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rdesktop(1) [redhat man page]

rdesktop(1)						      General Commands Manual						       rdesktop(1)

NAME
rdesktop - Remote Desktop Protocol client SYNOPSIS
rdesktop [options] server[:port] DESCRIPTION
rdesktop is a client for Microsoft Windows NT Terminal Server, Windows 2000 Terminal Services, Windows XP Remote Desktop, and possibly other Terminal Services products. rdesktop currently implements the RDP version 4 protocol. OPTIONS
-u <username> Username for authentication on the terminal server. -d <domain> Domain for authentication. -s <shell> Startup shell for the user - starts a specific application instead of Explorer. -c <directory> The initial working directory for the user. Often used in combination with -s to set up a fixed login environment. -p <password> The password to authenticate with. Note that this may have no effect if "Always prompt for password" is enabled on the server. WARNING: if you specify a password on the command line it may be visible to other users when they use tools like ps. Use -p - to make rdesktop request a password at startup (from standard input). -n <hostname> Client hostname. Normally rdesktop automatically obtains the hostname of the client. -k <layout> Keyboard layout to emulate. This requires a corresponding keymap file to be installed. The standard keymaps provided with rdesktop follow the RFC1766 naming scheme: a language code followed by a country code if necessary - e.g. en-us, en-gb, de, fr, sv, etc. The default is en-us (a US keyboard). -g <geometry> Desktop geometry (WxH). If geometry is the special word "workarea", the geometry will be fetched from the extended window manager hints property _NET_WORKAREA, from the root window. -f Enable fullscreen mode. This overrides the window manager and causes the rdesktop window to fully cover the current screen. Fullscreen mode can be toggled at any time using Ctrl-Alt-Enter. -b Force the server to send screen updates as bitmaps rather than using higher-level drawing operations. -e Disable encryption. This option is only needed (and will only work) if you have a French version of NT TSE. -m Do not send mouse motion events. This saves bandwidth, although some Windows applications may rely on receiving mouse motion. -C Use private colourmap. This will improve colour accuracy on an 8-bit display, but rdesktop will appear in false colour when not focused. -K Do not override window manager key bindings. By default rdesktop attempts to grab all keyboard input when it is in focus. -T <title> Window title. -D Hide window manager decorations, by using MWM hints. LINKS
Main website of rdesktop http://www.rdesktop.org/ October 2002 rdesktop(1)

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TERMINAL(1)							       Xfce							       TERMINAL(1)

