Home Man
Search
Today's Posts
Register

Linux & Unix Commands - Search Man Pages

RedHat 9 (Linux i386) - man page for incoming.conf (redhat section 5)

INCOMING.CONF(5)		       File Formats Manual			 INCOMING.CONF(5)

NAME
       incoming.conf - names and addresses that feed us news

DESCRIPTION
       The  file  <pathetc  in	inn.conf>/incoming.conf  consists  of  three  types  of  entries:
       key/value, peer and group.  Comments are taken from the hash character ``#'' to the end of
       the  line.   Blank  lines are ignored.  All key/value entries within each type must not be
       duplicated.

       Key/value entries are a keyword immediately followed by a colon, at least one blank and	a
       value. For example:

		     max-connections: 10

       A  legal  key  contains	nor blanks, nor colon, nor ``#''.  There are 3 different types of
       values:	integers,  booleans, and strings.  Integers are as  to	be  expected.  A  boolean
       value  is  either ``true'' or ``false'' (case is significant). A string value is any other
       sequence of characters. If the string needs to contain whitespace, then it must be  quoted
       with double quotes.

       Peer entries look like:

		      peer <name> {
			   # body
		      }

       The  word ``peer'' is required. ``<name>''is a label for this peer.  The ``<name>'' is any
       string valid as a key. The body of a peer entry contains some number of key/value entries.

       Group entries look like:

		      group <name> {
			   # body
		      }

       The word ``group'' is required. The ``<name>'' is any string valid as a key. The body of a
       group  entry  contains any number of the three types of entries. So key/value pairs can be
       defined inside a group, and peers can be nested inside a group, and other  groups  can  be
       nested inside a group.

       Key/value entries that are defined outside of all peer and group entries are said to be at
       ``global scope''. Global key/value entries act as defaults for peers. When  innd(8)  looks
       for  a  specific  value in a peer entry (for example, the maximum number of connections to
       allow), if the value is not defined in the peer entry, then the enclosing groups are exam-
       ined  for  the  entry (starting at the closest enclosing group). If there are no enclosing
       groups, or the enclosing groups don't define the key/value, then the value at global scope
       is used.

       A small example could be:

	      # Global value applied to all peers that have
	      # no value of their own.
	      max-connections: 5

	      # A peer definition.
	      peer uunet {
		   hostname: usenet1.uu.net
	      }

	      peer vixie {
		   hostname: gw.home.vix.com
		   max-connections: 10 # override global value.
	      }

	      # A group of two peers who can open more
	      # connections than normal
	      group fast-sites {
		   max-connections: 15

		   # Another peer. The ``max-connections'' value from the
		   # ``fast-sites'' group scope is used. The ``hostname'' value
		   # defaults to the peer's name.
		   peer data.ramona.vix.com {
		   }

		   peer bb.home.vix.com {
		       hostname: bb.home.vix.com
		       max-connections: 20 # he can really cook.
		  }
	      }

       Given  the above configuration file, the defined peers would have the following values for
       the ``max-connections'' key.

		      uunet		     5
		      vixie		    10
		      data.ramona.vix.com   15
		      bb.home.vix.com	    20

       Ten keys are allowed:

       hostname:
	      This key requires a string value. It is a list of hostnames separated by a comma. A
	      hostname is the host's FQDN, or the dotted quad ip-address of the peer. If this key
	      is not present in a peer block, the hostname defaults to the label of the peer.

       streaming:
	      This key requires a boolean  value.  It  defines	whether  streaming  commands  are
	      allowed from this peer. (default=true)

       max-connections:
	      This  key requires positive integer value. It defines the maximum number of connec-
	      tions allowed. A value of zero specifies an unlimited number of maximum connections
	      (``unlimited'' or ``none'' can be used as synonym).  (default=0)

       hold-time:
	      This key requires positive integer value. It defines the hold time before close, if
	      the connection is over max-connections. A value of zero specifies immediate  close.
	      (default=0)

       password:
	      This  key requires a string value. It is used if you wish to require a peer to sup-
	      ply a password. (default=no password)

       patterns:
	      This key requires a string value. It is a list of newsfeeds(5) style list of  news-
	      groups which are to be accepted from this host. (default="*")

       email: This key requires a string value. Reserved for future use. (default=empty)

       comment:
	      This key requires a string value. Reserved for future use. (default=empty)

       skip:  This  key  requires  a  boolean  value.  Setting	this entry causes this peer to be
	      skipped. (default=false)

       noresendid:
	      This key requires a boolean value. It defines whether  innd(8)  should  send  ``431
	      RESENDID''  responses  if  a message is offered that is being received from another
	      peer. This can be useful for peers that resend  messages	right  away,  as  innfeed
	      does. (default=false)

HISTORY
       Written by Fabien Tassin <fta@sofaraway.org> for InterNetNews.  This is revision 1.11.2.3,
       dated 2001/01/12.

SEE ALSO
       inn.conf(5), innd(8), newsfeeds(5), wildmat(3).

										 INCOMING.CONF(5)


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:06 PM.

Unix & Linux Forums Content Copyrightę1993-2018. All Rights Reserved.
UNIX.COM Login
Username:
Password:  
Show Password