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RedHat 9 (Linux i386) - man page for spamassassin (redhat section 1)

SPAMASSASSIN(1) 					User Contributed Perl Documentation					   SPAMASSASSIN(1)

NAME
spamassassin - mail filter to identify spam using text analysis
SYNOPSIS
spamassassin [options] < mailmessage > output spamassassin -d < mailmessage > <output> spamassassin -r [-w addr] < mailmessage spamassassin -W|-R < mailmessage Options: -P, --pipe Deliver to STDOUT (now default) -L, --local Local tests only (no online tests) -r, --report Report message as spam -w addr, --warning-from=addr Send a warning mail to sender from addr -d, --remove-markup Remove spam reports from a message -C file, --config-file=file Set configuration file -p prefs, --prefs-file=file Set user preferences file -x, --nouser-config Disable user config files -e, --exit-code Exit with a non-zero exit code if the tested message was spam -l filename, --log-to-mbox=file Log messages to a mbox file -t, --test-mode Pipe message through and add extra report to the bottom --lint Lint the rule set: report syntax errors -a, --auto-whitelist Use auto-whitelists -W, --add-to-whitelist Add addresses in mail to whitelist --add-to-blacklist Add addresses in mail to blacklist -R, --remove-from-whitelist Remove all addresses found in mail from whitelist --add-addr-to-whitelist=addr Add addr to whitelist --add-addr-to-blacklist=addr Add addr to blacklist --remove-addr-from-whitelist=addr Remove addr from whitelist -M, --whitelist-factory Select whitelist factory -D, --debug [area=n,...] Print debugging messages -V, --version Print version -h, --help Print usage message
OPTIONS
-P, --pipe The -P parameter will cause SpamAssassin to pipe the output to STDOUT. This is now the default mode of operation, so this switch is obsolete, and should not be used anymore. -a, --auto-whitelist, --whitelist Use auto-whitelists. Auto-whitelists track the long-term average score for each sender and then shift the score of new messages toward that long-term average. This can increase or decrease the score for messages, depending on the long-term behavior of the particular correspondent. See the README file for more details. -e, --error-code, --exit-code Exit with a non-zero error code, if the message is determined to be spam. -h, --help Print help message and exit. -t, --test-mode Test mode. Pipe message through and add extra report. Note that the report text assumes that the message is spam, since in normal use it is only visible in this case. Pay attention to the score instead. If you run tests with the -a option, the scores will be added to the AWL. This may not be what you want to do. If it is not, then don't use -a -t. -r, --report Report this message as verified spam. This will submit the mail message read from STDIN to various spam-blocker databases. Currently, these are Vipul's Razor ( http://razor.sourceforge.net/ ) and the Distributed Checksum Clearinghouse ( http://www.rhyo- lite.com/anti-spam/dcc/ ). If the message contains SpamAssassin markup, this will be stripped out automatically before submission. The support modules for DCC and Razor must be installed for spam to be reported to each service. --lint Syntax check (lint) the rule set and configuration files, reporting typos and rules that do not compile correctly. Exits immediately with 0 if there are no errors, or greater than 0 if any errors are found. -W, --add-to-whitelist Add all email addresses, in the headers and body of the mail message read from STDIN, to the automatic whitelist. Note that you must be running "spamassassin" or "spamd" with the -a switch for this to work. --add-to-blacklist Add all email addresses, in the headers and body of the mail message read from STDIN, to the automatic whitelist with a high score (ensuring they will be ''blacklisted''). Note that you must be running "spamassassin" or "spamd" with the -a switch. -R, --remove-from-whitelist Remove all email addresses, in the headers and body of the mail message read from STDIN, from the automatic whitelist. STDIN must con- tain a full email message, so to remove a single address you should use --remove-addr-from-whitelist instead. Note that you must be running "spamassassin" or "spamd" with the -a switch. --add-addr-to-whitelist Add the named email address to the automatic whitelist. Note that you must be running "spamassassin" or "spamd" with the -a switch. --add-addr-to-blacklist Add the named email address to the automatic whitelist with a high score (ensuring they will be ''blacklisted''). Note that you must be running "spamassassin" or "spamd" with the -a switch. --remove-addr-from-whitelist Remove the named email address from the automatic whitelist. Note that you must be running "spamassassin" or "spamd" with the -a switch. -w fromaddr, --warning-from=fromaddr This flag is only useful in conjunction with -r. It will send a reply mail to the sender of the tested mail, notifying them that their message has been trapped as spam, from the address supplied in fromaddr. See "SPAM TRAPPING". -l filename, --log-to-mbox=filename Log all mail messages that pass through the filter, to an mbox-format file named by filename. Handy for use with -r and -w. -L, --local Do only the ''local'' tests, ones that do not require an internet connection to operate. Normally, SpamAssassin will try to detect whether you are connected to the net before doing these tests anyway, but for faster checks you may wish to use this. -d, --remove-markup Remove SpamAssassin markup (the "SpamAssassin results" report, X-Spam-Status headers, etc.) from the mail message. The resulting mes- sage, which will be more or less identical to the original, pre-SpamAssassin input, will be output to stdout. (Note: the message will not be exactly identical; some headers will be reformatted due to some features of the Mail::Internet package, but the body text will be.) -C config, --config-file=config, -c config (deprecated) Read configuration from config. -p prefs, --prefs-file=prefs Read user score preferences from prefs. -D [area=n,...], --debug [area=n,...] Produce diagnostic output. The level of diagnostic output can be set for each area separately; area is the area of the code to instru- ment, and n is a positive or negative number indicating the debug level or bitmask for that area of code. For example, to produce diagnostic output on all rules that hit, use: spamassassin -D rulesrun=255 -x, --nouser-config Disable per-user configuration files. -M factory, --whitelist-factory=factory Select alternative whitelist factory.
