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footprint(1) [osx man page]

footprint(1)						    BSD General Commands Manual 					      footprint(1)

NAME
footprint -- gathers memory information about a process or set of processes. SYNOPSIS
footprint -h footprint -proc <process-name> | -pid <pid> [-proc <process-name> | -pid <pid> [...]] [-categories | -regions] [-swapped] [-graphics] [-collapseSharing] [-targetChildren] [-skipIdleExitClean] [-o <output-file-location>] [-i <input-file-location>] DESCRIPTION
footprint provides a summary number and a categorization that describe memory use that most impacts the system. footprint gathers the sum of dirty/anonymous allocations in one or more processes along with their attributable kernel resources (currently KPRVT). Shared allocations only contribute to the footprint once, regardless of the number of times that they are mapped into any number of processes. The "footprint" value represents allocations that will cause the system to page in accommodation. footprint needs to be run as root. It can target multiple processes via multiple instances of the -proc and -pid flags. OPTIONS
-categories Detailed output on a per-VM-region type level (medium detail). -regions Display all memory objects and associated regions that contribute to each category (high detail). -swapped Display swapped bytes information where applicable. -graphics Gather graphics data if available (platform dependent, not tallied into footprint total). -collapseSharing Do not group shared memory output by process. -targetChildren Gather footprint information for the set of processes launched directly or indirectly by the target processes. -skipIdleExitClean Do not gather information on any processes that are ready to be quit on memory pressure. Also applicable after the fact with -i option. OS X
June 28, 2012 OS X

Check Out this Related Man Page

STDINT(7)					       BSD Miscellaneous Information Manual						 STDINT(7)

NAME
stdint -- standard integer types SYNOPSIS
#include <stdint.h> DESCRIPTION
The <stdint.h> header provides source-portable integer types of a specific size, smallest memory footprint with a minimum size, fastest access speed with a minimum size, largest integer size, and those capable of storing pointers. The types int8_t, int16_t, int32_t, and int64_t provide a signed integer type of width 8, 16, 32, or 64 bits, respectively. The types uint8_t, uint16_t, uint32_t, and uint64_t provide an unsigned integer type of width 8, 16, 32, or 64 bits, respectively. These integer types should be used when a specific size is required. The types int_fast8_t, int_fast16_t, int_fast32_t, and int_fast64_t provide the fastest signed integer type with a width of at least 8, 16, 32, or 64 bits, respectively. The types uint_fast8_t, uint_fast16_t, uint_fast32_t, and uint_fast64_t provide the fastest unsigned integer type with a width of at least 8, 16, 32, or 64 bits, respectively. These types should be used when access speed is paramount, and when a specific size is not required. The types int_least8_t, int_least16_t, int_least32_t, and int_least64_t provide the smallest memory footprint signed integer type with a width of at least 8, 16, 32, or 64 bits, respectively. The types uint_least8_t, uint_least16_t, uint_least32_t, and uint_least64_t provide the smallest memory footprint unsigned integer type with a width of at least 8, 16, 32, or 64 bits, respectively. These types should be used when memory storage is of concern, and when a specific size is not required. The type intmax_t provides a signed integer type large enough to hold any other signed integer. The type uintmax_t provides an unsigned integer type large enough to hold any other unsigned integer. These types are generally the largest signed and unsigned integer types avail- able on a specific architecture. The type intptr_t provides a signed integer type with the ability to hold a pointer to void, that can later be converted back to a pointer to void. The type uintptr_t provides an unsigned integer type with the ability to hold a pointer to void, that can later be converted back to a pointer to void. Additionally, the <stdint.h> header defines some macros, but none of them are documented here. STANDARDS
The <stdint.h> header conforms to ISO/IEC 9899:1999 (``ISO C99'') and IEEE Std 1003.1-2001 (``POSIX.1''). HISTORY
The <stdint.h> header was first introduced in FreeBSD 5.0. BSD
September 15, 2002 BSD
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