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bind2csv2(1) [debian man page]

BIND2CSV2(1)							 MaraDNS reference						      BIND2CSV2(1)

NAME
bind2csv2 - convert zone files from BIND to MaraDNS compatible format DESCRPTION
MaraDNS 1.3 has BIND zone file support. This means it is possible to use BIND zone files in MaraDNS. This makes it easier for people to use MaraDNS in mixed DNS server environments. Instead of having direct BIND zone file support, MaraDNS has a script, called bind2csv2, that converts BIND zone files in to the "csv2" zone file format that MaraDNS 1.2 and 1.3 use. The zone files generated by bind2csv2 are not MaraDNS 1.2 compatible; MaraDNS 1.3 is needed to read zone files generated by bind2csv2. bind2csv2 is a Python script, written in version 2.2.3 of the Python interpreter. The script should be compatible with more recent versions of Python. The script assumes Python is the file /usr/bin/python on your system; if Python is located elsewhere on your system, please change the first line of bind2csv2. Naturally, you will need the Python interpreter installed on your system to use bind2csv2. This is a well-known open source language supported by most modern Linux and BSD distributions. USAGE
To use the script, enter a directory containing BIND zone files, and invoke the script thusly: bind2csv2 -c zone1 zone2 zone3 Substitute "zone1", "zone2", and "zone3" with a list of one or more BIND zone files you wish be converted in to MaraDNS 1.3 csv2 zone files. Once the script is run, you should have files with names like "zone1.csv2", "zone2.csv2", and "zone3.csv2". These files are csv2 zone files that MaraDNS will be able to parse. Copy these csv2 zone files to a place where MaraDNS can find the zone files. Should there already be a "zone1.csv2" file when bind2csv2 is run, the "zone1.csv2" file will be replaced. OPTIONS
None. Bind2csv2 can only be used as above. BUGS
bind2csv2 is not a perfect zone file converter. In particular, bind2csv2 does not act like BIND when NS records have different TTLs. Please make sure all NS records in your BIND zone files have the same TTL. In addition, bind2csv2 also does not support all resource record types that BIND supports. Only the following RRs are supported by bind2csv2: A AAAA AFSDB CNAME GPOS HINFO ISDN LOC MB MD MF MG MINFO MR MX NS NSAP PTR PX RP RT SOA SPF SRV TXT WKS X25 MARADNS
September 2007 BIND2CSV2(1)

Check Out this Related Man Page

CSV1(5) 							 MaraDNS reference							   CSV1(5)