DESCRIPTION
SpamAssassin is a mail filter to identify spam using text analysis and several internet-based realtime blacklists. Using its rule base, it uses a wide range of heuristic tests on mail headers and body text to identify "spam", also known as unsolicited commercial email. Once identified, the mail is then tagged as spam for later filtering using the user's own mail user-agent application. SpamAssassin also includes support for reporting spam messages to collaborative filtering databases, such as Vipul's Razor ( http://razor.sourceforge.net/ ). The default tagging operations that take place are detailed in "TAGGING".
CONFIGURATION FILES
The rule base, text templates, and rule description text are loaded from the configuration files. By default, configuration data is loaded from the first existing directory in: /usr/local/share/spamassassin;/usr/share/spamassas- sin;./rules;../rules The configuration data in the first existing directory in: /usr/local/etc/spamassassin;/usr/pkg/etc/spamassassin;/usr/etc/spamassas- sin;/etc/mail/spamassassin;/etc/spamassassin are used to override any values which had already been set Spamassassin will read *.cf in these directories, in alphanumeric order within each directory (similar to SysV-style startup scripts). In other words, it will read 10_misc.cf before 50_scores.cf and 20_body_tests.cf before 20_head_test.cf. Options in later files will override earlier files. The user preferences (such as scores to attach to each rule), are loaded from the file specified in the -p argument. If this is not speci- fied, ~/.spamassassin/user_prefs is used if it exists. "spamassassin" will create this file if it does not exist, using user_prefs.tem- plate as a template. This file will be looked for in /etc/spamassassin/user_prefs.template;/usr/local/share/spamassassin/user_prefs.tem- plate;/usr/share/spamassassin/user_prefs.template
TAGGING
The following two sections detail the tagging that takes place for spam messages, first of all, and for non-spam messages. Note that if you use the -t argument, all mails will be tagged as if they are spam messages. TAGGING FOR SPAM MAILS The modifications made are as follows: Subject: header The string "*****SPAM*****" is prepended to the subject, unless the "rewrite_subject 0" configuration option is given. X-Spam-Status: header A string, "Yes, hits=nn required=nn" is set in this header to reflect the filter status. X-Spam-Flag: header Set to "YES". X-Spam-Report: header for spam mails The SpamAssassin report is added to the mail header if the "report_header 1" configuration option is given. Content-Type: header Set to "text/plain", in order to defang HTML mail or other active content that could "call back" to the spammer. spam mail body text The SpamAssassin report is added to top of the mail message body, unless the "report_header 1" configuration option is given. TAGGING FOR NON-SPAM MAILS X-Spam-Status: header A string, "No, hits=nn required=nn" is set in this header to reflect the filter status.
SPAM TRAPPING
Quite often, if you've been on the internet for a while, you'll have accumulated a few old email accounts that nowadays get nothing but spam. SpamAssassin lets you set them up as aliases, as follows: spamtrap1: "| /path/to/spamassassin -r -w spamtrap1" This will add any incoming mail messages straight into spam-tracking databases, such as Vipul's Razor; send an explanatory reply message to the sender, from the spamtrap1 address; then drop the mail into the bit-bucket. The explanatory reply text is taken from the SpamAssassin configuration file, where it is stored in the "spamtrap" lines. If you want to keep a copy of the mails, use something like this: spamtrap1: "| /path/to/spamassassin -r -w spamtrap1 -l /var/spam/caught" It is suggested you familiarise yourself with how MTAs run programs specified in aliases, if you plan to do this; for one thing, spamassas- sin will not run under your user id in this case. If you are nervous about this, create a user for spamtrapping, and set up spamassassin in its .forward file.
INSTALLATION
The spamassassin command is part of the Mail::SpamAssassin Perl module. Install this as a normal Perl module, using "perl -MCPAN -e shell", or by hand.
ENVIRONMENT
No environment variables, aside from those used by perl, are required to be set.
SEE ALSO
Mail::SpamAssassin(3) Mail::SpamAssassin::Conf(3) Mail::Audit(3) Razor(3)
AUTHOR
Justin Mason <jm /at/ jmason.org>
PREREQUISITES
"Mail::Audit"
COREQUISITES
"Net::DNS" "Razor" perl v5.8.0 2003-02-25 SPAMASSASSIN(1)