"How do i start a new thread with my android phone?"

Post #303026945 by Neo on Wednesday 5th of December 2018 10:53:25 AM

Use your Thread-O-Matic Discombobulator?
 

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THREAD-KEYRING(7)					     Linux Programmer's Manual						 THREAD-KEYRING(7)

NAME
thread-keyring - per-thread keyring DESCRIPTION
The thread keyring is a keyring used to anchor keys on behalf of a process. It is created only when a thread requests it. The thread keyring has the name (description) _tid. A special serial number value, KEY_SPEC_THREAD_KEYRING, is defined that can be used in lieu of the actual serial number of the calling thread's thread keyring. From the keyctl(1) utility, '@t' can be used instead of a numeric key ID in much the same way, but as keyctl(1) is a program run after forking, this is of no utility. Thread keyrings are not inherited across clone(2) and fork(2) and are cleared by execve(2). A thread keyring is destroyed when the thread that refers to it terminates. Initially, a thread does not have a thread keyring. If a thread doesn't have a thread keyring when it is accessed, then it will be created if it is to be modified; otherwise the operation fails with the error ENOKEY. SEE ALSO
keyctl(1), keyctl(3), keyrings(7), persistent-keyring(7), process-keyring(7), session-keyring(7), user-keyring(7), user-session-keyring(7) Linux 2017-03-13 THREAD-KEYRING(7)

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