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madvise1(2) [opendarwin man page]

UNIMPLEMENTED(2)					     Linux Programmer's Manual						  UNIMPLEMENTED(2)

NAME
afs_syscall, break, fattach, fdetach, ftime, getmsg, getpmsg, gtty, isastream, lock, madvise1, mpx, prof, profil, putmsg, putpmsg, secu- rity, stty, tuxcall, ulimit, vserver - unimplemented system calls SYNOPSIS
Unimplemented system calls. DESCRIPTION
These system calls are not implemented in the Linux kernel. RETURN VALUE
These system calls always return -1 and set errno to ENOSYS. NOTES
Note that ftime(3), profil(3), and ulimit(3) are implemented as library functions. Some system calls, like alloc_hugepages(2), free_hugepages(2), ioperm(2), iopl(2), and vm86(2) exist only on certain architectures. Some system calls, like ipc(2), create_module(2), init_module(2), and delete_module(2) exist only when the Linux kernel was built with sup- port for them. SEE ALSO
syscalls(2) COLOPHON
This page is part of release 4.15 of the Linux man-pages project. A description of the project, information about reporting bugs, and the latest version of this page, can be found at https://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/. Linux 2017-09-15 UNIMPLEMENTED(2)

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SGETMASK(2)                                                  Linux Programmer's Manual                                                 SGETMASK(2)

NAME
sgetmask, ssetmask - manipulation of signal mask (obsolete) SYNOPSIS
long sgetmask(void); long ssetmask(long newmask); Note: There are no glibc wrappers for these system calls; see NOTES. DESCRIPTION
These system calls are obsolete. Do not use them; use sigprocmask(2) instead. sgetmask() returns the signal mask of the calling process. ssetmask() sets the signal mask of the calling process to the value given in newmask. The previous signal mask is returned. The signal masks dealt with by these two system calls are plain bit masks (unlike the sigset_t used by sigprocmask(2)); use sigmask(3) to create and inspect these masks. RETURN VALUE
sgetmask() always successfully returns the signal mask. ssetmask() always succeeds, and returns the previous signal mask. ERRORS
These system calls always succeed. VERSIONS
Since Linux 3.16, support for these system calls is optional, depending on whether the kernel was built with the CONFIG_SGETMASK_SYSCALL option. CONFORMING TO
These system calls are Linux-specific. NOTES
Glibc does not provide wrappers for these obsolete system calls; in the unlikely event that you want to call them, use syscall(2). These system calls are unaware of signal numbers greater than 31 (i.e., real-time signals). These system calls do not exist on x86-64. It is not possible to block SIGSTOP or SIGKILL. SEE ALSO
sigprocmask(2), signal(7) COLOPHON
This page is part of release 4.15 of the Linux man-pages project. A description of the project, information about reporting bugs, and the latest version of this page, can be found at https://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/. Linux 2017-09-15 SGETMASK(2)
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