name is the name of a cluster transport switch. If a port component is not given, an attempt is made to assume a default port name. The default port for an adapter is always 0. The default port name for a switch endpoint is equal to the node ID of the node attached to the other end of the cable. Refer to the cluster transport adapter and cluster transport switch man pages for more information about port assignments and other require- ments (for example,scconf_transp_adap_hme(1M), scconf_transp_adap_eri(1M), scconf_transp_adap_sci(1M), scconf_transp_jct_ether- switch(1M), and scconf_transp_jct_dolphinswitch(1M)). Before a cable can be added, the adapters and switches at each of the two endpoints of the cable must already be configured (see -A and -B). noenable Can be used when adding a cable to the configuration. By default, when you add a cable, the state of the cable, the two ports to which it is connected, and the adapters or switches on which the ports are found, are set to enable. But, if noenable is specified when you add a cable, the cable and its two endpoints are added in the disabled state. The state of the adapters or switches on which the ports are found remains unchanged. state=state Changes the state of a cable and the two endpoints to which it is connected. When a cable is enabled, the cable, its two ports, and the adapters or switches that are associated with those two ports are all enabled. However, when a cable is disabled, only the cable and its two ports are disabled. The state of the adapters or switches that are associated with the two ports remains unchanged. By default, the state of a cable and its endpoints is always set to enabled at the time that the cable is added to the configuration. But to add a cable in the disabled state, use the noenable suboption as part of an add operation. You need solaris.cluster.transport.modify RBAC authorization to use this command option with -a, -c, or -r. See rbac(5). -P privatehostname_options For a node, adds or changes the private hostname. For a non-global zone, adds or removes the private IP address and the private host- name, or changes the private hostname. When used with the add (-a) form of the command, the -P option specifies one of the following actions: o When a node is specified, the command assigns the specified hostname alias to use for IP access of the specified node over the private cluster interconnect, or transport. If not otherwise assigned or if reset, the default private hostname for the node is clusternodenodeid-priv. o When a non-global zone is specified, the command assigns the specified zone private IP address and plumbs this IP address over the private interconnect. This IP address is automatically chosen from available addresses in the cluster private IP address range. The command also assigns the specified hostname alias to use for IP access of the specified zone over the private cluster interconnect. The hostname must not be used by any other zone or node in the enterprise. The private IP address range that is configured for the cluster must support the increased number of private IP addresses that are used in the cluster. Ensure that the private IP address range can support the added private IP address before you assign one to a zone. See the scprivipadm(1M) man page for more information. When used with the change (-c) form of the command, the -P option changes the hostname alias for the specified node or non-global zone. When used with the remove (-r) form of the command, the -P option frees the IP address that is assigned to the specified non-global zone. This removal makes the IP address available for use elsewhere. The zone private hostname is not removed, but it will no longer be resolved to the removed private IP address. The remove form of the command is only valid for zones. Private hostnames should never be stored in the hosts(4) database. A special nsswitch facility (see nsswitch.conf(4)) performs all hostname lookups for private hostnames. The privatehostname_options for each of the forms of the command that accept -P are as follows: Add: -P node=node[,privatehostname=hostalias] -P node=node:zone,zprivatehostname=hostalias Change: -P node=node[,privatehostname=hostalias] -P node=node:zone,zprivatehostname=hostalias Remove: -P node=node:zone The -P option supports the following suboptions: node=node Provides the name or ID of the node to be assigned the specified private hostname, or host alias, that is supplied with the pri- vatehostname suboption. node=node:zone Provides the name of the non-global zone to be assigned a zone private IP address and the specified private hostname, or host alias, that is supplied with the zprivatehostname suboption. privatehostname=hostalias Supplies the host alias to