NAME
csv1 - Format of the csv1 zone file that MaraDNS uses SPECIAL NOTE
The csv1 zone file format is supported primarily for MaraDNS users who already have zone files in the csv1 format. MaraDNS now supports a csv2 zone file format. Note that the csv1 zone file format will continue to function as long as I am MaraDNS' maintainer. SPECIAL CHARACTERS
| This delimits fields # This signifies a comment. Lines starting with this are ignored, otherwise it has no significance % This, in domain names, signifies that the rest of the domain name should be the name of this zone * This is translated to mean "any host name that otherwise does not resolve". It must be at the beginning of a domain name. This is used as an escape character, either to escape octal values such as '45' for %, or to escape the '%' character so it has no special meaning, or to escape the backslash character. NOTES ON PROCESSING
All domain-name labels are converted to their lower-case equivalents before processing is done. This is because domain-name literals in the database with one or more upper-case letters in them are case-sensitive. This is my way to resolve RFC1035 schizophrenic desire to both allow binary domain labels, and its desire to be case-insensitive. The file must first have a SOA record, followed by one or more NS records, followed by other records. The initial NS and SOA records must be RR for this zone. NS records after any non-NS record must be part of another zone. The resolution algorithm will not break if non-CNAME records share records with a CNAME record, but this is not a good idea to do. RR FORMAT
A domain name is a one-letter designation of its type, followed by the domain name separated by dots, ending with either a % or a trailing dot. If the domain name does not end with a % or trailing dot, an error is returned. SUPPORTED RR TYPES
MaraDNS only supports the following types of resource records (RRs) in csv1 files. More resource records types are supported in csv2 zone files; see csv2(5) for details. Letter Type RFC1035 section 3.2.2 value A A 1 N NS 2 C CNAME 5 S SOA 6 P PTR 12 @ MX 15 T TXT 16 U any determined in third field of line FORMAT OF SUPPORTED RR TYPES
Here are the formats, shown by letter name: A: Has three fields field one: the domain name field two: the ttl for the name in seconds field three: the ip address, in dotted decimal notation Example: Ahost.example.com.|7200|10.1.2.3 A records are described with grueling detail in RFC1035. In short, an A record is an IP address for a given host name. N: Has three fields field one: the domain name of the record field two: the ttl for the name in seconds field three: the domain name this NS points to. Example: Nexample.com.|86400|ns.example.com. NS (N here) records are described in RFC1035 C: Has three fields field one: the domain name of the record field two: the ttl for the name in seconds field three: the domain this CNAME record points to Example: Calias.example.org.|3200|realname.example.org. CNAME (which C is short for) records are described in RFC1035 S: Has nine fields field one: the domain name of the record field two: the TTL of the record field three: the origin of the domain. In other words, the name of the primary name server for the domain. field four: the email address for this domain (in the RFC822, not BIND format) field five: the serial for the domain field six: the refresh (how often to see updates) for the domain field seven: the retry (how often to try when down) for the domain field eight: the expire (how long before the slave gives up) for the domain field nine: the minimum (and default) TTL for the domain Example: Sexample.net.|86400|%|hostmaster@%|19771108|7200|3600|604800|1800 SOA (S here) records are described in RFC1035 P: has three fields field one: the IP we wish to point to (in in-addr.arpa form) field two: the ttl for the name in seconds field three: the FQDN for the IP in question Example: P3.2.1.10.in-addr.arpa.|86400|ns.example.com. PTR (P here) records, which are used for reverse DNS lookups, are described in RFC1035. Note that one needs control of the appropriate in- addr.arpa subdomain to make PTR records visible on the internet at large. @: has four fields field one: The host that people send email to field two: the ttl for this record field three: The preference for this MX host field four: The name of this MX host Example: @example.com.|86400|10|mail.example.com. MX (@ here) records are described in RFC1035 T: has three fields field one: The host someone wants to get additional information about field two: the ttl for this record field three: The desired text. Any data becomes the record up until a new line is reached. The new line is not part of the TXT record Example: Texample.com.|86400|Example.com: Buy example products online TXT (T here) records are described in RFC1035 U: has four fields field one: The host someone wants a data type normally unsupported by MaraDNS for field two: the ttl for this record field three: The numeric code for this data type (33 for SRV, etc.) field four: The raw binary data for this data type Example: Uexample.com.|3600|40|100102Kitchen sink data The above example is a "Kitchen Sink" RR (see draft-ietf-dnsind-kitchen-sink-02.txt) with a "meaning" of 8, a "coding" of 1, a "subcoding" of 2, and a data string of "Kitchen sink data". Since this particular data type is not formalized in a RFC at this time, the most appropriate method of storing this data is by using the catch-all "unsupported" syntax. EXAMPLE CSV1 ZONE FILE # Example CSV1 zone file # This is what is known as a SOA record. All zone files need to have one # of these S%|86400|%|hostmaster@%|19771108|7200|3600|604800|1800 # These are known as authoritative NS records. All zone files need # one or more of these N%|86400|ns1.% N%|86400|ns2.% # Some IP addresses Ans1.%|86400|10.0.0.1 Ans2.%|86400|192.168.0.1 A%|86400|10.1.2.3 Amx.%|86400|10.1.2.4 # An 'IN MX' record @%|86400|10|mx.% LEGAL DISCLAIMER
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE AUTHORS ''AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE. AUTHOR
Sam Trenholme http://www.samiam.org/ MARADNS
January 2002 CSV1(5)

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