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getbsize(3) [netbsd man page]

GETBSIZE(3)						   BSD Library Functions Manual 					       GETBSIZE(3)

NAME
getbsize -- get user block size LIBRARY
Standard C Library (libc, -lc) SYNOPSIS
#include <stdlib.h> char * getbsize(int *headerlenp, long *blocksizep); DESCRIPTION
The getbsize function determines the user's preferred block size based on the value of the ``BLOCKSIZE'' environment variable; see environ(7) for details on its use and format. The getbsize function returns a pointer to a NUL terminated string describing the block size, something like ``1K-blocks''. If the headerlenp parameter is not NULL the memory referenced by headerlenp is filled in with the length of the string (not including the terminat- ing NUL). If the blocksizep parameter is not NULL the memory referenced by blocksizep is filled in with block size, in bytes. If the user's block size is unreasonable, a warning message is written to standard error and the returned information reflects a block size of 512 bytes. SEE ALSO
df(1), du(1), ls(1), systat(1), environ(7) HISTORY
The getbsize function first appeared in 4.4BSD. BSD
May 30, 2003 BSD

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GETBSIZE(3)						   BSD Library Functions Manual 					       GETBSIZE(3)

NAME
getbsize -- get preferred block size LIBRARY
Standard C Library (libc, -lc) SYNOPSIS
#include <stdlib.h> char * getbsize(int *headerlenp, long *blocksizep); DESCRIPTION
The getbsize() function returns a preferred block size for reporting by system utilities df(1), du(1), ls(1) and systat(1), based on the value of the BLOCKSIZE environment variable. BLOCKSIZE may be specified directly in bytes, or in multiples of a kilobyte by specifying a number followed by ``K'' or ``k'', in multiples of a megabyte by specifying a number followed by ``M'' or ``m'' or in multiples of a gigabyte by specifying a number followed by ``G'' or ``g''. Multiples must be integers. Valid values of BLOCKSIZE are 512 bytes to 1 gigabyte. Sizes less than 512 bytes are rounded up to 512 bytes, and sizes greater than 1 GB are rounded down to 1 GB. In each case getbsize() produces a warning message. The getbsize() function returns a pointer to a null-terminated string describing the block size, something like ``1K-blocks''. The memory referenced by headerlenp is filled in with the length of the string (not including the terminating null). The memory referenced by blocksizep is filled in with block size, in bytes. SEE ALSO
df(1), du(1), ls(1), systat(1), environ(7) HISTORY
The getbsize() function first appeared in 4.4BSD. BSD
November 16, 2012 BSD
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