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ipresend(1) [netbsd man page]

IPRESEND(1)						      General Commands Manual						       IPRESEND(1)

NAME
ipresend - resend IP packets out to network SYNOPSIS
ipresend [ -EHPRSTX ] [ -d <device> ] [ -g <gateway> ] [ -m <MTU> ] [ -r <filename> ] DESCRIPTION
ipresend was designed to allow packets to be resent, once captured, back out onto the network for use in testing. ipresend supports a num- ber of different file formats as input, including saved snoop/tcpdump binary data. OPTIONS
-d <interface> Set the interface name to be the name supplied. This is useful with the -P, -S, -T and -E options, where it is not otherwise possi- ble to associate a packet with an interface. Normal "text packets" can override this setting. -g <gateway> Specify the hostname of the gateway through which to route packets. This is required whenever the destination host isn't directly attached to the same network as the host from which you're sending. -m <MTU> Specify the MTU to be used when sending out packets. This option allows you to set a fake MTU, allowing the simulation of network interfaces with small MTU's without setting them so. -r <filename> Specify the filename from which to take input. Default is stdin. -E The input file is to be text output from etherfind. The text formats which are currently supported are those which result from the following etherfind option combinations: etherfind -n etherfind -n -t -H The input file is to be hex digits, representing the binary makeup of the packet. No length correction is made, if an incorrect length is put in the IP header. -P The input file specified by -i is a binary file produced using libpcap (i.e., tcpdump version 3). Packets are read from this file as being input (for rule purposes). -R When sending packets out, send them out "raw" (the way they came in). The only real significance here is that it will expect the link layer (i.e. ethernet) headers to be prepended to the IP packet being output. -S The input file is to be in "snoop" format (see RFC 1761). Packets are read from this file and used as input from any interface. This is perhaps the most useful input type, currently. -T The input file is to be text output from tcpdump. The text formats which are currently supported are those which result from the following tcpdump option combinations: tcpdump -n tcpdump -nq tcpdump -nqt tcpdump -nqtt tcpdump -nqte -X The input file is composed of text descriptions of IP packets. SEE ALSO
ipftest(1), ipsend(1), iptest(1), bpf(4), ipsend(5), tcpdump(8) DIAGNOSTICS
Needs to be run as root. BUGS
Not all of the input formats are sufficiently capable of introducing a wide enough variety of packets for them to be all useful in testing. If you find any, please send email to me at darrenr@pobox.com IPRESEND(1)

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MERGECAP(1)						  The Wireshark Network Analyzer					       MERGECAP(1)

NAME
mergecap - Merges two or more capture files into one SYNOPSIS
mergecap [ -a ] [ -F <file format> ] [ -h ] [ -s <snaplen> ] [ -T <encapsulation type> ] [ -v ] -w <outfile>|- <infile> ... DESCRIPTION
Mergecap is a program that combines multiple saved capture files into a single output file specified by the -w argument. Mergecap knows how to read libpcap capture files, including those of tcpdump, Wireshark, and other tools that write captures in that format. By default, Mergecap writes the capture file in libpcap format, and writes all of the packets from the input capture files to the output file. Mergecap is able to detect, read and write the same capture files that are supported by Wireshark. The input files don't need a specific filename extension; the file format and an optional gzip compression will be automatically detected. Near the beginning of the DESCRIPTION section of wireshark(1) or http://www.wireshark.org/docs/man-pages/wireshark.html <http://www.wireshark.org/docs/man-pages/wireshark.html> is a detailed description of the way Wireshark handles this, which is the same way Mergecap handles this. Mergecap can write the file in several output formats. The -F flag can be used to specify the format in which to write the capture file, mergecap -F provides a list of the available output formats. Packets from the input files are merged in chronological order based on each frame's timestamp, unless the -a flag is specified. Mergecap assumes that frames within a single capture file are already stored in chronological order. When the -a flag is specified, packets are copied directly from each input file to the output file, independent of each frame's timestamp. The output file frame encapsulation type is set to the type of the input files if all input files have the same type. If not all of the input files have the same frame encapsulation type, the output file type is set to WTAP_ENCAP_PER_PACKET. Note that some capture file formats, most notably libpcap, do not currently support WTAP_ENCAP_PER_PACKET. This combination will cause the output file creation to fail. OPTIONS
-a Causes the frame timestamps to be ignored, writing all packets from the first input file followed by all packets from the second input file. By default, when -a is not specified, the contents of the input files are merged in chronological order based on each frame's timestamp. Note: when merging, mergecap assumes that packets within a capture file are already in chronological order. -F <file format> Sets the file format of the output capture file. Mergecap can write the file in several formats; mergecap -F provides a list of the available output formats. The default is to use the file format of the first input file. -h Prints the version and options and exits. -s <snaplen> Sets the snapshot length to use when writing the data. If the -s flag is used to specify a snapshot length, frames in the input file with more captured data than the specified snapshot length will have only the amount of data specified by the snapshot length written to the output file. This may be useful if the program that is to read the output file cannot handle packets larger than a certain size (for example, the versions of snoop in Solaris 2.5.1 and Solaris 2.6 appear to reject Ethernet frames larger than the standard Ethernet MTU, making them incapable of handling gigabit Ethernet captures if jumbo frames were used). -v Causes mergecap to print a number of messages while it's working. -w <outfile>|- Sets the output filename. If the name is '-', stdout will be used. This setting is mandatory. -T <encapsulation type> Sets the packet encapsulation type of the output capture file. If the -T flag is used to specify a frame encapsulation type, the encapsulation type of the output capture file will be forced to the specified type, rather than being the type appropriate to the encapsulation type of the input capture files. Note that this merely forces the encapsulation type of the output file to be the specified type; the packet headers of the packets will not be translated from the encapsulation type of the input capture file to the specified encapsulation type (for example, it will not translate an Ethernet capture to an FDDI capture if an Ethernet capture is read and '-T fddi' is specified). SEE ALSO
tcpdump(8), pcap(3), wireshark(1), tshark(1), dumpcap(1), editcap(1), text2pcap(1) NOTES
Mergecap is based heavily upon editcap by Richard Sharpe <sharpe[AT]ns.aus.com> and Guy Harris <guy[AT]alum.mit.edu>. Mergecap is part of the Wireshark distribution. The latest version of Wireshark can be found at <http://www.wireshark.org>. HTML versions of the Wireshark project man pages are available at: http://www.wireshark.org/docs/man-pages <http://www.wireshark.org/docs/man-pages>. AUTHORS
Original Author -------- ------ Scott Renfro <scott[AT]renfro.org> Contributors ------------ Bill Guyton <guyton[AT]bguyton.com> 1.2.8 2010-05-05 MERGECAP(1)
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