A seriously interesting article about fab times.

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# 1  
A seriously interesting article about fab times.

Not sure if this is the right forum but......

This is an article about the difficulties in the engineering of 14nM fabs and lower production techniques.

Semiconductor Engineering .:. Battling Fab Cycle Times

Enjoy...
# 2  
That really is a great article, I think one of the ways Intel is going to work around this is multi process chips... so things that aren't as performance intensive are going to be made on older faster cheaper processes, or more optimized processes. So they can make IO optimized drivers for high speed ram interfaces, logic optimized areas for the CPU, and low cost peripheral areas. It is certainly interesting to see companies trying to cope with the limits they are running up against. As well as they can conentrate on making only one sub unit faster per generation... rather than thier tick - tock tock they have been doing. They could do some iteration on aspects of the design without having to worry about parts that won't change getting broken by moving to a new process etc.. .

I've seen some ideas about die stacking of CPU and GPU components instead of chips ram as is done with HBM. So, perhaps they would make tiny very high yeild dies, but stack a bunch of them and run them rather slowly for a higher aggregate speed so they don't fry themselves with heat.

As an aside I've actually seen Daifuku (Wynright is the specific branch I've worked with) equipment installed in several locations where I have been out on an on site setup trip for the equipment my employer makes... very cool cranes (I've seen them shuffling shoe boxes and potato chips) though apparently they shuffle computer chips around as well!

Last edited by cb88; 05-24-2017 at 11:03 PM..
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Dennis Ritchie

Dennis Ritchie was born on September 9, 1941 in Bronxville, New York. His father was Alistair E. Ritchie, a longtime Bell Labs scientist and co-author of The Design of Switching Circuits on switching circuit theory. As a child, Dennis moved with his family to Summit, New Jersey, where he graduated from Summit High School. He graduated from Harvard University with degrees in physics and applied mathematics.
Dennis created the C programming language, the basis of most all modern computer software including Unix and Linux.
Dennis began working at the Bell Labs Computing Sciences Research Center in 1967. In 1968, he defended his PhD thesis on "Program Structure and Computational Complexity" at Harvard under the supervision of Patrick C. Fischer. Dennis never officially received his PhD degree.
During the 1960s, Dennis Richie and Ken Thompson worked on the Multics operating system at Bell Labs. Ken Thompson, aided by Dennis and others, took an old PDP-7 machine and developed their own application programs and operating system from scratch. In 1970, Brian Kernighan suggested the name "Unix", a pun on the name "Multics". To supplement assembly language with a system-level programming language, Ken Thompson created B. Later, B was replaced by C, created by Dennis Ritchie, who continued to contribute to the development of Unix and C for many years.
During the 1970s, Dennis collaborated with James Reeds and Robert Morris on a ciphertext-only attack on the M-209 US cipher machine that could solve messages of at least 2000–2500 letters. He said that, after discussions with the NSA, they decided not to publish it because the principle was applicable to machines still in use by foreign governments. Dennis was also involved with the development of the Plan 9, the Inferno operating systems, and the programming language Limbo. As part of an AT&T restructuring in the mid-1990s, Dennis was transferred to Lucent Technologies, where he retired in 2007 as head of System Software Research Department.
Dennis Ritchie passed away or or about October 12, 2011 (aged 70) at his home in Berkeley Heights, New Jersey.
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