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string(3) [minix man page]

STRING(3)						     Library Functions Manual							 STRING(3)

NAME
string, strcat, strncat, strcmp, strncmp, strcpy, strncpy, strlen, index, rindex - string operations string, strcat, strncat, strcmp, strncmp, strcpy, strncpy, strlen, strchr, strrchr, strerror, memcmp, memcpy, memmove, memchr, memset, index, rindex - string operations SYNOPSIS
#include <sys/types.h> #include <strings.h> char *strcat(char *s1, const char *s2) char *strncat(char *s1, const char *s2, size_t n) int strcmp(const char *s1, const char *s2) int strncmp(const char *s1, const char *s2, size_t n) char *strcpy(char *s1, const char *s2) char *strncpy(char *s1, const char *s2, size_t n) size_t strlen(const char *s) char *strchr(const char *s, int c) char *strrchr(const char *s, int c) char *strerror(int errnum) int memcmp(const void *s1, const void *s2, size_t n) void *memcpy(void *s1, const void *s2, size_t n) void *memmove(void *s1, const void *s2, size_t n) void *memchr(const void *s, int c, size_t n) void *memset(void *s, int c, size_t n) char *index(const char *s, int c) char *rindex(const char *s, int c) DESCRIPTION
These functions operate on null-terminated strings. They do not check for overflow of any receiving string. Strcat appends a copy of string s2 to the end of string s1. Strncat copies at most n characters. Both return a pointer to the null-termi- nated result. Strcmp compares its arguments and returns an integer greater than, equal to, or less than 0, according as s1 is lexicographically greater than, equal to, or less than s2. Strncmp makes the same comparison but looks at at most n characters. Strcpy copies string s2 to s1, stopping after the null character has been moved. Strncpy copies exactly n characters, truncating or null- padding s2; the target may not be null-terminated if the length of s2 is n or more. Both return s1. Strlen returns the number of non-null characters in s. Strchr (strrchr) returns a pointer to the first (last) occurrence of character c in string s, or null if c does not occur in the string. Strerror returns the error string for the system call error errnum. See intro(2). Memcmp is like strcmp except that the strings are memory blocks of length n. Null characters are treated as ordinary characters. Memcpy copies n bytes from the location pointed to by s2 to s1. Memmove is like memcpy, except that it can handle overlap between the two strings. Both functions return s1. Memchr returns a pointer to the first occurrence of character c in string s, or null if c does not occur in the string. Memset sets n bytes to c starting at location s. It returns s. Index and rindex are obsolete versions of strchr and strrchr. New code should avoid using them. NOTES
Characters are compared as unsigned char, whether char itself is signed or not. 4th Berkeley Distribution May 15, 1985 STRING(3)

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STRING(3)						   BSD Library Functions Manual 						 STRING(3)

NAME
index, rindex, stpcpy, strcasecmp, strcat, strchr, strcmp, strcpy, strcspn, strerror, strlen, strncasecmp, strncat, strncmp, strncpy, strpbrk, strrchr, strsep, strspn, strstr, strtok -- string specific functions LIBRARY
Standard C Library (libc, -lc) SYNOPSIS
#include <strings.h> char * index(const char *s, int c); char * rindex(const char *s, int c); int strcasecmp(const char *s1, const char *s2); int strncasecmp(const char *s1, const char *s2, size_t n); #include <string.h> char * stpcpy(char *dst, const char *src); char * strcat(char *restrict s1, const char *restrict s2); char * strchr(const char *s, int c); int strcmp(const char *s1, const char *s2); char * strcpy(char *restrict s1, const char *restrict s2); size_t strcspn(const char *s1, const char *s2); char * strerror(int errnum); size_t strlen(const char *s); char * strncat(char *restrict s1, const char *restrict s2, size_t n); int strncmp(const char *s1, const char *s2, size_t n); char * strncpy(char *restrict s1, const char *restrict s2, size_t n); char * strpbrk(const char *s1, const char *s2); char * strrchr(const char *s, int c); char * strsep(char **stringp, const char *delim); size_t strspn(const char *s1, const char *s2); char * strstr(const char *s1, const char *s2); char * strtok(char *restrict s1, const char *restrict s2); DESCRIPTION
The string functions manipulate strings that are terminated by a null byte. See the specific manual pages for more information. For manipulating variable length generic objects as byte strings (without the null byte check), see bstring(3). Except as noted in their specific manual pages, the string functions do not test the destination for size limitations. SEE ALSO
bstring(3), index(3), rindex(3), stpcpy(3), strcasecmp(3), strcat(3), strchr(3), strcmp(3), strcpy(3), strcspn(3), strerror(3), strlen(3), strpbrk(3), strrchr(3), strsep(3), strspn(3), strstr(3), strtok(3) STANDARDS
The strcat(), strncat(), strchr(), strrchr(), strcmp(), strncmp(), strcpy(), strncpy(), strerror(), strlen(), strpbrk(), strspn(), strcspn(), strstr(), and strtok() functions conform to ISO/IEC 9899:1990 (``ISO C90''). BSD
December 11, 1993 BSD

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