be used for accessing the node over the private cluster interconnect, or transport. If no privatehost- name suboption is specified, the private hostname for the specified node is reset to the default. zprivatehostname=hostalias Supplies the host alias to be used for accessing the non-global zone over the private cluster interconnect, or transport. You must specify the zprivatehostname suboption; there is no default host alias for zones. You need solaris.cluster.transport.modify RBAC authorization to use this command option with -a, -c, or -r. See rbac(5). -q quorum_options Manages shared cluster quorum devices and various cluster quorum properties. Pay special attention to the man pages for type-dependent quorum device options (for example, scconf_quorum_dev_scsi(1M) and scconf_quorum_dev_netapp_nas(1M). Caution - Devices that use controller-based replication cannot be used as quorum devices in the Sun Cluster environment. If you specify a device that uses controller-based replication using the -q option, the scconf command returns an error. The add and remove forms of the command add and remove shared quorum devices to or from the configuration. The change form of the com- mand changes various cluster quorum configuration properties or states. The -q quorum_options available for each of the three forms of the command can be used to change the cluster quorum configuration as follows: Add: -q name=devicename,type={scsi | netapp_nas} For SCSI quorum devices only: -q autoconfig[,noop] Change: -q node=node,{maintstate | reset} -q name=devicename,{maintstate | reset} -q reset -q installmode For SCSI quorum devices only: -q autoconfig[,noop] Remove: -q name=devicename When scconf is interrupted or fails while performing quorum-related operations, quorum configuration information can become inconsis- tent in the cluster configuration database. If this occurs, either run the same scconf command again or run it with the reset suboption to reset the quorum information. The -q option supports the following suboptions: autoconfig When used with the add form of the command, automatically chooses and assigns one quorum device in the two-node cluster. The quorum device is chosen from the available devices. If a quorum device is already configured, the command aborts. When used with the change form of the command, automatically chooses and assigns one device that replaces all existing quorum devices in the two-node cluster. The quorum device is chosen from the available devices. All available devices in the cluster must be qualified to be a quorum device. The autoconfig suboption does not assess whether an available device is qualified to be a quorum device. If the cluster contains more than two nodes, the autoconfig suboption makes no changes to the quorum configuration. Do not use the autoconfig suboption if you intend to configure a NAS device as quorum. installmode Forces the cluster back into installation mode. While in installmode, nodes do not attempt to reset their quorum configurations at boot time. Also, while in this mode, many administrative functions are blocked. When a cluster is first installed, it is set up with installmode set. Once all of the nodes have joined the cluster for the first time, and shared quorum devices have been added to the configuration, issue scconf -c -q reset to reset the vote counts to their default values and to clear the installmode set- ting. name=devicename Specifies the name of an attached shared storage device to use when adding or removing a shared quorum device to or from the clus- ter. This suboption can also be used with the change form of the command to change the state of a quorum device. Each quorum device must be connected, or ported, to at least two nodes in the cluster. It is not possible to use a non-shared disk as a quorum device. The change form of scconf can be used with -q name to either put the device into a maintenance state or to reset the device's quo- rum configuration to the default. While in maintenance state, the device takes on a vote count of zero and, so, does not partici- pate in forming quorum. When reset to the default, the vote count for the device is changed to N-1, where N is the number of nodes with nonzero vote counts that have ports to the device. node=node When used with the add form of the command, selects the nodes that should be configured with ports to the shared quorum device being added. This suboption can also be used with the change form of the command to change the quorum state of a node. When the node suboption is used with the change form of the quorum update command, it is used to either place a node into mainte- nance state or to reset the node's quorum configuration to the default. You must shut down a node before you