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MYSQLMANAGER(8) 		      MySQL Database System			  MYSQLMANAGER(8)

NAME
       mysqlmanager - the MySQL Instance Manager

SYNOPSIS
       mysqlmanager [options]

DESCRIPTION
	   Important
	   MySQL Instance Manager has been deprecated and is removed in MySQL 5.5.

       mysqlmanager is the MySQL Instance Manager (IM). This program monitors and manages MySQL
       Database Server instances. MySQL Instance Manager is available for Unix-like operating
       systems, as well as Windows. It runs as a daemon that listens on a TCP/IP port. On Unix,
       it also listens on a Unix socket file.

       MySQL Instance Manager can be used in place of the mysqld_safe script to start and stop
       one or more instances of MySQL Server. Because Instance Manager can manage multiple server
       instances, it can also be used in place of the mysqld_multi script. Instance Manager
       offers these capabilities:

       o   Instance Manager can start and stop instances, and report on the status of instances.

       o   Server instances can be treated as guarded or unguarded:

	   o   When Instance Manager starts, it starts each guarded instance. If the instance
	       crashes, Instance Manager detects this and restarts it. When Instance Manager
	       stops, it stops the instance.

	   o   A nonguarded instance is not started when Instance Manager starts or monitored by
	       it. If the instance crashes after being started, Instance Manager does not restart
	       it. When Instance Manager exits, it does not stop the instance if it is running.

	   Instances are guarded by default. An instance can be designated as nonguarded by
	   including the nonguarded option in the configuration file.

       o   Instance Manager provides an interactive interface for configuring instances, so that
	   the need to edit the configuration file manually is reduced or eliminated.

       o   Instance Manager provides remote instance management. That is, it runs on the host
	   where you want to control MySQL Server instances, but you can connect to it from a
	   remote host to perform instance-management operations.

       The following sections describe MySQL Instance Manager operation in more detail.

MYSQL INSTANCE MANAGER COMMAND OPTIONS
	   Important
	   MySQL Instance Manager has been deprecated and is removed in MySQL 5.5.

       The MySQL Instance Manager supports a number of command options. For a brief listing,
       invoke mysqlmanager with the --help option. Options may be given on the command line or in
       the Instance Manager configuration file. On Windows, the standard configuration file is
       my.ini in the directory where Instance Manager is installed. On Unix, the standard file is
       /etc/my.cnf. To specify a different configuration file, start Instance Manager with the
       --defaults-file option.

       mysqlmanager supports the following options. The options for managing entries in the
       password file are described further in the section called "INSTANCE MANAGER USER AND
       PASSWORD MANAGEMENT".

       o   --help, -?

	   Display a help message and exit.

       o   --add-user

	   Add a new user (specified with the --username option) to the password file. This
	   option was added in MySQL 5.1.12.

       o   --angel-pid-file=file_name

	   The file in which the angel process records its process ID when mysqlmanager runs in
	   daemon mode (that is, when the --run-as-service option is given). The default file
	   name is mysqlmanager.angel.pid.

	   If the --angel-pid-file option is not given, the default angel PID file has the same
	   name as the PID file except that any PID file extension is replaced with an extension
	   of .angel.pid. (For example, mysqlmanager.pid becomes mysqlmanager.angel.pid.)

	   This option was added in MySQL 5.1.11.

       o   --bind-address=IP

	   The IP address to bind to.

       o   --check-password-file

	   Check the validity and consistency of the password file. This option was added in
	   MySQL 5.1.12.

       o   --clean-password-file

	   Drop all users from the password file. This option was added in MySQL 5.1.12.

       o   --debug=debug_options, -# debug_options

	   Write a debugging log. A typical debug_options string is 'd:t:o,file_name'. This
	   option was added in MySQL 5.1.10.

       o   --default-mysqld-path=path

	   The path name of the MySQL Server binary. This path name is used for all server
	   instance sections in the configuration file for which no mysqld-path option is
	   present. The default value of this option is the compiled-in path name, which depends
	   on how the MySQL distribution was configured. Example:
	   --default-mysqld-path=/usr/sbin/mysqld

       o   --defaults-file=file_name

	   Read Instance Manager and MySQL Server settings from the given file. All configuration
	   changes made by the Instance Manager will be written to this file. This must be the
	   first option on the command line if it is used, and the file must exist.

