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NetBSD 6.1.5 - man page for raise_default_signal (netbsd section 3)

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RAISE_DEFAULT_SIGNAL(3) 	   BSD Library Functions Manual 	  RAISE_DEFAULT_SIGNAL(3)

NAME
     raise_default_signal -- raise the default signal handler

LIBRARY
     System Utilities Library (libutil, -lutil)

SYNOPSIS
     #include <util.h>

     int
     raise_default_signal(int sig);

DESCRIPTION
     The raise_default_signal() function raises the default signal handler for the signal sig.
     This function may be used by a user-defined signal handler router to ensure that a parent
     process receives the correct notification of a process termination by a signal.  This can be
     used to avoid a common programming mistake when terminating a process from a custom SIGINT
     or SIGQUIT signal handler.

     The operations performed are:

	   1.	Block all signals, using sigprocmask(2).

	   2.	Set the signal handler for signal sig to the default signal handler (SIG_DFL).

	   3.	raise(3) signal sig.

	   4.	Unblock signal sig to deliver it.

	   5.	Restore the original signal mask and handler, even if there was a failure.

     See signal(7) for a table of signals and default actions.

     The raise_default_signal() function should be async-signal-safe.

RETURN VALUES
     Upon successful completion, a value of 0 is returned.  Otherwise, a value of -1 is returned
     and the global variable errno is set to indicate the error.

ERRORS
     The raise_default_signal() function may fail and set errno for any of the errors specified
     for the functions sigemptyset(3), sigfillset(3), sigaddset(3), sigprocmask(2), sigaction(2),
     or raise(3).

SEE ALSO
     sigaction(2), sigprocmask(2), raise(3), signal(7)

HISTORY
     The raise_default_signal() function first appeared in NetBSD 5.0.

BSD					September 25, 2007				      BSD
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