can put it into maintenance state. scconf returns an error if you attempt to put a cluster member into maintenance state. While in maintenance state, the node takes on a vote count of zero and, so, does not participate in quorum formation. In addition, any shared quorum devices configured with ports to the node have their vote counts adjusted down by one to reflect the new state of the node. When the node is reset to the default, its vote count is reset to 1 and the shared quorum device vote counts are re- adjusted back up. Unless the cluster is in installmode, the quorum configuration for each node is automatically reset at boot time. A node can be specified as either a node name or a node ID. type=type When used with the add form of the command, specifies the type of quorum device to create. scsi Specifies a shared disk quorum device. See scconf_quorum_dev_scsi(1M) for SCSI-type-specific options. netapp_nas Specifies a Network Appliance NAS quorum device. See scconf_quorum_dev_netapp_nas(1M) for NAS-type-specific options. {maintstate} When used as a flag with the change form of the command, for either the globaldev or node suboptions, puts a shared quorum device or node into a quorum maintenance state. When in maintenance state, a shared device or node no longer participates in quorum forma- tion. This feature can be useful when a node or device must be shut down for an extended period of maintenance. Once a node boots back into the cluster, under usual circumstances, it removes itself from maintenance mode. It is not legal to specify both maintstate and reset with the same -q option. [,noop] Is valid with the autoconfig suboption. The command prints to standard output the list of quorum devices that the autoconfig subop- tion would add or change. The autoconfig,noop suboption makes no changes to the quorum configuration. {reset} When used as a flag with the change form of the command, resets the configured quorum vote count of a shared quorum device or node. This option can be combined with either the globaldev or node suboptions, or it can be its own suboption. If used by itself, the entire quorum configuration is reset to the default vote count settings. In addition, if installmode is set, it is cleared by a global quorum configuration reset. installmode cannot be reset on a two-node cluster unless at least one shared quorum device has been successfully configured. otheroptions You can use other quorum-device-type-specific options. Refer to scconf_quorum_dev_scsi(1M) and scconf_quorum_dev_netapp_nas(1M) for details. You need solaris.cluster.quorum.modify RBAC authorization to use this command option with -a, -c, or -r. See rbac(5). -S slm_options When used with the change form of the sconf command, sets properties to configure system resource control. If you do not assign a value to these properties, they are set automatically to the default value. You can set the -S option on the Solaris 9 operation system but this configuration is only applied on Solaris 10 or later versions of this operating system. The syntax for the -S option is: -S [node=node] [,globalzoneshares=integer] [,defaultpsetmin=integer] The -S option supports the following suboptions: globalzoneshares=globalzoneshares Sets the number of shares that are assigned to the global zone. The lower limit for globalzoneshares is 1 and the upper limit is 65,535. To understand this upper limit, see the prctl(1) man page for information about the zone.cpu-shares attribute. The default value for globalzoneshares is 1. If, on a running cluster, there are no longer any online resource groups with CPU control config- ured in the global zone, the number CPU shares assigned to the global zone is set to the value of globalzoneshares. defaultpsetmin=defaultpsetmin Sets the minimum number of CPU available in the default processor set. The default value is 1. The minimum value of defaultpsetmin is 1. Sun Cluster assigns a number of CPU as close as possible to the number you set for defaultpsetmin within the limit of avail- able CPU. If the number assigned is lower than the number you requested Sun Cluster periodically attempts to assign the number of CPU you requested. This action might destroy some dedicated_weak processor sets. For information about dedicated_weak processor sets, see the scrgadm(1M) man page. node=node Identifies nodes on which properties are to be set. Set these properties on each node you want to benefit from CPU control by spec- ifying the name of the node. For each usage of the -S option, you can specify one node. You need solaris.cluster.node.modify RBAC authorization to use this command option with -c. See rbac(5). -T authentication_options Establishes authentication policies for nodes that are attempting to add themselves to