Visit Our UNIX and Linux User Community

Linux and UNIX Man Pages

Test Your Knowledge in Computers #443
Difficulty: Easy
FHM, a men's lifestyle magazine, asked 1,344 women if they preferred to hang out with a computer science expert or a footballer, and 1,023 (76.116%) stated they preferred geeks over athletes.
True or False?
Linux & Unix Commands - Search Man Pages

link(2) [hpux man page]

link(2) 							System Calls Manual							   link(2)

NAME
link() - link to a file SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
The system call creates a new link (directory entry) for the existing file. path1 points to a path name naming an existing file. path2 points to a path name naming the new directory entry to be created. RETURN VALUE
Upon successful completion, returns zero. Otherwise, it returns -1 and sets (see errno(2)) to indicate the error. ERRORS
The system call fails and no link is created if one or more of the following is true: A component of either path prefix denies search permission. The requested link requires writing in a directory that does not permit writing. The user's or group's disk quota block limit has been reached for this file system. The link named by path2 exists. path points outside the allocated address space of the process. The reliable detection of this error is implementation dependent. Too many symbolic links were encountered in translating either path name. The maximum number of links to a file would be exceeded. Either the specified path exceeds bytes, or a component of either specified path exceeds while is in effect. The file named by path1 does not exist. A component of either path prefix does not exist. path2 points to a null path name. path1 or path2 is null. The directory to contain the file cannot be extended. A component of either path prefix is not a directory. The file named by path1 is a directory and the effective user ID is not a user who has appropriate privileges. Some file systems return this error whenever path1 names a directory, regardless of the user ID. The requested link requires writing in a directory on a read-only file system. The link named by path2 and the file named by path1 are on different logical devices (file systems). SEE ALSO
cp(1), link(1M), symlink(2), unlink(2), symlink(4), privileges(5). STANDARDS CONFORMANCE
link(2)

Check Out this Related Man Page

symlink(2)							System Calls Manual							symlink(2)

NAME
symlink - make symbolic link to a file SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
The function creates a symbolic link. Its name is the pathname pointed to by path2, which must be a pathname that does not name an existing file or symbolic link. The contents of the symbolic link are the string pointed to by path1. RETURN VALUE
Upon successful completion, returns 0. Otherwise, it returns -1 and sets to indicate the error. ERRORS
If fails, is set to one of the following values: [EACCES] Write permission is denied in the directory where the symbolic link is being created, or search permission is denied for a component of the path prefix of path2. [EEXIST] The path2 argument names an existing file or symbolic link. [EFAULT] path1 or path2 points outside the process's allocated address space. The reliable detection of this error is implementation-dependent. [EIO] An I/O error occurred while reading from path1, making the directory entry for path2, allocating the inode for path2, or writing out the link contents of path2. [ELOOP] Too many symbolic links were encountered in resolving path2. [ENAMETOOLONG] The length of the path2 argument exceeds or pathname resolution of a symbolic link produced an intermediate result that exceeds or a pathname component is longer than [ENOENT] A component of path2 does not name an existing file or path2 is an empty string. [ENOSPC] The directory in which the entry for the new symbolic link is being placed cannot be extended because no space is left on the file system containing the directory, or the new symbolic link cannot be created because no space is left on the file system which will contain the link, or the file system is out of file- allocation resources. [ENOTDIR] A component of the path prefix of path2 is not a directory. [EROFS] The new symbolic link would reside on a read-only file system. APPLICATION USAGE
Like a hard link, a symbolic link allows a file to have multiple logical names. The presence of a hard link guarantees the existence of a file, even after the original name has been removed. A symbolic link provides no such assurance; in fact, the file named by the path1 argu- ment need not exist when the link is created. A symbolic link can cross file system boundaries. Normal permission checks are made on each component of the symbolic link pathname during its resolution. AUTHOR
was developed by the University of California, Berkeley. SEE ALSO
cp(1), chown(2), link(2), lstat(2), open(2), readlink(2), unlink(2), symlink(4), <unistd.h>. STANDARDS CONFORMANCE
CHANGE HISTORY
First released in Issue 4, Version 2. symlink(2)

Featured Tech Videos