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RedHat 9 (Linux i386) - man page for vacuumdb (redhat section 1)

VACUUMDB(1)			  PostgreSQL Client Applications		      VACUUMDB(1)

NAME
       vacuumdb - garbage-collect and analyze a PostgreSQL database

SYNOPSIS
       vacuumdb [ connection-options... ] [ --full | -f ] [ --verbose | -v ] [ --analyze | -z ] [
       --table | -t 'table [ ( column [,...] ) ]' ] [ dbname ]

       vacuumdb [ connection-options... ] [ --all | -a ] [ --full | -f ] [ --verbose  |  -v  ]	[
       --analyze | -z ]

DESCRIPTION
       vacuumdb  is  a	utility  for cleaning a PostgreSQL database.  vacuumdb will also generate
       internal statistics used by the PostgreSQL query optimizer.

       vacuumdb is a shell script wrapper around the backend command VACUUM [vacuum(7)]  via  the
       PostgreSQL  interactive terminal psql(1). There is no effective difference between vacuum-
       ing databases via this or other methods.  psql must be found by the script and a  database
       server  must  be  running at the targeted host. Also, any default settings and environment
       variables available to psql and the libpq front-end library do apply.

       vacuumdb might need to connect several times to the PostgreSQL server, asking for a  pass-
       word each time. It is convenient to have a $HOME/.pgpass file in such cases.

OPTIONS
       vacuumdb accepts the following command-line arguments:

       [-d] dbname

       [--dbname] dbname
	      Specifies the name of the database to be cleaned or analyzed.  If this is not spec-
	      ified and -a (or --all) is not used, the database name is read from the environment
	      variable PGDATABASE. If that is not set, the user name specified for the connection
	      is used.

       -a

       --all  Vacuum all databases.

       -e

       --echo Echo the commands that vacuumdb generates and sends to the server.

       -f

       --full Perform ``full'' vacuuming.

       -q

       --quiet
	      Do not display a response.

       -t table [ (column [,...]) ]

       --table table [ (column [,...]) ]
	      Clean or analyze table only.  Column names may be  specified  only  in  conjunction
	      with the --analyze option.

	      Tip:  If you specify columns to vacuum, you probably have to escape the parentheses
	      from the shell.

       -v

       --verbose
	      Print detailed information during processing.

       -z

       --analyze
	      Calculate statistics for use by the optimizer.

       vacuumdb also accepts the following command-line arguments for connection parameters:

       -h host

       --host host
	      Specifies the host name of the machine on which the  server  is  running.  If  host
	      begins with a slash, it is used as the directory for the Unix domain socket.

       -p port

       --port port
	      Specifies  the  Internet	TCP/IP port or local Unix domain socket file extension on
	      which the server is listening for connections.

       -U username

       --username username
	      User name to connect as

       -W

       --password
	      Force password prompt.

DIAGNOSTICS
       VACUUM Everything went well.

       vacuumdb: Vacuum failed.
	      Something went wrong. vacuumdb is only a wrapper script. See VACUUM [vacuum(7)] and
	      psql(1) for a detailed discussion of error messages and potential problems.

ENVIRONMENT
       PGDATABASE

       PGHOST

       PGPORT

       PGUSER Default connection parameters.

EXAMPLES
       To clean the database test:

       $ vacuumdb test

       To clean and analyze for the optimizer a database named bigdb:

       $ vacuumdb --analyze bigdb

       To  clean a single table foo in a database named xyzzy, and analyze a single column bar of
       the table for the optimizer:

       $ vacuumdb --analyze --verbose --table 'foo(bar)' xyzzy

SEE ALSO
       VACUUM [vacuum(7)]

Application				    2002-11-22				      VACUUMDB(1)


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