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akbd(4) [netbsd man page]

AKBD(4) 						   BSD Kernel Interfaces Manual 						   AKBD(4)

NAME
akbd -- Apple Desktop Bus keyboard driver for wscons SYNOPSIS
akbd* at obio? wskbd* at akbd? console ? options ALTXBUTTONS options CAPS_IS_CONTROL options FORCE_FUNCTION_KEYS DESCRIPTION
This driver provides the wscons(4) driver with support for Apple Desktop Bus keyboards. To work around the limited number of buttons found on most ADB mice, one can map key sequences to trigger mouse button events. To map Option+1, Option+2, Option+3 to mouse buttons 1, 2, and 3 respectively, add the following line to your kernel configuration file: options ALTXBUTTONS On macppc systems it is possible to tweak the keyboard driver to treat the caps lock key on an ADB keyboard as a control key. This requires special remapping because of ADB's strange emulation of a mechanically-locked key. To enable this code add the following line to your kernel configuration file: options CAPS_IS_CONTROL On macppc PowerBooks, several function keys double as "hot keys" (brightness, volume, eject) when the Fn modifier is held down. Mac OS X likes to reprogram the keyboard controller to send hot key events when Fn is not held down and send function key events when it is. To transform the non-keyboard "button" events back into function key events, place the following line in your kernel configuration file: options FORCE_FUNCTION_KEYS SUPPORTED HARDWARE
NetBSD is known to support the following ADB keyboards: o On-board keyboards on PowerBook models o Apple Standard Keyboard o Apple Keyboard II o Apple Extended Keyboard o Apple Extended Keyboard II o Apple Adjustable Keyboard o Most third-party ADB keyboards are supported SEE ALSO
adb(4), wscons(4), wskbd(4), wsconsctl(8) BUGS
The number pad on extended keyboards does not send out the proper key codes for many applications. The LEDs on extended keyboards are not functional under NetBSD. BSD
September 21, 2003 BSD

Check Out this Related Man Page

WSKBD(4)						   BSD Kernel Interfaces Manual 						  WSKBD(4)

NAME
wskbd -- generic keyboard support in wscons SYNOPSIS
wskbd* at pckbd? console ? mux 1 (standard PC keyboard) wskbd* at ukbd? console ? mux 1 (USB keyboard) wskbd* at lkkbd? console ? mux 1 (DEC LK200/400 serial keyboard) wskbd0 at akbd? console ? mux 1 (Apple ADB keyboard) wskbd0 at nextkbd? console ? mux 1 (NeXT keyboard) wskbd* at vrkiu? console ? mux 1 (NEC VR4000 series HPC keyboard) wskbd* at skbd? console ? mux 1 (keyboard of misc hpcmips handheld devices) wskbd* at btkbd? console ? mux 1 (Bluetooth keyboard) DESCRIPTION
The wskbd driver handles common tasks for keyboards within the wscons(4) framework. It is attached to the hardware specific keyboard drivers and provides their connection to ``wsdisplay'' devices and a character device interface. The common keyboard support consists of: o Mapping from keycodes (defined by the specific keyboard driver) to keysyms (hardware independent, defined in /usr/include/dev/wscons/wsksymdef.h). o Handling of ``compose'' sequences. Characters commonly not present as separate key on keyboards can be generated after either a special ``compose'' key is pressed or a ``dead accent'' character is used. o Certain translations, like turning an ``ALT'' modifier into an ``ESC'' prefix. o Automatic key repetition (``typematic''). o Parameter handling for ``keyboard bells''. o Generation of ``keyboard events'' for use by X servers. The wskbd driver provides a number of ioctl functions to control key maps and other parameters. These functions are accessible though the associated ``wsdisplay'' device as well. A complete list is in /usr/include/dev/wscons/wsconsio.h. The wsconsctl(8) utility allows to access key maps and other variables. The console locator in the configuration line refers to the device's use as input part of the operating system console. A device specifica- tion containing a positive value here will only match if the device is in use as system console. (The console device selection in early sys- tem startup is not influenced.) This way, the console device can be connected to a known wskbd device instance. Ioctls The following ioctl(2) calls are provided by the wskbd driver or by devices which use it. Their definitions are found in dev/wscons/wsconsio.h. WSKBDIO_GTYPE Get the keyboard type. WSKBDIO_COMPLEXBELL, WSKBDIO_SETBELL, WSKBDIO_GETBELL, WSKBDIO_SETDEFAULTBELL, WSKBDIO_GETDEFAULTBELL (struct wsmouse_repeat) Get and set keyboard bell settings. WSKBDIO_SETKEYREPEAT, WSKBDIO_GETKEYREPEAT, WSKBDIO_SETDEFAULTKEYREPEAT, WSKBDIO_GETDEFAULTKEYREPEAT (struct wskbd_keyrepeat_data) Get and set keyboard autorepeat settings. WSKBDIO_SETLEDS, WSKBDIO_GETLEDS (int) Get and set keyboard LED settings. WSKBDIO_GETMAP, WSKBDIO_SETMAP (struct wskbd_map_data) Get and set keyboard keymapping settings. WSKBDIO_GETENCODING, WSKBDIO_SETENCODING (kbd_t) Get and set keyboard encoding settings. WSKBDIO_GETKEYCLICK, WSKBDIO_SETKEYCLICK (int) Get and set keyboard keyclick settings. WSKBDIO_SETVERSION (int) Set the wscons_event protocol version. The default is 0 for binary compatibility. The latest version is always available as WSKBD_EVENT_VERSION, and is currently 1. All new code should use a call similar to the below to ensure the correct version is returned. int ver = WSKBD_EVENT_VERSION; if (ioctl(fd, WSKBDIO_SETVERSION, &ver) == -1) err(EXIT_FAILURE, "cannot set version"); FILES
/dev/wskbd* /usr/include/dev/wscons/wsksymdef.h /usr/include/dev/wscons/wsconsio.h. SEE ALSO
btkbd(4), pckbd(4), ukbd(4), wscons(4), wsmux(4), wsconsctl(8), wskbd(9) BSD
May 27, 2012 BSD
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