	   If this option is not given, Instance Manager uses its standard configuration file. On
	   Windows, the standard file is my.ini in the directory where Instance Manager is
	   installed. On Unix, the standard file is /etc/my.cnf.

       o   --drop-user

	   Drop a user (specified with the --username option) from the password file. This option
	   was added in MySQL 5.1.12.

       o   --edit-user

	   Change an entry for an existing user (specified with the --username option) in the
	   password file. This option was added in MySQL 5.1.12.

       o   --install

	   On Windows, install Instance Manager as a Windows service. The service name is MySQL
	   Manager.

       o   --list-users

	   List the users in the password file. This option was added in MySQL 5.1.12.

       o   --log=file_name

	   The path to the Instance Manager log file. This option has no effect unless the
	   --run-as-service option is also given. If the file name specified for the option is a
	   relative name, the log file is created under the directory from which Instance Manager
	   is started. To ensure that the file is created in a specific directory, specify it as
	   a full path name.

	   If --run-as-service is given without --log, the log file is mysqlmanager.log in the
	   data directory.

	   If --run-as-service is not given, log messages go to the standard output. To capture
	   log output, you can redirect Instance Manager output to a file:

	       mysqlmanager > im.log

       o   --monitoring-interval=seconds

	   The interval in seconds for monitoring server instances. The default value is 20
	   seconds. Instance Manager tries to connect to each monitored (guarded) instance using
	   the nonexisting MySQL_Instance_Manager user account to check whether it is
	   available/not hanging. If the result of the connection attempt indicates that the
	   instance is unavailable, Instance Manager performs several attempts to restart the
	   instance.

	   Normally, the MySQL_Instance_Manager account does not exist, so the connection
	   attempts by Instance Manager cause the monitored instance to produce messages in its
	   general query log similar to the following:

	       Access denied for user 'MySQL_Instance_M'@'localhost' >>
		   (using password: YES)

	   The nonguarded option in the appropriate server instance section disables monitoring
	   for a particular instance. If the instance dies after being started, Instance Manager
	   will not restart it. Instance Manager tries to connect to a nonguarded instance only
	   when you request the instance's status (for example, with the SHOW INSTANCES status.

	   See the section called "MYSQL SERVER INSTANCE STATUS MONITORING", for more
	   information.

       o   --mysqld-safe-compatible

	   Run in a mysqld_safe-compatible manner. For details, see the section called "STARTING
	   THE MYSQL SERVER WITH MYSQL INSTANCE MANAGER". This option was added in MySQL 5.1.12.

       o   --password=password, -p password

	   Specify the password for an entry to be added to or modified in the password file.
	   Unlike the --password/-P option for most MySQL programs, the password value is
	   required, not optional. See also the section called "INSTANCE MANAGER USER AND
	   PASSWORD MANAGEMENT". This option was added in MySQL 5.1.12.

       o   --password-file=file_name

	   The name of the file where the Instance Manager looks for users and passwords. On
	   Windows, the default is mysqlmanager.passwd in the directory where Instance Manager is
	   installed. On Unix, the default file is /etc/mysqlmanager.passwd. See also the section
	   called "INSTANCE MANAGER USER AND PASSWORD MANAGEMENT".

       o   --pid-file=file_name

	   The process ID file to use. On Windows, the default file is mysqlmanager.pid in the
	   directory where Instance Manager is installed. On Unix, the default is
	   mysqlmanager.pid in the data directory.

       o   --port=port_num

	   The port number to use when listening for TCP/IP connections from clients. The default
	   port number (assigned by IANA) is 2273.

       o   --print-defaults

	   Print the current defaults and exit. This must be the first option on the command line
	   if it is used.

       o   --print-password-line

	   Prepare an entry for the password file, print it to the standard output, and exit. You
	   can redirect the output from Instance Manager to a file to save the entry in the file.

