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ftok(3) [redhat man page]

FTOK(3) 						     Linux Programmer's Manual							   FTOK(3)

NAME
ftok - convert a pathname and a project identifier to a System V IPC key SYNOPSIS
# include <sys/types.h> # include <sys/ipc.h> key_t ftok(const char *pathname, int proj_id); DESCRIPTION
The ftok function uses the identity of the file named by the given pathname (which must refer to an existing, accessible file) and the least significant 8 bits of proj_id (which must be nonzero) to generate a key_t type System V IPC key, suitable for use with msgget(2), semget(2), or shmget(2). The resulting value is the same for all pathnames that name the same file, when the same value of proj_id is used. The value returned should be different when the (simultaneously existing) files or the project IDs differ. RETURN VALUE
On success the generated key_t value is returned. On failure -1 is returned, with errno indicating the error as for the stat(2) system call. CONFORMING TO
XPG4 NOTES
Under libc4 and libc5 (and under SunOS 4.x) the prototype was key_t ftok(char *pathname, char proj_id); Today proj_id is an int, but still only 8 bits are used. Typical usage has an ASCII character proj_id, that is why the behaviour is said to be undefined when proj_id is zero. Of course no guarantee can be given that the resulting key_t is unique. Typically, a best effort attempt combines the given proj_id byte, the lower 16 bits of the i-node number, and the lower 8 bits of the device number into a 32-bit result. Collisions may easily happen, for example between files on /dev/hda1 and files on /dev/sda1. SEE ALSO
ipc(5), msgget(2), semget(2), shmget(2), stat(2) Linux 2.4 2001-11-28 FTOK(3)

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FTOK(3) 						     Linux Programmer's Manual							   FTOK(3)

NAME
ftok - convert a pathname and a project identifier to a System V IPC key SYNOPSIS
#include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/ipc.h> key_t ftok(const char *pathname, int proj_id); DESCRIPTION
The ftok() function uses the identity of the file named by the given pathname (which must refer to an existing, accessible file) and the least significant 8 bits of proj_id (which must be nonzero) to generate a key_t type System V IPC key, suitable for use with msgget(2), semget(2), or shmget(2). The resulting value is the same for all pathnames that name the same file, when the same value of proj_id is used. The value returned should be different when the (simultaneously existing) files or the project IDs differ. RETURN VALUE
On success, the generated key_t value is returned. On failure -1 is returned, with errno indicating the error as for the stat(2) system call. CONFORMING TO
POSIX.1-2001. NOTES
Under libc4 and libc5 (and under SunOS 4.x) the prototype was: key_t ftok(char *pathname, char proj_id); Today proj_id is an int, but still only 8 bits are used. Typical usage has an ASCII character proj_id, that is why the behavior is said to be undefined when proj_id is zero. Of course no guarantee can be given that the resulting key_t is unique. Typically, a best effort attempt combines the given proj_id byte, the lower 16 bits of the inode number, and the lower 8 bits of the device number into a 32-bit result. Collisions may easily happen, for example between files on /dev/hda1 and files on /dev/sda1. SEE ALSO
msgget(2), semget(2), shmget(2), stat(2), svipc(7) COLOPHON
This page is part of release 3.44 of the Linux man-pages project. A description of the project, and information about reporting bugs, can be found at http://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/. GNU
2001-11-28 FTOK(3)
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