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reboot(8) [freebsd man page]

REBOOT(8)						    BSD System Manager's Manual 						 REBOOT(8)

NAME
reboot, halt, fastboot, fasthalt -- stopping and restarting the system SYNOPSIS
halt [-lnpq] [-k kernel] reboot [-dlnpq] [-k kernel] fasthalt [-lnpq] [-k kernel] fastboot [-dlnpq] [-k kernel] DESCRIPTION
The halt and reboot utilities flush the file system cache to disk, send all running processes a SIGTERM (and subsequently a SIGKILL) and, respectively, halt or restart the system. The action is logged, including entering a shutdown record into the user accounting database. The options are as follows: -d The system is requested to create a crash dump. This option is supported only when rebooting, and it has no effect unless a dump device has previously been specified with dumpon(8). -k kernel Boot the specified kernel on the next system boot. If the kernel boots successfully, the default kernel will be booted on successive boots, this is a one-shot option. If the boot fails, the system will continue attempting to boot kernel until the boot process is interrupted and a valid kernel booted. This may change in the future. -l The halt or reboot is not logged to the system log. This option is intended for applications such as shutdown(8), that call reboot or halt and log this themselves. -n The file system cache is not flushed. This option should probably not be used. -p The system will turn off the power if it can. If the power down action fails, the system will halt or reboot normally, depending on whether halt or reboot was called. -q The system is halted or restarted quickly and ungracefully, and only the flushing of the file system cache is performed (if the -n option is not specified). This option should probably not be used. The fasthalt and fastboot utilities are nothing more than aliases for the halt and reboot utilities. Normally, the shutdown(8) utility is used when the system needs to be halted or restarted, giving users advance warning of their impending doom and cleanly terminating specific programs. SEE ALSO
getutxent(3), boot(8), dumpon(8), nextboot(8), savecore(8), shutdown(8), sync(8) HISTORY
A reboot utility appeared in Version 6 AT&T UNIX. BSD
October 11, 2010 BSD

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REBOOT(8)						    BSD System Manager's Manual 						 REBOOT(8)

NAME
reboot, poweroff, halt -- restarting, powering down and stopping the system SYNOPSIS
halt [-dlnpqvxz] poweroff [-dlnqvxz] reboot [-dlnqvxz] [arg ...] DESCRIPTION
The poweroff, halt and reboot utilities flush the file system cache to disk, send all running processes a SIGTERM, wait for up to 30 seconds for them to die, send a SIGKILL to the survivors and, respectively, power down, halt or restart the system. The action is logged, including entering a shutdown record into the login accounting file and sending a message via syslog(3). The options are as follows: -d Create a dump before halting or restarting. This option is useful for debugging system dump procedures or capturing the state of a corrupted or misbehaving system. -l Suppress sending a message via syslog(3) before halting or restarting. -n Do not flush the file system cache. This option should be used with extreme caution. It can be used if a disk or a processor is on fire. -p Attempt to powerdown the system. If the powerdown fails, or the system does not support software powerdown, the system will halt. This option is only valid for halt. -v To enable verbose messages on the console, pass the boothowto(9) flag AB_VERBOSE to reboot(2). -x To enable debugging messages on the console, pass the boothowto(9) flag AB_DEBUG to reboot(2). -z To silence some shutdown messages on the console, pass the boothowto(9) flag AB_SILENT to reboot(2). -q Do not give processes a chance to shut down before halting or restarting. This option should not normally be used. If there are any arguments passed to reboot they are concatenated with spaces and passed as bootstr to the reboot(2) system call. The string is passed to the firmware on platforms that support it. Normally, the shutdown(8) utility is used when the system needs to be halted or restarted, giving users advance warning of their impending doom. SEE ALSO
reboot(2), syslog(3), utmp(5), boot(8), init(8), rescue(8), shutdown(8), sync(8) HISTORY
A reboot command appeared in Version 6 AT&T UNIX. The poweroff command first appeared in NetBSD 1.5. CAVEATS
Once the command has begun its work, stopping it before it completes will probably result in a system so crippled it must be physically reset. To prevent premature termination, the command blocks many signals early in its execution. However, nothing can defend against delib- erate attempts to evade this. This command will stop the system without running any shutdown(8) scripts. Amongst other things, this means that swapping will not be dis- abled so that raid(4) can shutdown cleanly. You should normally use shutdown(8) unless you are running in single user mode. BUGS
The single user shell will ignore the SIGTERM signal. To avoid waiting for the timeout when rebooting or halting from the single user shell, you have to exec reboot or exec halt. BSD
February 16, 2011 BSD

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