	   Prior to MySQL 5.1.12, this option was named --passwd.

       o   --remove

	   On Windows, removes Instance Manager as a Windows service. This assumes that Instance
	   Manager has been run with --install previously.

       o   --run-as-service

	   On Unix, daemonize and start an angel process. The angel process monitors Instance
	   Manager and restarts it if it crashes. (The angel process itself is simple and
	   unlikely to crash.)

       o   --socket=path

	   On Unix, the socket file to use for incoming connections. The default file is named
	   /tmp/mysqlmanager.sock. This option has no meaning on Windows.

       o   --standalone

	   This option is used on Windows to run Instance Manager in standalone mode. You should
	   specify it when you start Instance Manager from the command line.

       o   --user=user_name

	   On Unix, the user name of the system account to use for starting and running
	   mysqlmanager. This option generates a warning and has no effect unless you start
	   mysqlmanager as root (so that it can change its effective user ID), or as the named
	   user. It is recommended that you configure mysqlmanager to run using the same account
	   used to run the mysqld server. ("User" in this context refers to a system login
	   account, not a MySQL user listed in the grant tables.)

       o   --username=user_name, -u user_name

	   Specify the user name for an entry to be added to or modified in the password file.
	   This option was added in MySQL 5.1.12.

       o   --version, -V

	   Display version information and exit.

       o   --wait-timeout=N

	   The number of seconds to wait for activity on an incoming connection before closing
	   it. The default is 28800 seconds (8 hours).

	   This option was added in MySQL 5.1.7. Before that, the timeout is 30 seconds and
	   cannot be changed.

MYSQL INSTANCE MANAGER CONFIGURATION FILES
	   Important
	   MySQL Instance Manager has been deprecated and is removed in MySQL 5.5.

       Instance Manager uses its standard configuration file unless it is started with a
       --defaults-file option that specifies a different file. On Windows, the standard file is
       my.ini in the directory where Instance Manager is installed. On Unix, the standard file is
       /etc/my.cnf.

       Instance Manager reads options for itself from the [manager] section of the configuration
       file, and options for server instances from [mysqld] or [mysqldN] sections. The [manager]
       section contains any of the options listed in the section called "MYSQL INSTANCE MANAGER
       COMMAND OPTIONS", except for those specified as having to be given as the first option on
       the command line. Here is a sample [manager] section:

	   # MySQL Instance Manager options section
	   [manager]
	   default-mysqld-path = /usr/local/mysql/libexec/mysqld
	   socket=/tmp/manager.sock
	   pid-file=/tmp/manager.pid
	   password-file = /home/cps/.mysqlmanager.passwd
	   monitoring-interval = 2
	   port = 1999
	   bind-address = 192.168.1.5

       Each [mysqld] or [mysqldN] instance section specifies options given by Instance Manager to
       a server instance at startup. These are mainly common MySQL Server options (see
       Section 5.1.3, "Server Command Options"). In addition, a [mysqldN] section can contain the
       options in the following list, which are specific to Instance Manager. These options are
       interpreted by Instance Manager itself; it does not pass them to the server when it
       attempts to start that server.

	   Warning
	   The Instance Manager-specific options must not be used in a [mysqld] section. If a
	   server is started without using Instance Manager, it will not recognize these options
	   and will fail to start properly.

       o   mysqld-path = path

	   The path name of the mysqld server binary to use for the server instance.

       o   nonguarded

	   This option disables Instance Manager monitoring functionality for the server
	   instance. By default, an instance is guarded: At Instance Manager start time, it
	   starts the instance. It also monitors the instance status and attempts to restart it
	   if it fails. At Instance Manager exit time, it stops the instance. None of these
	   things happen for nonguarded instances.

       o   shutdown-delay = seconds

	   The number of seconds Instance Manager should wait for the server instance to shut
	   down. The default value is 35 seconds. After the delay expires, Instance Manager
	   assumes that the instance is hanging and attempts to terminate it. If you use InnoDB
	   with large tables, you should increase this value.

