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OpenSolaris 2009.06 - man page for onintr (opensolaris section 1)

trap(1) 				  User Commands 				  trap(1)

NAME
       trap, onintr - shell built-in functions to respond to (hardware) signals

SYNOPSIS
   sh
       trap [argument n [n2]...]

   csh
       onintr [-| label]

   ksh
       *trap [arg sig [sig2...]]

   ksh93
       +trap [-p] [action condition...]

DESCRIPTION
   sh
       The  trap  command  argument is to be read and executed when the shell receives numeric or
       symbolic signal(s) (n). (Note: argument is scanned once when the trap is set and once when
       the  trap is taken.) Trap commands are executed in order of signal number or corresponding
       symbolic names. Any attempt to set a trap on a signal that was ignored  on  entry  to  the
       current	shell  is ineffective. An attempt to trap on signal 11 (memory fault) produces an
       error. If argument is absent all trap(s) n are reset to their original values. If argument
       is  the null string this signal is ignored by the shell and by the commands it invokes. If
       n is 0 the command argument is executed on exit from the shell. The trap command  with  no
       arguments prints a list of commands associated with each signal number.

   csh
       onintr  controls the action of the shell on interrupts. With no arguments, onintr restores
       the default action of the shell on interrupts. (The shell  terminates  shell  scripts  and
       returns	to  the terminal command input level). With the - argument, the shell ignores all
       interrupts. With a label argument, the shell executes a goto label when	an  interrupt  is
       received or a child process terminates because it was interrupted.

   ksh
       trap  uses arg as a command to be read and executed when the shell receives signal(s) sig.
       arg is scanned once when the trap is set and once when the trap is taken. Each sig can  be
       specified as a number or as the name of the signal. trap commands are executed in order of
       signal number. Any attempt to set a trap on a signal that was ignored on entry to the cur-
       rent  shell  is	ineffective. If arg is omitted or is -, then the trap(s) for each sig are
       reset to their original values. If arg is the null (the empty  string,  for  example,  "")
       string  then this signal is ignored by the shell and by the commands it invokes. If sig is
       ERR then arg are executed whenever a command has a non-zero exit status. If sig	is  DEBUG
       then  arg  are executed after each command. If sig is 0 or EXIT for a trap set outside any
       function then the command arg is executed on exit from the shell. The trap command with no
       arguments prints a list of commands associated with each signal number.

       On  this  manual  page,	ksh(1) commands that are preceded by one or two * (asterisks) are
       treated specially in the following ways:

	   1.	  Variable assignment lists preceding the command remain in effect when the  com-
		  mand completes.

	   2.	  I/O redirections are processed after variable assignments.

	   3.	  Errors cause a script that contains them to abort.

	   4.	  Words,  following a command preceded by ** that are in the format of a variable
		  assignment, are expanded with the same rules as  a  variable	assignment.  This
		  means  that tilde substitution is performed after the = sign and word splitting
		  and file name generation are not performed.

   ksh93
       trap is a special built-in that defines actions	to  be	taken  when  conditions  such  as
       receiving  a  signal  occur. trap can also be used to display the current trap settings on
       standard output.

       If action is -, trap resets each condition to the default value. If  action  is	an  empty
       string,	the  shell  ignores each of the conditions if they arise. Otherwise, the argument
       action is read and executed by the shell as if it were processed by eval when one  of  the
       corresponding conditions arise. The action of the trap overrides any previous action asso-
       ciated with each specified condition. The value of $? is not altered by	the  trap  execu-
       tion.

       condition can be the name or number of a signal, or one of the following:

       EXIT	Execute  this  trap  when  the shell exits. If defined within a function with the
		function reserved word, executes the trap in the caller's  environment	when  the
		function  returns. The trap action is restored to the value it had when it called
		the function.

       0	Same as EXIT.

       DEBUG	Execute before each simple command  is	executed  but  after  the  arguments  are
		expanded.

       ERR	Execute whenever set -e would cause the shell to exit.

       KEYBD	Execute when a key is entered from a terminal device.

       Signal  names  are  case  insensitive  and  the	sig prefix is optional. Signals that were
       ignored on entry to a non-interactive shell cannot trapped or reset although doing so does
       not  report  an	error. The use of signal numbers other than 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 14, and 15 are
       not portable.

       Although trap is a special built-in, specifying a condition that the shell does	not  know
       about causes trap to exit with a non-zero exit status, but does not terminate the invoking
       shell.

       If no action or conditions are specified then all the current trap settings are written to
       standard output.

       The following options are supported by the trap built-in command in ksh93:

       -p    Causes  the current traps to be output in a format that can be processed as input to
	     the shell to recreate the current traps.

       The trap built-in in ksh93 exits with one of the following values:

       0     Successful completion.

       >0    An error occurred.

       On this manual page, ksh93(1) commands that are preceded by one or two + (plus signs)  are
       treated specially in the following ways:

	   1.	  Variable  assignment lists preceding the command remain in effect when the com-
		  mand completes.

	   2.	  I/O redirections are processed after variable assignments.

	   3.	  Errors cause a script that contains them to abort.

	   4.	  They are not valid function names.

	   5.	  Words, following a command preceded by ++ that are in the format of a  variable
		  assignment,  are  expanded  with  the same rules as a variable assignment. This
		  means that tilde substitution is performed after the = sign and word	splitting
		  and file name generation are not performed.

ATTRIBUTES
       See attributes(5) for descriptions of the following attributes:

       +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+
       |      ATTRIBUTE TYPE	     |	    ATTRIBUTE VALUE	   |
       +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+
       |Availability		     |SUNWcsu			   |
       +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+

SEE ALSO
       csh(1), eval(1), exit(1), ksh(1), ksh93(1), sh(1), attributes(5)

SunOS 5.11				   20 Nov 2007					  trap(1)


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