Visit Our UNIX and Linux User Community

Linux and UNIX Man Pages

Test Your Knowledge in Computers #254
Difficulty: Easy
'Steppenwolf' was the code name given to the first Apple Computer before it was announced publicly.
True or False?
Linux & Unix Commands - Search Man Pages

man(7) [minix man page]

MAN(7)							 Miscellaneous Information Manual						    MAN(7)

NAME
man - nroff macro package for manual pages SYNOPSIS
nroff -man file ... DESCRIPTION
These macros are used to lay out reference pages for manuals. Any text argument t may be zero to six words. Quotes may be used to include blanks in a 'word'. Text can be empty, but unlike normal UNIX macros, the next line is not used. A prevailing indent distance is remembered between successive indented paragraphs, and is reset to default value upon reaching a non- indented paragraph (i.e. at .SH or .SS). FILES
/usr/lib/tmac/tmac.an For standard Minix nroff. /usr/lib/cawf/man.mac For cawf. SEE ALSO
nroff(1), man(1). REQUEST SUMMARY
Request Cause Explanation Break? .B t no Text t is bold. Quote to imbed blanks. .I t no Text t is italic. Quote to imbed blanks. .IP x yes Set prevailing indent to 5. Begin indented paragraph with hanging tag given by first argument.Tag x is always placed on a separate line. .LP yes Same as .PP. .PP yes Begin paragraph.Set prevailing indent to 5. .RE yes End of relative indent.Set prevailing indent to amount of starting .RS. .RS yes Start relative indent, move left margin in distance 5. .SH t yes Subhead. Quote to imbed blanks. .SS t yes Subsection. Quote to imbed blanks. No indent for t. .TH n s c v d yes Begin page named n of chapter s; c is the chapter name; d is the date of the most recent change; v is version number. Sets prevailing indent and tabs to 5. EXAMPLE
The following illustrates some of the requests available with this macro package: ." this is a comment .TH DEMO 1 .SH NAME demo - show how to use -man package .SH SYNOPSIS .B demo .RI [ options ] .IR file " ..." .SH DESCRIPTION This is a test for showing how to use the .BR nroff (1) man package. It shows how to use .TH, .SH, .PP, .B, .I, and .IP commands. .PP This will be a new paragraph. You can also use normal .BR nroff (1) commands in the text. .SS Nroff Commands .IP 'e"' This is the comment command. " You won't see this. .IP nf No fill mode (the normal mode is fill mode where things get justified right and left). .IP fi Re-enter fill mode. .IP br Break line here no matter what. .IP sp Vertical space (also causes a break to occur). .sp Note that to continue an indent and make a new paragraph (as is the case here), just put in a space (.sp). .PP Now we should be at a new paragraph. Executing nroff -man demo.man results in the following output: (Ignoring page headers and footers) NAME demo - show how to use -man package SYNOPSIS demo [options] file ... DESCRIPTION This is a test for showing how to use the nroff(1) man package. It shows how to use .TH, .SH, .PP, .B, .I, and .IP commands. This will be a new paragraph. You can also use normal nroff(1) commands in the text. Nroff Commands '"' This is the comment command. nf No fill mode (the normal mode is fill mode where things get justified right and left). fi Re-enter fill mode. br Break line here no matter what. sp Vertical space (also causes a break to occur). Note that to continue an indent and make a new paragraph (as is the case here), just put in a space (.sp). Now we should be at a new paragraph. CONVENTIONS
A typical manual page for a command or function is laid out as follows: .TH TITLE [1-8] The name of the command or function in upper-case, which serves as the title of the manual page. This is followed by the number of the section in which it appears. .SH NAME name - one-line summary The name, or list of names, by which the command is called, followed by a dash and then a one-line summary of the action performed. All in roman font, this sec- tion contains no troff(1) commands or escapes, and no macro requests. It is used to generate the whatis(1) database. .SH SYNOPSIS Commands: The syntax of the command and its arguments as typed on the command line. When in boldface, a word must be typed exactly as printed. When in italics, a word can be replaced with text that you supply. Syntactic symbols appear in roman face: [ ] An argument, when surrounded by brackets is optional. | Arguments separated by a vertical bar are exclusive. You can supply only item from such a list. ... Arguments followed by an elipsis can be repeated. When an elipsis follows a brack- eted set, the expression within the brackets can be repeated. Functions: If required, the data declaration, or #include directive, is shown first, followed by the func- tion declaration. Otherwise, the function declara- tion is shown. .SH DESCRIPTION A narrative description of the command or function in detail, including how it interacts with files or data, and how it handles the standard input, standard output and standard error. Filenames, and references to commands or functions described elswhere in the manual, are italicised. The names of options, variables and other literal terms are in boldface. .SH OPTIONS The list of options along with a description of how each affects the commands operation. .SH ENVIRONMENT Environment variables used. .SH FILES A list of files associated with the command or func- tion. .SH "SEE ALSO" A comma-separated list of related manual pages, followed by references to other published materials. This section contains no troff(1) escapes or commands, and no macro requests. .SH DIAGNOSTICS A list of diagnostic messages and an explanation of each. .SH NOTES Any additional notes such as installation-dependent functionality. .SH BUGS A description of limitations, known defects, and possi- ble problems associated with the command or function. .SH AUTHOR The program's author and any pertinent release info. .SH VERSION The program's current version number and release date. BUGS
Even though cawf(1) has a better chance at formatting a random manual page then the standard Minix nroff, it has two annoying bugs in its macro set. Both .PP and .IP reset the indentation level to the level set by .SH. This means that you can't use them in a piece of text indented by .RS. For .IP this is troublesome, you can see why in the unformatted source of this text. .PP can simply be replaced by .sp, or better yet, by .SP with the following macro defined somewhere in your text: .de SP .if t .sp 0.4 .if n .sp .. This will make .SP use 4/10 of a line if formatted by troff, just like .PP. MAN(7)

Featured Tech Videos