Oracle buys Sun

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Java Oracle buys Sun

On April 20, 2009, Oracle announced that it had agreed to acquire Sun Microsystems. The proposed transaction is subject to Sun stockholder approval, certain regulatory approvals and customary closing conditions. Until the deal closes, each company will continue to operate independently, and it is business as usual.
This acquisition combines best-in-class enterprise software and mission-critical computing systems. Oracle plans to engineer and deliver an integrated system – applications to disk – where all the pieces fit and work together, so customers do not have to do it themselves. Customers benefit as their systems integration costs go down while system performance, reliability, and security go up.
Oracle’s ownership of two key Sun software assets, Java and Solaris, is expected to provide our customers with significant benefit. Java is one of the computer industry’s best known brands and most widely deployed technologies. Oracle Fusion Middleware is built on top of Sun’s Java language and software. Oracle can now ensure continued innovation and investment in Java technology for the benefit of customers and the Java community.
The Sun Solaris operating system is the leading platform for the Oracle database. With the acquisition of Sun, Oracle can optimize the Oracle database for some of the unique, high-end features of Solaris. Oracle is as committed as ever to Linux and other open platforms and will continue to support and enhance our strong industry partnerships.
Our customers have been asking us to step up to a broader role to reduce complexity, risk, and cost by delivering a highly-optimized, standards-based product stack. Oracle plans to deliver that benefit by offering a broad range of products, including servers and storage, with all the integrated pieces: hardware operating system, database, middleware and applications. We plan to preserve and enhance investments made by our customers, while we continue to
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Dennis Ritchie

Dennis Ritchie was born on September 9, 1941 in Bronxville, New York. His father was Alistair E. Ritchie, a longtime Bell Labs scientist and co-author of The Design of Switching Circuits on switching circuit theory. As a child, Dennis moved with his family to Summit, New Jersey, where he graduated from Summit High School. He graduated from Harvard University with degrees in physics and applied mathematics.
Dennis created the C programming language, the basis of most all modern computer software including Unix and Linux.
Dennis began working at the Bell Labs Computing Sciences Research Center in 1967. In 1968, he defended his PhD thesis on "Program Structure and Computational Complexity" at Harvard under the supervision of Patrick C. Fischer. Dennis never officially received his PhD degree.
During the 1960s, Dennis Richie and Ken Thompson worked on the Multics operating system at Bell Labs. Ken Thompson, aided by Dennis and others, took an old PDP-7 machine and developed their own application programs and operating system from scratch. In 1970, Brian Kernighan suggested the name "Unix", a pun on the name "Multics". To supplement assembly language with a system-level programming language, Ken Thompson created B. Later, B was replaced by C, created by Dennis Ritchie, who continued to contribute to the development of Unix and C for many years.
During the 1970s, Dennis collaborated with James Reeds and Robert Morris on a ciphertext-only attack on the M-209 US cipher machine that could solve messages of at least 2000–2500 letters. He said that, after discussions with the NSA, they decided not to publish it because the principle was applicable to machines still in use by foreign governments. Dennis was also involved with the development of the Plan 9, the Inferno operating systems, and the programming language Limbo. As part of an AT&T restructuring in the mid-1990s, Dennis was transferred to Lucent Technologies, where he retired in 2007 as head of System Software Research Department.
Dennis Ritchie passed away or or about October 12, 2011 (aged 70) at his home in Berkeley Heights, New Jersey.
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