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Determining how long device has been in defined state

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Old 02-04-2013
jwholey jwholey is offline
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Determining how long device has been in defined state

All,

Hoping you can help. I'm wondering how I can determine how long a device (network interface) has been in a defined state. Know there's a way, just can't figure it out.

Thanks in advance!
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Old 02-04-2013
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Afaik something like that is not being logged right out of the box. You could check the ODM, if there is any kind of timestamp somewhere associated with the appropriate interface (have no AIX to check at the moment), but I quite doubt that. I also doubt it is written to the Error Report, but you can try out that very easy. Error Report is bound to a buffer size and it`s entries will be overwritten, if too many messages go in there.

If you have Auditing (Accounting and Auditing on AIX 5L) set up you could be lucky to find some traces of any shell input. If not, you could set this up if things like this are in your interesst.

You could also think about to use something to track config changes like SPM.
There was also an AIX native tool, but I do not remember itīs name. Xray was using it - I will drop him a PM, to help me recall itīs name

If the user had to use sudo to issue the command, you might be lucky with the sudo logs.

If it was done via smitty, check smitty.log.
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Old 02-04-2013
dukessd dukessd is offline Forum Advisor  
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You could use alog to check the boot log file but on most systems I see they wrap at a couple of boots, or less, so it may be lost.

Just like the errlog file these are way too small by default.

The errlog is by default 1MB of disk space on a system with 4, 16, 64 GB ram, this is silly, turn it up people if you want to have any idea of what happened!

I've seen systems fill the errlog in less than a minute!
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Old 02-05-2013
jwholey jwholey is offline
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Thanks for the updates... appreciated. One of the SA's who supports my app has advised me that a few network interfaces went into defined state over a year ago. I'm not suggesting something nefarious is going on, I would simply like to know how he determined that.
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Um, did you think of asking them?
Please post back if it is anything other than "because I noticed it in the lsdev output" ;0)
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Old 02-11-2013
MichaelFelt MichaelFelt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwholey View Post
Thanks for the updates... appreciated. One of the SA's who supports my app has advised me that a few network interfaces went into defined state over a year ago. I'm not suggesting something nefarious is going on, I would simply like to know how he determined that.
Basically, you should also ask - went into Defined state from what.

FYI (although you may know this already) - Defined means, simply, that there is an entry in the CuDv (Customized Device) ODM file. Available means there is "also" a system driver/kernel extension that is associated with the device.

An Available device can be made Defined by using the command
rmdev -l devName
And made available using the command
mkdev -l devName

AND: this needs to all be happening via the ODM

Code:
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]lsdev -C | grep et
en0        Available       Standard Ethernet Network Interface
ent0       Available       Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)
et0        Defined         IEEE 802.3 Ethernet Network Interface


Code:
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]ifconfig et0
et0: flags=1e080822,480<BROADCAST,NOTRAILERS,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST,GROUPRT,64BIT,CHECKSUM_OFFLOAD(ACTIVE),CHAIN>
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]ifconfig et0 10.1.1.1 up
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]ifconfig et0            
et0: flags=1e080863,480<UP,BROADCAST,NOTRAILERS,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST,GROUPRT,64BIT,CHECKSUM_OFFLOAD(ACTIVE),CHAIN>
        inet 10.1.1.1 netmask 0xff000000 broadcast 10.255.255.255


Code:
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]lsdev -C | grep et0
et0        Defined         IEEE 802.3 Ethernet Network Interface
inet0      Available       Internet Network Extension


Code:
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]chdev -a netaddr=10.2.2.2 -a state=up -l et0
et0 changed


Code:
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]lsdev -C | grep et0                         
et0        Available       IEEE 802.3 Ethernet Network Interface
inet0      Available       Internet Network Extension


Code:
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]ifconfig et0
et0: flags=1e080863,480<UP,BROADCAST,NOTRAILERS,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST,GROUPRT,64BIT,CHECKSUM_OFFLOAD(ACTIVE),CHAIN>
        inet 10.2.2.2 netmask 0xff000000 broadcast 10.255.255.255


Code:
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]rmdev -l et0
et0 Defined
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]ifconfig et0
et0: flags=1e080822,480<BROADCAST,NOTRAILERS,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST,GROUPRT,64BIT,CHECKSUM_OFFLOAD(ACTIVE),CHAIN>
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]lsdev -C | grep et0
et0        Defined         IEEE 802.3 Ethernet Network Interface


Code:
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]mkdev -l et0
et0 Available
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]lsdev -C | grep et0
et0        Available       IEEE 802.3 Ethernet Network Interface


Code:
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]chdev -l et0 -a state=down
et0 changed
root@x107:[/export/lpp/7102/installp/ppc]lsdev -C | grep et0       
et0        Stopped         IEEE 802.3 Ethernet Network Interface
inet0      Available       Internet Network Extension

In short, what I hope to point out - defined is a particular - and often NORMAL state for devices listed by lsdev. Especially if the device is being managed "manually" rather than via ODM (aka cfgmgr).

I hope this clarifies (helps) with understanding device states on AIX.
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