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groupadd(8) [osf1 man page]

groupadd(8)						      System Manager's Manual						       groupadd(8)

NAME
groupadd - Adds a new group definition SYNOPSIS
/usr/sbin/groupadd [-g gid [-o]] [-P] [-x extended_option] group_name OPTIONS
Specifies the group identifier (GID) of the new group being added. The GID must be a non-negative decimal integer. Allows a group identi- fication (GID) number to be duplicated (non-unique). This option can be used only with the -g option. Creates a PC group only. The fol- lowing extended_option attributes are available. The PC attributes will only be applicable if the Advanced Server for UNIX (ASU) is config- ured. The extended_option attributes can be specified as a space-delimited list after a single -x option. Indicates that the group is distributed. The value of the distributed=n attribute can be 0 or 1. If set to 0, the group is added to the local system. If set to 1, the group is added to the NIS master database on the running system. When this attribute is set, the local attribute is automatically set to the opposite value. Indicates that the group is local. The value of the local=n attribute can be 0 or 1. If set to 1, the group is added to the local database. If set to 0, the group information is added to the NIS master database. When this attribute is set, the distributed attribute is automatically set to the opposite value. A comma-delimited list of members that will be added to the UNIX user's group. You can specify the user (login) name or the account UID. Specifies a text string that provides a description of the PC group. Specifies a comma delimited list of PC users to be added to the current list of members of a PC group. Note that this adds, but does not replace mem- bers. Specifies the name of the new group. The group name can be any printable characters, with the exception of the colon (:) and new- line ( ) characters. DESCRIPTION
The groupadd command is part of a set of command-line interfaces (CLI) that are used to create and administer user groups on the system. When the Advanced Server for UNIX (ASU) is installed and running, the groupadd command can also be used to administer PC groups for users who are also holders of Windows NT domain accounts. Accounts can also be created with the /usr/bin/X11/dxaccounts graphical user interface (GUI), although the extended options are only available from the CLI utilities such as useradd and groupmod. Different options are available depending on how the local system is configured: In the default UNIX environment, user account management is compliant with the IEEE POSIX Draft P13873.3 standard. The CLI is backwards-compatible, so all existing local scripts will function. However, you should consider testing your account management scripts before use. The groupadd command lets the system administrator create new groups on the system, by specifying the group name and GID. When the GID is not specified (with the -g option), the GID defaults to the next available (unique) number. The -x option lets the system administrator specify whether the new group is local or distributed over a network. If this option is not specified on the command line, the system adds the new group to the appropriate database as specified by the system defaults. The default behavior on the system for the groupadd command is distributed=0 and local=1. With these values, the system adds the group to the local database by default. Setting the distributed= and local= attributes to the same value (for example, distributed=0 and local=0) produces an error. You must have superuser privilege to execute this command. RESTRICTIONS
You cannot specify more than 255 characters on a single command line. However, lines can be split to an appropriate length. If you try and enter too many new groups, the group file may be corrupted. The pc_synchronize default value is not used for groupadd, groupmod, and groupdel. UNIX and PC groups cannot be synchronized and therefore must be created separately. Use the command groupadd -P xdomain to create a PC group named xdomain. Then, use the command groupadd xdomain to create a UNIX group named xdomain. EXIT STATUS
The groupadd command exits with one of the following values: Success. Failure. Warning. EXAMPLES
The following example adds the group, newgroup, to the group database with a system-provided GID: % groupadd newgroup The following example adds the group, newgroup, to the group database with a GID of 451: % groupadd -g 451 newgroup The following example adds the group, new- group, to the NIS master database % groupadd -x distributed=1 newgroup The following example adds the PC group, projectX with members JoeMc and HiteshC: % groupadd -x members=JoeMc,HiteshC, projectX The following example adds the PC group, newgroup and provides a description field "common project group": % groupadd -P -x pc_group_description="common project group" projectX FILES
The groupadd command operates on files for the specific level of system security. SEE ALSO
Commands: groupdel(8), groupmod(8), useradd(8), userdel(8), usermod(8) System Administration Security Advanced Server for UNIX administration and configuration documents. groupadd(8)

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