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px(1) [bsd man page]

PX(1)							      General Commands Manual							     PX(1)

NAME
px - Pascal interpreter SYNOPSIS
px [ obj [ argument ... ] ] DESCRIPTION
Px interprets the abstract machine code generated by pi. The first argument is the file to be interpreted, and defaults to obj; remaining arguments are available to the Pascal program using the built-ins argv and argc. Px is also invoked by pix when running `load and go'. If the program terminates abnormally an error message and a control flow backtrace are printed. The number of statements executed and total execution time are printed after normal termination. The p option of pi suppresses all of this except the message indicating the cause of abnormal termination. FILES
obj default object file pmon.out profile data file SEE ALSO
Berkeley Pascal User's Manual pi(1), pix(1) DIAGNOSTICS
Most run-time error messages are self-explanatory. Some of the more unusual ones are: Reference to an inactive file A file other than input or output was used before a call to reset or rewrite. Statement count limit exceeded The limit of 500,000 executed statements (which prevents excessive looping or recursion) has been exceeded. Bad data found on integer read Bad data found on real read Usually, non-numeric input was found for a number. For reals, Pascal requires digits before and after the decimal point so that num- bers like `.1' or `21.' evoke the second diagnostic. panic: Some message Indicates a internal inconsistency detected in px probably due to a Pascal system bug. Charles B. Haley, William N. Joy, and Ken Thompson BUGS
Calls to the procedures dispose and linelimit are ignored. Post-mortem traceback is not limited; infinite recursion leads to almost infinite traceback. Because interrupts sometimes find the system in the middle of a procedure or function entry or exit, the error backtrace on an interrupt is occasionally meaningless. The current line is, however, always correct; only the call backtrace and the name of the current routine may be lost. 3rd Berkeley Distribution PX(1)

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crt0_pa(3)						     Library Functions Manual							crt0_pa(3)

NAME
crt0_pa: crt0.o, gcrt0.o, mcrt0.o - execution startup routines for PA-RISC systems SYNOPSIS
Remarks PA-RISC 64-bit ELF uses only. This manpage describes on PA-RISC systems. For on Integrity systems, see crt0_ia(3). DESCRIPTION
PA-RISC 32-bit SOM The C, Pascal, and FORTRAN compilers link in the object files or to provide startup capabilities and environments for program execution. All are identical except that and provide additional functionality for gprof(1) and prof(1) profiling support respectively. The following symbols are defined in these object files: An array of character pointers to the environment in which the program will run. This array is terminated by a null pointer. A variable of type short containing the FPU model number returned by the FP status instruction. This variable is initialized with data from the kernel. A variable of type short containing the FPU revision number returned by the FP status instruction. This variable is initialized with data from the kernel. A variable of type int containing CPU specific information. This variable is initialized with data from the kernel. A variable of type int containing the CPU revision of the machine. This variable is initialized with data from the kernel. A variable of type int containing the system id value for an executable program. Execution start address. A secondary startup routine for C programs, called from which in turn calls This routine is contained in the C library rather than the file. For Pascal and FORTRAN programs, this symbol labels the beginning of the outer block (main program) and is generated by the compilers. The initial address of the program's data pointer. The startup code loads this address into general register 27. The beginning of the stack unwind table. The end of the stack unwind table. The beginning of the try/recover table. The end of the try/recover table. The file defines a null procedure for so programs compiled with profiling can be linked without profiling. The linker defines the following two symbols: The beginning address of the program's text area. The beginning address of the program's data area. PA-RISC 64-bit ELF The C, Pascal, and FORTRAN compilers link in the object file to provide startup capabilities and environments for program execution. It contains startup code that must be linked using to every PA-RISC 64-bit program. In a program, the object file is not used, and all actions normally associated with it are instead done by the dynamic loader dld.sl(5). Additional functionality for prof(1) and gprof(1) profiling support is no longer handled by In a PA-RISC 64-bit environment, processes initializers and terminators. Initializers are routines that are called before the program entry point and terminators are routines that are called when the program terminates via the routine. Initializers are invoked in reverse order of the link line so that dependent libraries are initialized before the libraries that depend on them. Terminators, on the other hand, are invoked in the forward order. Unlike the SOM version of for PA-RISC 64-bit ELF does not define any variables. It, however, sets the following global variables: A variable of type long containing the number of arguments. An array of character pointers to the arguments themselves. An array of character pointers to the environment in which the program will run. This array is terminated by a null pointer. A variable of type int containing CPU specific information. This variable is initialized with data from the kernel. A variable of type long containing the FPU model number returned by the FP status instruction. This variable is initialized with data from the kernel. A variable of type long containing the FPU revision number returned by the FP status instruction. This variable is initialized with data from the kernel. A variable of type long containing the CPU revision of the machine. This variable is initialized with data from the kernel. A variable of type long containing the system id value for an executable program. A variable of type long containing the requested thread local storage size. This variable is initialized with data from the ker- nel. A variable of type void * containing load information passed from the kernel. AUTHOR
The features described in this entry originated from AT&T UNIX System III. FILES
SEE ALSO
Profiling and Debugging Tools gprof(1) display call graph profile data monitor(3C) prepare execution profile prof(1) display profile data profil(2) execution time profile System Tools cc(1) invoke the HP-UX C compiler exec(2) execute a file f77(1) invoke the HP-UX FORTRAN compiler ld(1) invoke the link editor dld.sl(5) the PA-RISC dynamic loader pc(1) invoke the HP-UX Pascal compiler Miscellaneous end(3C) symbol of the last locations in program PA-RISC Systems Only crt0_pa(3)
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