       Here are some sample instance sections:

	   [mysqld1]
	   mysqld-path=/usr/local/mysql/libexec/mysqld
	   socket=/tmp/mysql.sock
	   port=3307
	   server_id=1
	   skip-stack-trace
	   core-file
	   log-bin
	   log-error
	   log=mylog
	   log-slow-queries
	   [mysqld2]
	   nonguarded
	   port=3308
	   server_id=2
	   mysqld-path= /home/cps/mysql/trees/mysql-5.1/sql/mysqld
	   socket     = /tmp/mysql.sock5
	   pid-file   = /tmp/hostname.pid5
	   datadir= /home/cps/mysql_data/data_dir1
	   language=/home/cps/mysql/trees/mysql-5.1/sql/share/english
	   log-bin
	   log=/tmp/fordel.log

STARTING THE MYSQL SERVER WITH MYSQL INSTANCE MANAGER
	   Important
	   MySQL Instance Manager has been deprecated and is removed in MySQL 5.5.

       This section discusses how Instance Manager starts server instances when it starts.
       However, before you start Instance Manager, you should set up a password file for it.
       Otherwise, you will not be able to connect to Instance Manager to control it after it
       starts. For details about creating Instance Manager accounts, see the section called
       "INSTANCE MANAGER USER AND PASSWORD MANAGEMENT".

       On Unix, the mysqld MySQL database server normally is started with the mysql.server
       script, which usually resides in the /etc/init.d/ folder. That script invokes the
       mysqld_safe script by default. However, you can use Instance Manager instead if you modify
       the /etc/my.cnf configuration file by adding use-manager to the [mysql.server] section:

	   [mysql.server]
	   use-manager

       Before MySQL 5.1.12, Instance Manager always tries to start at least one server instance:
       When it starts, it reads its configuration file if it exists to find server instance
       sections and prepare a list of instances. Instance sections have names of the form
       [mysqld] or [mysqldN], where N is an unsigned integer (for example, [mysqld1], [mysqld2],
       and so forth).

       After preparing the list of instances, Instance Manager starts the guarded instances in
       the list. If there are no instances, Instance Manager creates an instance named mysqld and
       attempts to start it with default (compiled-in) configuration values. This means that the
       Instance Manager cannot find the mysqld program if it is not installed in the default
       location. (Section 2.1.5, "Installation Layouts", describes default locations for
       components of MySQL distributions.) If you have installed the MySQL server in a
       nonstandard location, you should create the Instance Manager configuration file.

       The startup behavior just described is similar to that of mysqld_safe, which always
       attempts to start a server. However, it lacks the flexibility required for some operations
       because it is not possible to run Instance Manager in such a way that it refrains from
       starting any server instances. For example, you cannot invoke Instance Manager for the
       purpose of configuring an instance without also starting it (a task that a MySQL installer
       application might want to perform). Consequently, MySQL 5.1.12 introduces the following
       changes:

       o   A new option, --mysqld-safe-compatible, may be used to cause Instance Manager to run
	   with startup behavior similar to that used before MySQL 5.1.12: If Instance Manager
	   finds a [mysqld] instance section in the configuration file, it will start it. If
	   Instance Manager finds no [mysqld] section, it creates one using default configuration
	   values, writes a [mysqld] section to the configuration file if it is accessible, and
	   starts the mysqld instance. Instance Manager also starts any other guarded instances
	   listed in the configuration file.

       o   Without --mysqld-safe-compatible, Instance Manager reads its configuration file if it
	   exists and starts instances for any guarded instance sections that it finds. If there
	   are none, it starts no instances.

       Instance Manager also stops all guarded server instances when it shuts down.

