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GNU = inventions that nobody wants?

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# 1  
Old 01-04-2018
GNU = inventions that nobody wants?

Stumbled over this today on GNU/Linux, output from ps -fp :
Code:
UID        PID  PPID  C STIME TTY          TIME CMD
root      3516     1  0  2017 ?        00:00:13 syslogd -m 0
UID        PID  PPID  C STIME TTY          TIME CMD
syslog    2952     1  0  2017 ?        00:02:08 rsyslogd

STIME showing 2017? Who needs this gimmick? We have January 2018!
Much better on Unix:
Code:
     UID   PID  PPID   C    STIME TTY         TIME CMD
    root   906     1   0   Dec 16 ?           0:07 /usr/sbin/syslogd

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dodona (01-04-2018), Neo (01-04-2018), RavinderSingh13 (01-04-2018)
# 2  
Old 01-04-2018
May not be too satisfying, but that's the documented behaviour for (man ps)
Quote:
start_time START starting time or date of the process. Only the year will be displayed if the process was not started the same year ps was invoked, or "MmmDD" if it was not started the same day, or "HH:MM" otherwise. See also bsdstart, start, lstart, and stime.
Using e.g. start or bsdstart as format specifiers, it will (presumably) behave like the Unix example that you gave above.
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MadeInGermany (01-04-2018)
# 3  
Old 01-04-2018
Ah yes, the non-standard "START" and "BSDSTART" say it correctly
Code:
ps -p 3516 -o stime,start,bsdstart,lstart,etime
STIME  STARTED  START                  STARTED     ELAPSED
 2017   Dec 19 Dec 19 Tue Dec 19 17:10:57 2017 15-21:43:58

But a casual ps -f gives STIME and that's unusable.
A bit more intelligent would have been to check the "etime" and switch to the year if the etime is > 360 days.
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dodona (01-04-2018)
# 4  
Old 01-07-2018
Interesting. To be honest i find the behavior of df -h much more annoying. Here is my PC:

Code:
# df -h
Filesystem                 Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
udev                        63G     0   63G   0% /dev
tmpfs                       13G   11M   13G   1% /run
/dev/mapper/rootvg-rootlv  9.8G  5.6G  3.7G  61% /
tmpfs                       63G  168K   63G   1% /dev/shm
tmpfs                      5.0M  4.0K  5.0M   1% /run/lock
tmpfs                       63G     0   63G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/mapper/rootvg-altrlv  9.8G  8.2G  1.2G  88% /altroot
/dev/mapper/rootvg-homelv  9.8G  2.4G  7.0G  25% /home
/dev/mapper/rootvg-imglv    49G  6.5G   41G  14% /opt/images
/dev/sda1                  511M  4.6M  507M   1% /boot/efi
tmpfs                       13G   16K   13G   1% /run/user/1000

First: I would like to see the filesystems not all sorts of gimmicks. The output of mount is equally unusable, because ones wades through lists of "virtual filesystems", which are no filesystems at all.

But what takes the biscuit is the different units in which the output is formatted: MB, GB and even KB all mixed together and you have no immediate picture what is filled to which extent. In AIX i use df -g and know what i want to know within a second.

bakunin
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# 5  
Old 01-08-2018
df -Bg should work
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# 6  
Old 01-08-2018
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarloM
df -Bg should work
Thanks a lot, i didn't know that. This still leaves the "tmpfs" entries and the "udev", but at least one of the problems is solved. Good catch!

bakunin
# 7  
Old 01-08-2018
df -Bg -xtmpfs -xdevtmpfs! Getting a tad unwieldy, but I guess you could alias it.
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