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ssh-askpass-fullscreen(1) [debian man page]

SSH-ASKPASS-FULLSCREEN(1)				      General Commands Manual					 SSH-ASKPASS-FULLSCREEN(1)

NAME
ssh-askpass-fullscreen - A simple replacement for ssh-askpass written with gtk2 SYNOPSIS
ssh-askpass-fullscreen DESCRIPTION
This manual page was written for the Debian distribution because the original program does not have a manual page. gnome-ssh-askpass is a GNOME-based passphrase dialog for use with OpenSSH. It is intended to be called by the ssh-add(1) program and not invoked directly. It allows ssh-add(1) to obtain a passphrase from a user, even if not connected to a terminal (assuming that an X display is available). This happens auto-matically in the case where ssh-add is invoked from one's ~/.xsession or as one of the GNOME startup pro- grams, for example. In order to be called automatically by ssh-add, ssh-askpass-fullscreen should be installed as /usr/bin/ssh-askpass ssh-askpass-fullscreen is a program that... ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
The following environment variables are recognized: GNOME_SSH_ASKPASS_GRAB_SERVER Causes gnome-ssh-askpass to grab the X server before asking for a passphrase. GNOME_SSH_ASKPASS_GRAB_POINTER Causes gnome-ssh-askpass to grab the mouse pointer will be grabbed too. These may have some benefit to security if you don't trust your X server. Keyboard is always grabbed. SEE ALSO ssh-add(1), ssh-askpass(1). AUTHOR
This manual page was written by Marco Presi (Zufus) <zufus@debian.org>, for the Debian GNU/Linux system (but may be used by others) and it is based on that for x11-ssh-askpass by Philip Hands and the one for gnome-ssh-askpass by Colin Watson <cjwatson@debian.org> May 8 , 2004 SSH-ASKPASS-FULLSCREEN(1)

Check Out this Related Man Page

SSH-ADD(1)                                                  BSD General Commands Manual                                                 SSH-ADD(1)

NAME
ssh-add -- adds private key identities to the authentication agent SYNOPSIS
ssh-add [-cDdkLlqXx] [-E fingerprint_hash] [-t life] [file ...] ssh-add -s pkcs11 ssh-add -e pkcs11 DESCRIPTION
ssh-add adds private key identities to the authentication agent, ssh-agent(1). When run without arguments, it adds the files ~/.ssh/id_rsa, ~/.ssh/id_dsa, ~/.ssh/id_ecdsa, and ~/.ssh/id_ed25519. After loading a private key, ssh-add will try to load corresponding certificate information from the filename obtained by appending -cert.pub to the name of the private key file. Alternative file names can be given on the command line. If any file requires a passphrase, ssh-add asks for the passphrase from the user. The passphrase is read from the user's tty. ssh-add retries the last passphrase if multiple identity files are given. The authentication agent must be running and the SSH_AUTH_SOCK environment variable must contain the name of its socket for ssh-add to work. The options are as follows: -c Indicates that added identities should be subject to confirmation before being used for authentication. Confirmation is performed by ssh-askpass(1). Successful confirmation is signaled by a zero exit status from ssh-askpass(1), rather than text entered into the requester. -D Deletes all identities from the agent. -d Instead of adding identities, removes identities from the agent. If ssh-add has been run without arguments, the keys for the default identities and their corresponding certificates will be removed. Otherwise, the argument list will be interpreted as a list of paths to public key files to specify keys and certificates to be removed from the agent. If no public key is found at a given path, ssh-add will append .pub and retry. -E fingerprint_hash Specifies the hash algorithm used when displaying key fingerprints. Valid options are: ``md5'' and ``sha256''. The default is ``sha256''. -e pkcs11 Remove keys provided by the PKCS#11 shared library pkcs11. -k When loading keys into or deleting keys from the agent, process plain private keys only and skip certificates. -L Lists public key parameters of all identities currently represented by the agent. -l Lists fingerprints of all identities currently represented by the agent. -q Be quiet after a successful operation. -s pkcs11 Add keys provided by the PKCS#11 shared library pkcs11. -t life Set a maximum lifetime when adding identities to an agent. The lifetime may be specified in seconds or in a time format specified in sshd_config(5). -X Unlock the agent. -x Lock the agent with a password. ENVIRONMENT
DISPLAY and SSH_ASKPASS If ssh-add needs a passphrase, it will read the passphrase from the current terminal if it was run from a terminal. If ssh-add does not have a terminal associated with it but DISPLAY and SSH_ASKPASS are set, it will execute the program specified by SSH_ASKPASS (by default ``ssh-askpass'') and open an X11 window to read the passphrase. This is particularly useful when calling ssh-add from a .xsession or related script. (Note that on some machines it may be necessary to redirect the input from /dev/null to make this work.) SSH_AUTH_SOCK Identifies the path of a UNIX-domain socket used to communicate with the agent. FILES
~/.ssh/id_dsa Contains the DSA authentication identity of the user. ~/.ssh/id_ecdsa Contains the ECDSA authentication identity of the user. ~/.ssh/id_ed25519 Contains the Ed25519 authentication identity of the user. ~/.ssh/id_rsa Contains the RSA authentication identity of the user. Identity files should not be readable by anyone but the user. Note that ssh-add ignores identity files if they are accessible by others. EXIT STATUS
Exit status is 0 on success, 1 if the specified command fails, and 2 if ssh-add is unable to contact the authentication agent. SEE ALSO
ssh(1), ssh-agent(1), ssh-askpass(1), ssh-keygen(1), sshd(8) AUTHORS
OpenSSH is a derivative of the original and free ssh 1.2.12 release by Tatu Ylonen. Aaron Campbell, Bob Beck, Markus Friedl, Niels Provos, Theo de Raadt and Dug Song removed many bugs, re-added newer features and created OpenSSH. Markus Friedl contributed the support for SSH protocol versions 1.5 and 2.0. BSD August 29, 2017 BSD

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