the cluster configuration. Specifically, when a machine requests that it be added to the cluster as a cluster node (see scinstall(1M)), a check is made to determine whether or not the node has permission to join. If the node has permission, the joining node is authenticated. By default, any machine is allowed to add itself to the cluster. The -T authentication_options for each of the three forms of the command that accept -T are as follows: Add: -T node=nodename[,...][,authtype=authtype] Change: -T authtype=authtype Remove: -T {node=nodename[,...] | all} The -T option supports the following suboptions: all You can clear the list of all node names by specifying scconf -r -T all. A cleared authentication list means that any node can attempt to install and configure itself in the cluster. node=nodename Adds or removes hostnames from the list of nodes that are able to install and configure themselves as nodes in the cluster. At least one node suboption is required for the add form of the command and is optional for remove. If the authentication list is empty, any host can request that it be added to the cluster configuration. However, if the list has at least one name in it, all such requests are authenticated using the authentication list. Illegal nodenames are accepted, including the node name of dot (.). The dot character is special in that if a nodename of . is added to the authentication list, all other names are removed. This feature prevents a host from attempting to install and config- ure itself in the cluster. authtype=authtype Is used with either the add or change form of the command. The only currently supported authentication types (authtype) are des and sys (or unix). The default authentication type is sys, which provides the least amount of secure authentication. When des, or Diffie-Hellman, authentication is used, entries should be added to the publickey database for each cluster node to be added before actually running the scinstall command to add the node. You need solaris.cluster.node.modify RBAC authorization to use this command option with -a, -c, or -r. See rbac(5). -v When used with the -p option, requests a more verbose, or detailed, listing of the cluster configuration. If used with other options, additional information might be printed when an error is encountered. You need solaris.cluster.device.read, solaris.cluster.transport.read, solaris.cluster.resource.read, solaris.cluster.node.read, solaris.cluster.quorum.read, and solaris.cluster.system.read RBAC authorizations to use this command option with -p. See rbac(5). -w heartbeat_options Changes the global heartbeat parameters of a cluster, which effectively changes the heartbeat parameters across all the adapters of the cluster. Sun Cluster relies on heartbeats over the private interconnect to detect communication failures among cluster nodes. Reducing the heartbeat timeout enables Sun Cluster to detect failures more quickly, as the time that is required to detect failures decreases when you decrease the values of heartbeat timeout. Thus, Sun Cluster recovers more quickly from failures, consequently increasing the avail- ability of your cluster. The -w option supports the following suboptions: heartbeat_quantum=quantum_milliseconds Defines how often to send heartbeats. Sun Cluster uses a 1 second (1,000 milliseconds) heartbeat quantum by default. Specify a value between 100 milliseconds and 10,000 milliseconds. heartbeat_timeout=timeout_milliseconds The time interval after which, if no heartbeats are received from the peer nodes, the corresponding path is declared as down. Sun Cluster uses a 10 second (10,000 millisecond) heartbeat timeout by default. Specify a value between 2,500 milliseconds and 60,000 milliseconds. Note - Even under ideal conditions, when you reduce the values of heartbeat parameters with -w, there is always a risk that spurious path timeouts and node panics might occur. Always test and thoroughly qualify the lower values of heartbeat parameters under relevant workload conditions before actually implementing them in your cluster. USAGE
With the -w option, you can change only one heartbeat suboption at a time. When decreasing the values of heartbeat parameters, change heartbeat_quantum first, followed by heartbeat_timeout. When increasing the values of heartbeat parameters, change heartbeat_timeout first, followed by heartbeat_quantum. Note - The value you specify for heartbeat_timeout must always be greater than or equal to five times the value you specify for heartbeat_quan- tum (heartbeat_timeout >= (5*heartbeat_quantum)). You need solaris.cluster.system.modify RBAC authorization to use -w. See rbac(5). EXAMPLES
