Linux and UNIX Man Pages

Test Your Knowledge in Computers #158
Difficulty: Easy
The migration of the ARPANET to TCP/IP was officially completed on January 1, 1983, when the new protocols were permanently activated.
True or False?
Linux & Unix Commands - Search Man Pages

sysconfigdb(8) [osf1 man page]

sysconfigdb(8)						      System Manager's Manual						    sysconfigdb(8)

NAME
sysconfigdb - Manage the subsystem configuration database SYNOPSIS
/sbin/sysconfigdb -s /sbin/sysconfigdb {-a | -u} [-t target] -f file subsystem-name /sbin/sysconfigdb {-m | -r} [-t target] -f file [subsystem-name] /sbin/sysconfigdb -d [-t target] subsystem-name /sbin/sysconfigdb -l [-t target] [subsystem-name,...] Specifies a subsystem that contains the attributes you want to modify. The subsystem name and attributes are in a stanza-formatted input file. You must specify only one subsystem name when deleting (-d), adding (-a), or replacing (-u) a subsystem. In other cases, when you do not specify a subsystem name the operation is attempted for all the subsystems and attributes specified in the input file. FLAGS
Adds the specified subsystem entry to the target file. Deletes the specified subsystem entry from the target file. Specifies the input file, a stanza-formatted file that contains entries for one or more subsystems. The default target file is the /etc/sysconfigtab file. Specify another target file by using the -t target flag. Lists the specified subsystem entries in the target file. If you do not specify subsystem-name,... arguments, all subsystem entries in the target file are listed. The /etc/sysconfigtab file is the default target file. Merges subsystem attributes specified in the input file with the subsystem attributes in the target file. If you do not specify a subsys- tem-name argument, all subsystem entries in the input file are merged. The /etc/sysconfigtab file is the default target file. Removes the subsystem entries specified in the input file from the target file. The only entries removed are those which have attribute names and val- ues that exactly match those in the input file. If you do not specify a subsystem-name argument, all subsystem entries in the input file with exactly-matching attributes are removed from the target file. The /etc/sysconfigtab file is the default target database file. Syn- chronizes the /etc/sysconfigtab file and the in-memory configuration database by updating the in-memory database so that it matches the /etc/sysconfigtab file. Specifies the target file for the operation. If you do not specify this flag, the default target file is the /etc/sysconfigtab file. Replaces a subsystem entry in the target file with the subsystem entry specified in the input file. DESCRIPTION
The sysconfigdb command is used to manage the /etc/sysconfigtab subsystem configuration database. However, it can also be used to maintain any text file that has the same format as the /etc/sysconfigtab file. The file being managed by the sysconfigdb command is called the tar- get file. By default, the target file is the /etc/sysconfigtab file. To specify another file as a target file, use the -t file flag. To modify a target file, create an input stanza-formatted file, as described in stanza(4). This stanza file contains the name of one or more subsystems, each with a list of attributes and their values. When the target file is the /etc/sysconfigtab file, modifications you make to it are automatically synchronized into the in-memory subsys- tem configuration database. However, the subsystems are unchanged until the next time they are configured. When the target file is another file, there is no synchronization with the in-memory subsystem configuration database. For example, suppose you create the following file named table_mgr.stanza that defines the attributes for a subsystem named table_mgr_1 and a subsystem named tbl_mgr_2: table_mgr_1: size = 10 name = Ten Element Table tbl_mgr_2: size = 5 name = Five Element Table To add the contents of this file to the /etc/sysconfigtab database and to have those modifications synchronized with the in-memory configu- ration database, enter the following commands: # sysconfigdb -a -f table_mgr.stanza table_mgr_1 # sysconfigdb -a -f table_mgr.stanaz tbl_mgr_2 The above example does not change the value of attributes in the running kernel. To modify the value of attributes in the run- ning kernel you must do one of the following: Use the sysconfig -r command Unconfigure and reconfigure the subsystem that contains the attribute value Reboot your system Always use the sysconfigdb command to modify the /etc/sysconfigtab database as it automatically updates the in-memory copy of the database. This ensures that the kernel has immediate access to any changes. The file is also automatically merged during an update installation and changes will be merged into the new system. To add the contents of the file table_mgr.stanza to another text file named /etc/sampleconfigdb, enter the following command: # sysconfigdb -a -t /etc/sampleconfigdb -f table_mgr.stanza Because the output file is not the /etc/sysconfigtab file, the in-memory configuration data- base is not updated. RESTRICTIONS
You must be the root user to execute the commmand when the /etc/sysconfigtab file is the target file and the operation will modify it. EXAMPLES
The following list shows examples of using the sysconfigdb command: To replace an existing entry in the /etc/sysconfigtab file, use the -u flag: # sysconfigdb -u -f table_mgr.stanza table_mgr_1 The above command replaces the table_mgr_1 entry in the /etc/sysconfigtab file with the information in the table_mgr.stanza file for the table_mgr_1 subsystem. The command updates the in-memory copy of the subsystem configuration database to match the modified /etc/sysconfigtab file. To merge information in a stanza-formatted file with the /etc/sysconfigtab file, use the -m flag: # sysconfigdb -m -f table_mgr.stanza tbl_mgr_2 The above command merges the tbl_mgr_2 information from the table_mgr.stanza file with the information already in the tbl_mgr_2 entry in the /etc/sysconfigtab file. The command updates the in-memory copy of the subsystem configuration database to match the modified /etc/sysconfigtab file. To list the entry for a subsystem in the /etc/sysconfigtab file, use the -l flag: # sysconfigdb -l table_mgr_1 table_mgr_1: size = 10 name = Ten Element Table The above command does not update the in-memory copy of the subsystem configuration database. To delete the entry for a subsystem from the /etc/sysconfigtab file, use the -d flag: # sysconfigdb -d table_mgr_1 The above command deletes the table_mgr_1 entry from the /etc/sysconfigtab file and updates the in-mem- ory copy of the subsystem configuration database to match the modified /etc/sysconfigtab file. FILES
The subsystem configuration database RELATED INFORMATION
Commands: cfgmgr(8) sysconfig(8) Files: sysconfigtab(4), stanza(4) delim off sysconfigdb(8)

Featured Tech Videos