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mkfile(8) [osx man page]

MKFILE(8)						      System Manager's Manual							 MKFILE(8)

NAME
mkfile - create a file SYNOPSIS
mkfile [ -nv ] size[b|k|m|g] filename ... DESCRIPTION
mkfile creates one or more files that are suitable for use as NFS-mounted swap areas. The sticky bit is set, and the file is padded with zeroes by default. Non-root users must set the sticky bit using chmod(1). The default size unit is bytes, but the following suffixes may be used to multiply by the given factor: b (512), k (1024), m (1048576), and g (1073741824). OPTIONS
-n Create an empty filename. The size is noted, but disk blocks aren't allocated until data is written to them. -v Verbose. Report the names and sizes of created files. WARNING
If a client's swap file is removed and recreated, it must be re-exported before the client will be able to access it. This action may only be done when the client is not running. SEE ALSO
chmod(2), stat(2), sticky(8) 1 September 1997 MKFILE(8)

Check Out this Related Man Page

mkfile(1M)																mkfile(1M)

NAME
mkfile - create a file SYNOPSIS
mkfile [-nv] size [g | k | b | m] filename... mkfile creates one or more files that are suitable for use as NFS-mounted swap areas, or as local swap areas. When a root user executes mkfile(), the sticky bit is set and the file is padded with zeros by default. When non-root users execute mkfile(), they must manually set the sticky bit using chmod(1). The default size is in bytes, but it can be flagged as gigabytes, kilobytes, blocks, or megabytes, with the g, k, b, or m suffixes, respectively. -n Create an empty filename. The size is noted, but disk blocks are not allocated until data is written to them. Files created with this option cannot be swapped over local UFS mounts. -v Verbose. Report the names and sizes of created files. USAGE
See largefile(5) for the description of the behavior of mkfile when encountering files greater than or equal to 2 Gbyte ( 2**31 bytes). See attributes(5) for descriptions of the following attributes: +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ | ATTRIBUTE TYPE | ATTRIBUTE VALUE | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ |Availability |SUNWcsu | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ chmod(1), swap(1M), attributes(5), largefile(5) 2 Feb 2001 mkfile(1M)
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