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ipfs(1m) [sunos man page]

ipfs(1M)						  System Administration Commands						  ipfs(1M)

NAME
ipfs - saves and restores information for NAT and state tables SYNOPSIS
ipfs [-nv] -l ipfs [-nv] -u ipfs [-nv] [-d dirname] -R ipfs [-nv] [-d dirname] -W ipfs [-nNSv] [-f filename] -r ipfs [-nNSv] [-f filename] -w ipfs [-nNSv] -f filename -i <if1>,<if2> DESCRIPTION
The ipfs utility enables the saving of state information across reboots. Specifically, the utility allows state information created for NAT entries and rules using "keep state" to be locked (modification prevented) and then saved to disk. Then, after a reboot, that information is restored. The result of this state-saving is that connections are not interrupted. OPTIONS
The following options are supported: -d Change the default directory used with -R and -W options for saving state information. -n Do not take any action that would affect information stored in the kernel or on disk. -v Provides a verbose description of ipfs activities. -N Operate on NAT information. -S Operate on filtering state information. -u Unlock state tables in the kernel. -l Lock state tables in the kernel. -r Read information in from the specified file and load it into the kernel. This requires the state tables to have already been locked and does not change the lock once complete. -w Write information out to the specified file and from the kernel. This requires the state tables to have already been locked and does not change the lock once complete. -R Restores all saved state information, if any, from two files, ipstate.ipf and ipnat.ipf, stored in the /var/db/ipf directory. This directory can be changed with the -d option. The state tables are locked at the beginning of this operation and unlocked once complete. -W Saves in-kernel state information, if any, out to two files, ipstate.ipf and ipnat.ipf, stored in the /var/db/ipf directory. This directory can be changed with the -d option. The state tables are locked at the beginning of this operation and unlocked once complete. FILES
o /var/db/ipf/ipstate.ipf o /var/db/ipf/ipnat.ipf o /dev/ipl o /dev/ipstate o /dev/ipnat ATTRIBUTES
See attributes(5) for descriptions of the following attributes: +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ | ATTRIBUTE TYPE | ATTRIBUTE VALUE | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ |Availability |SUNWipfu | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ |Interface Stability |Evolving | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ SEE ALSO
ipf(1M), ipmon(1M), ipnat(1M), attributes(5) NOTES
To view license terms, attribution, and copyright for IP Filter, the default path is /usr/lib/ipf/IPFILTER.LICENCE. If the Solaris operat- ing environment has been installed anywhere other than the default, modify the given path to access the file at the installed location. DIAGNOSTICS
Arguably, the -W and -R operations should set the locking and, rather than undo it, restore it to what it was previously. Fragment table information is currently not saved. SunOS 5.10 1 Oct 2003 ipfs(1M)

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ipnat(1M)																 ipnat(1M)

NAME
ipnat - user interface to the NAT subsystem SYNOPSIS
ipnat [-dlhnrsvCF] -f filename The ipnat utility opens a specified file (treating - as stdin) and parses it for a set of rules that are to be added or removed from the IP NAT. If there are no parsing problems, each rule processed by ipnat is added to the kernel's internal lists. Rules are appended to the internal lists, matching the order in which they appear when given to ipnat. ipnat's use is restricted through access to /dev/ipauth, /dev/ipl, and /dev/ipstate. The default permissions of these files require ipnat to be run as root for all operations. ipnat's use is restricted through access to /dev/ipnat. The default permissions of /dev/ipnat require ipnat to be run as root for all oper- ations. The following options are supported: -C Delete all entries in the current NAT rule listing (NAT rules). -F Delete all active entries in the current NAT translation table (currently active NAT mappings). -d Turn debug mode on. Causes a hex dump of filter rules to be generated as it processes each one. -f filename Parse specified file for rules to be added or removed from the IP NAT. filename can be stdin. -h Print number of hits for each MAP/Redirect filter. -l Show the list of current NAT table entry mappings. -n Prevents ipf from doing anything, such as making ioctl calls, which might alter the currently running kernel. -s Retrieve and display NAT statistics. -r Remove matching NAT rules rather than add them to the internal lists. -v Turn verbose mode on. Displays information relating to rule processing and active rules/table entries. /dev/ipnat Link to IP Filter pseudo device. /dev/kmem Special file that provides access to virtual address space. /etc/ipf/ipnat.conf Location of ipnat startup configuration file. /usr/share/ipfilter/examples/ Contains numerous IP Filter examples. See attributes(5) for descriptions of the following attributes: +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ | ATTRIBUTE TYPE | ATTRIBUTE VALUE | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ |Availability |SUNWipfu | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ |Interface Stability |Evolving | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ ipf(1M), ipfstat(1M), ipnat(4), attributes(5) To view license terms, attribution, and copyright for IP Filter, the default path is /usr/lib/ipf/IPFILTER.LICENCE. If the Solaris operat- ing environment has been installed anywhere other than the default, modify the given path to access the file at the installed location. 25 Jul 2005 ipnat(1M)

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