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0intro(7) [plan9 man page]

INTRO(7)						 Miscellaneous Information Manual						  INTRO(7)

NAME
intro - introduction to databases DESCRIPTION
This manual section describes databases available on Plan 9 and the commands that access them. Some of them involve proprietary data that is not distributed outside Bell Laboratories. INTRO(7)

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INTRO(1)						    BSD General Commands Manual 						  INTRO(1)

NAME
intro -- introduction to general commands (tools and utilities) DESCRIPTION
Section one of the manual contains most of the commands which comprise the BSD user environment. Some of the commands included in section one are text editors, command shell interpreters, searching and sorting tools, file manipulation commands, system status commands, remote file copy commands, mail commands, compilers and compiler tools, formatted output tools, and line printer commands. All commands set a status value upon exit which may be tested to see if the command completed normally. Traditionally, the value 0 signifies successful completion of the command, while a value >0 indicates an error. Some commands attempt to describe the nature of the failure by using exit codes as defined in sysexits(3), while others simply set the status to an arbitrary value >0 (typically 1). SEE ALSO
apropos(1), man(1), intro(2), intro(3), sysexits(3), intro(4), intro(5), intro(6), intro(7), security(7), intro(8), intro(9) Tutorials in the UNIX User's Manual Supplementary Documents. HISTORY
The intro manual page appeared in Version 6 AT&T UNIX. BSD
October 21, 2001 BSD
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