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chflags(1) [bsd man page]

CHFLAGS(1)						      General Commands Manual							CHFLAGS(1)

NAME
chflags - change file flags SYNOPSIS
chflags [-R] [-f]flags file ... DESCRIPTION
The chflags utility modifies the file flags of the listed files as specified by the flags operand. The options are as follows: -R Change the file flags for the file hierarchies rooted in the files instead of just the files themselves. -f chflags will not complain if it fails to change the flags on a file. Flags are a comma separated list of keywords. The following keywords are currently defined: arch No effect. This bit is defined and will be set/cleared as requested but nothing in the system makes use of it yet. dump Set the dump flag sappnd Set the system append-only flag (super-user only) schg Set the system immutable flag (super-user only) uappnd Set the user append-only flag (owner or super-user only) uchg Set the user immutable flag (owner or super-user only) Putting the letters no before an option causes the flag to be turned off. For example: nodump the file should never be dumped Symbolic links do not have flags and are silently ignored by chflags. When the -R option is given and symbolic links are encountered they are not traversed. This is the same behaviour as chmod(1). The chflags utility exits 0 on success, and >0 if an error occurs. SEE ALSO
chflags(2), stat(2), symlink(7) 4th Berkeley Distribution November 28, 1994 CHFLAGS(1)

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CHFLAGS(1)						    BSD General Commands Manual 						CHFLAGS(1)

NAME
chflags -- change file flags SYNOPSIS
chflags [-fhv] [-R [-H | -L | -P]] flags file ... DESCRIPTION
The chflags utility modifies the file flags of the listed files as specified by the flags operand. The options are as follows: -f Do not display a diagnostic message if chflags could not modify the flags for file, nor modify the exit status to reflect such fail- ures. -H If the -R option is specified, symbolic links on the command line are followed. (Symbolic links encountered in the tree traversal are not followed.) -h If the file is a symbolic link, change the file flags of the link itself rather than the file to which it points. -L If the -R option is specified, all symbolic links are followed. -P If the -R option is specified, no symbolic links are followed. This is the default. -R Change the file flags for the file hierarchies rooted in the files instead of just the files themselves. -v Cause chflags to be verbose, showing filenames as the flags are modified. If the -v option is specified more than once, the old and new flags of the file will also be printed, in octal notation. The flags are specified as an octal number or a comma separated list of keywords. The following keywords are currently defined: arch, archived set the archived flag (super-user only) opaque set the opaque flag (owner or super-user only). [Directory is opaque when viewed through a union mount] nodump set the nodump flag (owner or super-user only) sappnd, sappend set the system append-only flag (super-user only) schg, schange, simmutable set the system immutable flag (super-user only) uappnd, uappend set the user append-only flag (owner or super-user only) uchg, uchange, uimmutable set the user immutable flag (owner or super-user only) hidden set the hidden flag [Hide item from GUI] As discussed in chflags(2), the sappnd and schg flags may only be unset when the system is in single-user mode. Putting the letters ``no'' before or removing the letters ``no'' from a keyword causes the flag to be cleared. For example: nouchg clear the user immutable flag (owner or super-user only) dump clear the nodump flag (owner or super-user only) Unless the -H or -L options are given, chflags on a symbolic link always succeeds and has no effect. The -H, -L and -P options are ignored unless the -R option is specified. In addition, these options override each other and the command's actions are determined by the last one specified. You can use "ls -lO" to see the flags of existing files. EXIT STATUS
The chflags utility exits 0 on success, and >0 if an error occurs. SEE ALSO
ls(1), chflags(2), stat(2), fts(3), symlink(7) HISTORY
The chflags command first appeared in 4.4BSD. BUGS
Only a limited number of utilities are chflags aware. Some of these tools include ls(1), cp(1), find(1), install(1), dump(8), and restore(8). In particular a tool which is not currently chflags aware is the pax(1) utility. BSD
March 3, 2006 BSD
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