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security_disable(3) [centos man page]

security_disable(3)					     SELinux API documentation					       security_disable(3)

NAME
security_disable - disable the SELinux kernel code at runtime SYNOPSIS
#include <selinux/selinux.h> int security_disable(void); DESCRIPTION
security_disable() disables the SELinux kernel code, unregisters selinuxfs from /proc/filesystems, and then unmounts /selinux. This function can only be called at runtime and prior to the initial policy load. After the initial policy load, the SELinux kernel code cannot be disabled, but only placed in "permissive" mode by using security_setenforce(3). RETURN VALUE
security_disable() returns zero on success or -1 on error. AUTHOR
This manual page has been written by Guido Trentalancia <guido@trentalancia.com> SEE ALSO
selinux(8), setenforce (8) 21 Nov 2009 security_disable(3)

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sestatus(8)						SELinux command line documentation					       sestatus(8)

NAME
sestatus - SELinux status tool SYNOPSIS
sestatus [-v] [-b] This tool is used to get the status of a system running SELinux. DESCRIPTION
This manual page describes the sestatus program. This tool is used to get the status of a system running SELinux. It displays data about whether SELinux is enabled or disabled, location of key directories, and the loaded policy with its status as shown in the example: > sestatus SELinux status: enabled SELinuxfs mount: /selinux SELinux root directory: /etc/selinux Loaded policy name: targeted Current mode: permissive Mode from config file: enforcing Policy MLS status: enabled Policy deny_unknown status: allow Max kernel policy version: 26 sestatus can also be used to display: - The security context of files and processes listed in the /etc/sestatus.conf file. The format of this file is described in ses- tatus.conf(5). - The status of booleans. OPTIONS
-v Displays the contexts of files and processes listed in the /etc/sestatus.conf file. It also checks whether the file is a symbolic link, if so then the context of the target file is also shown. The following contexts will always be displayed: The current process context The init process context The controlling terminal file context -b Display the current state of booleans. FILES
/etc/sestatus.conf AUTHOR
This man page was written by Daniel Walsh <dwalsh@redhat.com>. The program was written by Chris PeBenito <pebenito@gentoo.org> SEE ALSO
selinux(8), sestatus.conf(5) Security Enhanced Linux 26 Nov 2011 sestatus(8)
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