Example 1 Decreasing the Heartbeat The following example shows how to decrease the heartbeat quantum to 100 milliseconds from the Sun Cluster default of 1,000 milliseconds. This example also shows how to decrease the heartbeat timeout to 2500 milliseconds from the Sun Cluster default of 10,000 milliseconds. phys-schost-1# scconf -c -w heartbeat_quantum=100 phys-schost-1# scconf -c -w heartbeat_timeout=2500 Because heartbeat_timeout must always be greater than or equal to five times heartbeat_quantum, you need to set heartbeat_quantum first. Otherwise, the requirement is not met. In other words, if heartbeat_quantum is currently set to the default 1,000 milliseconds, and if you were to set heartbeat_timeout to 2500 milliseconds, heartbeat_timeout would be less than five times heartbeat_quantum. The scconf command would consequently fail. Once heartbeat_quantum is set to the correct value however, the requirement is maintained, and you can then set heartbeat_timeout to the decreased value. Example 2 Increasing the Heartbeat The following example shows how to increase the heartbeat timeout and heartbeat quantum to Sun Cluster default values from the values to which you set these parameters in the previous example. phys-schost-1# scconf -c -w heartbeat_timeout=10000 phys-schost-1# scconf -c -w heartbeat_quantum=1000 You set heartbeat_timeout first to maintain the requirement that heartbeat_timeout always be greater than or equal to five times heart- beat_quantum. Once heartbeat_timeout is set to the value you want, you can then set heartbeat_quantum to the new, increased value. Example 3 Typical Postinstallation Setup Operations The following commands provide an example of a typical set of postinstallation setup operations that might be performed on a new two-node cluster. These commands add a shared quorum device to the cluster, clear installmode, configure a second set of cluster transport connec- tions, and secure the cluster against other machines that might attempt to add themselves to the cluster: phys-red# scconf -a -q globaldev=d0 phys-red# scconf -c -q reset phys-red# scconf -a -A trtype=dlpi,name=hme1,node=phys-red -A trtype=dlpi,name=hme1,node=phys-green -m endpoint=phys-red:hme1,endpoint=phys-green:hme1 phys-red# scconf -a -T node=. EXIT STATUS
The following exit values are returned: 0 The command completed successfully. nonzero An error has occurred. ATTRIBUTES
See attributes(5) for descriptions of the following attributes: +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ | ATTRIBUTE TYPE | ATTRIBUTE VALUE | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ |Availability |SUNWsczu | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ |Interface Stability |Evolving | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ SEE ALSO
Intro(1CL), cldevice(1CL), scconf_dg_rawdisk(1M), scconf_dg_svm(1M), scconf_dg_vxvm(1M), scconf_quorum_dev_scsi(1M), scconf_quo- rum_dev_netapp_nas(1M), scconf_transp_adap_bge(1M), scconf_transp_adap_ce(1M), scconf_transp_adap_e1000g(1M), scconf_transp_adap_eri(1M), scconf_transp_adap_ge(1M), scconf_transp_adap_hme(1M), scconf_transp_adap_ibd(1M), scconf_transp_adap_qfe(1M), scconf_transp_adap_sci(1M), scconf_transp_jct_dolphinswitch(1M), scconf_transp_jct_etherswitch(1M), scconf_transp_jct_ibswitch(1M), scdidadm(1M), scprivipadm(1M), hosts(4), nsswitch.conf(4), publickey(4), attributes(5), sctransp_dlpi(7P) WARNINGS
Use the -w option only when all nodes in a cluster are up. Do not use -w when any node in a cluster is down. Nodes might hang or panic as a result. Clusters that contain one or more single-CPU nodes, or that contain more than eight nodes, are more likely to experience timeouts and node panics when the clusters run with low heartbeat parameter values. Note - Even under ideal conditions, when you reduce the values of heartbeat parameters with -w, there is always a risk that spurious path time- outs and node panics might occur. Always test and thoroughly qualify the lower values of heartbeat parameters under relevant workload conditions before actually implementing them in your cluster. NOTES
You should either back up the root file system on every node after changing the configuration with scconf, or keep a log of all changes. If you need to recover configuration changes between normal system backups, use the log to return to the most recent configuration. Option lists specified with the scconf command are always executed in the order that you specify them on the command line. But, whenever possible, certain transport options (-A, -B, and -m) are processed by scconf as a single transaction against the cluster configuration database. Try to group all related options of this type together on a single command line to reduce overhead to the cluster. Sun Cluster 3.2 2 Aug 2006 scconf(1M)

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