NAME
Terminal - A Terminal emulator for X SYNOPSIS
Terminal [OPTION...] DESCRIPTION
Terminal is what is known as an X terminal emulator, often referred to as terminal or shell. It provides an equivalent to the old-fashioned text screen on your desktop, but one which can easily share the screen with other graphical applications. Windows users may already be familiar with the MS-DOS Prompt utility, which has the analogous function of offering a DOS command-line under Windows, though one should note that the UNIX CLI offer far more power and ease of use than does DOS. Terminal emulates the xterm application developed by the X Consortium. In turn, the xterm application emulates the DEC VT102 terminal and also supports the DEC VT220 escape sequences. An escape sequence is a series of characters that start with the Esc character. Terminal accepts all of the escape sequences that the VT102 and VT220 terminals use for functions such as to position the cursor and to clear the screen. OPTIONS
Option Summary Here is a summary of all the options, grouped by type. Explanations are in the following sections. General Options -h, --help; -V, --version; --disable-server; --default-display=display; --default-working-directory=directory Window or Tab Separators --tab; --window Tab Options -x, --execute; -e, --command=command; --working-directory=directory; -T, --title=title; -H, --hold Window Options --display=display; --geometry=geometry; --role=role; --startup-id=string; -I, --icon=icon; --fullscreen; --maximize; --show-menubar, --hide-menubar; --show-borders, --hide-borders; --show-toolbars, --hide-toolbars General Options -h, --help List the various command line options supported by Terminal and exit -V, --version Display version information and exit --disable-server Do not register with the D-BUS session message bus --default-display=display Default X display to use. --default-working-directory=directory Set directory as the default working directory for the terminal Window or Tab Separators --tab Open a new tab in the last-specified window; more than one of these options can be provided. --window Open a new window containing one tab; more than one of these options can be provided. Tab Options -x, --execute Execute the remainder of the command line inside the terminal -e, --command=command Execute command inside the terminal --working-directory=directory Set directory as the working directory for the terminal -T, --title=title Set title as the initial window title for the terminal -H, --hold Causes the terminal to be kept around after the child command has terminated Window Options --display=display X display to use for the last- specified window. --geometry=geometry Sets the geometry of the last-specified window to geometry. Read X(7) for more information on how to specify window geometries. --role=role Sets the window role of the last-specified window to role. Applies to only one window and can be specified once for each window you create from the command line. It is mostly used for session management inside Terminal --startup-id=string Specifies the startup notification id for the last-specified window. Used internally to forward the startup notification id when using the D-BUS service. -I, --icon=icon Set the terminal's icon as an icon name or filename. --fullscreen Set the last-specified window into fullscreen mode; applies to only one window; can be specified once for each window you create from the command line. --maximize Set the last-specified window into maximized mode; applies to only one window; can be specified once for each window you create from the command line. --show-menubar Turn on the menubar for the last-specified window. Can be specified once for each window you create from the command line. --hide-menubar Turn off the menubar for the last-specified window. Can be specified once for each window you create from the command line. --show-borders Turn on the window decorations for the last-specified window. Applies to only one window. Can be specified once for each window you create from the command line. --hide-borders Turn off the window decorations for the last-specified window. Applies to only one window. Can be specified once for each window you create from the command line. --show-toolbars Turn on the toolbars for the last-specified window. Applies to only one window. Can be specified once for each window you create from the command line. --hide-toolbars Turn off the toolbars for the last-specified window. Applies to only one window. Can be specified once for each window you create from the command line. EXAMPLES
Terminal --geometry 80x40 --command mutt --tab --command mc Opens a new terminal window with a geometry of 80 columns and 40 rows and two tabs in it, where the first tab runs mutt and the second tab runs mc. ENVIRONMENT
Terminal uses the Basedir Specification as defined on Freedesktop.org[1] to locate its data and configuration files. This means that file locations will be specified as a path relative to the directories described in the specification. ${XDG_CONFIG_HOME} The first base directory to look for configuration files. By default this is set to ~/.config/. ${XDG_CONFIG_DIRS} A colon separated list of base directories that contain configuration data. By default the application will look in ${sysconfdir}/xdg/. The value of ${sysconfdir} depends on how the program was build and will often be /etc/ for binary packages. ${XDG_DATA_HOME} The root for all user-specific data files. By default this is set to ~/.local/share/. ${XDG_DATA_DIRS} A set of preference ordered base directories relative to which data files should be searched in addition to the ${XDG_DATA_HOME} base directory. The directories should be separated with a colon. FILES
${XDG_CONFIG_DIRS}/Terminal/terminalrc This is the location of the configuration file that includes the preferences which control the look and feel of Terminal. ${XDG_DATA_DIRS}/Terminal/Terminal-toolbars.ui This file includes the user interface definition for the toolbars. If you customize the toolbars using the graphical toolbars editor, Terminal will store the new toolbars layout in the file ${XDG_DATA_HOME}/Terminal/Terminal-toolbars.ui. SEE ALSO
bash(1), X(7) AUTHORS
Nick Schermer <nick@xfce.org> Developer Benedikt Meurer <benny@xfce.org> Software developer, os-cillation, System development, Developer NOTES
1. Freedesktop.org http://freedesktop.org/ Terminal 0.4.4 02/01/2010 TERMINAL(1)

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