Full Discussion: Physical Memory
Top Forums Programming Physical Memory Post 16348 by Alex_T on Thursday 28th of February 2002 07:34:59 AM
Ok
 
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MEM(4)							     Linux Programmer's Manual							    MEM(4)

NAME
mem, kmem, port - system memory, kernel memory and system ports DESCRIPTION
mem is a character device file that is an image of the main memory of the computer. It may be used, for example, to examine (and even patch) the system. Byte addresses in mem are interpreted as physical memory addresses. References to nonexistent locations cause errors to be returned. Examining and patching is likely to lead to unexpected results when read-only or write-only bits are present. It is typically created by: mknod -m 660 /dev/mem c 1 1 chown root:kmem /dev/mem The file kmem is the same as mem, except that the kernel virtual memory rather than physical memory is accessed. It is typically created by: mknod -m 640 /dev/kmem c 1 2 chown root:kmem /dev/kmem port is similar to mem, but the I/O ports are accessed. It is typically created by: mknod -m 660 /dev/port c 1 4 chown root:mem /dev/port FILES
/dev/mem /dev/kmem /dev/port SEE ALSO
chown(1), mknod(1), ioperm(2) COLOPHON
This page is part of release 3.53 of the Linux man-pages project. A description of the project, and information about reporting bugs, can be found at http://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/. Linux 1992-11-21 MEM(4)

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