       The permissible options for [mysqldN] server instance sections are described in the
       section called "MYSQL INSTANCE MANAGER CONFIGURATION FILES". In these sections, you can
       use a special mysqld-path=path-to-mysqld-binary option that is recognized only by Instance
       Manager. Use this option to let Instance Manager know where the mysqld binary resides. If
       there are multiple instances, it may also be necessary to set other options such as
       datadir and port, to ensure that each instance has a different data directory and TCP/IP
       port number.  Section 5.3, "Running Multiple MySQL Instances on One Machine", discusses
       the configuration values that must differ for each instance when you run multiple instance
       on the same machine.

	   Warning
	   The [mysqld] instance section, if it exists, must not contain any Instance
	   Manager-specific options.

       The typical Unix startup/shutdown cycle for a MySQL server with the MySQL Instance Manager
       enabled is as follows:

	1. The /etc/init.d/mysql script starts MySQL Instance Manager.

	2. Instance Manager starts the guarded server instances and monitors them.

	3. If a server instance fails, Instance Manager restarts it.

	4. If Instance Manager is shut down (for example, with the /etc/init.d/mysql stop
	   command), it shuts down all server instances.

INSTANCE MANAGER USER AND PASSWORD MANAGEMENT
	   Important
	   MySQL Instance Manager has been deprecated and is removed in MySQL 5.5.

       The Instance Manager stores its user information in a password file. On Windows, the
       default is mysqlmanager.passwd in the directory where Instance Manager is installed. On
       Unix, the default file is /etc/mysqlmanager.passwd. To specify a different location for
       the password file, use the --password-file option.

       If the password file does not exist or contains no password entries, you cannot connect to
       the Instance Manager.

	   Note
	   Any Instance Manager process that is running to monitor server instances does not
	   notice changes to the password file. You must stop it and restart it after making
	   password entry changes.

       Entries in the password file have the following format, where the two fields are the
       account user name and encrypted password, separated by a colon:

	   petr:*35110DC9B4D8140F5DE667E28C72DD2597B5C848

       Instance Manager password encryption is the same as that used by MySQL Server. It is a
       one-way operation; no means are provided for decrypting encrypted passwords.

       Instance Manager accounts differ somewhat from MySQL Server accounts:

       o   MySQL Server accounts are associated with a host name, user name, and password (see
	   Section 6.3.1, "User Names and Passwords").

       o   Instance Manager accounts are associated with a user name and password only.

       This means that a client can connect to Instance Manager with a given user name from any
       host. To limit connections so that clients can connect only from the local host, start
       Instance Manager with the --bind-address=127.0.0.1 option so that it listens only to the
       local network interface. Remote clients will not be able to connect. Local clients can
       connect like this:

	   shell> mysql -h 127.0.0.1 -P 2273

       Before MySQL 5.1.12, the only option for creating password file entries is --passwd, which
       causes Instance Manager to prompt for user name and password values and display the
       resulting entry. You can save the output in the /etc/mysqlmanager.passwd password file to
       store it. Here is an example:

	   shell> mysqlmanager --passwd >> /etc/mysqlmanager.passwd
	   Creating record for new user.
	   Enter user name: mike
	   Enter password: mikepass
	   Re-type password: mikepass

       At the prompts, enter the user name and password for the new Instance Manager user. You
       must enter the password twice. It does not echo to the screen, so double entry guards
       against entering a different password than you intend (if the two passwords do not match,
       no entry is generated).

       The preceding command causes the following line to be added to /etc/mysqlmanager.passwd:

	   mike:*BBF1F551DD9DD96A01E66EC7DDC073911BAD17BA

       Use of the --password option fails if mysqlmanager is invoked directly from an IBM 5250
       terminal. To work around this, use a command like the following from the command line to
       generate the password entry:

	   shell> mysql -B --skip-column-name \
		    -e 'SELECT CONCAT("user_name",":",PASSWORD("pass_val"));'

       The output from the command can be used an entry in the /etc/mysqlmanager.passwd file.

       Beginning with MySQL 5.1.12, the --passwd option is renamed to --print-password-line and
       there are several other options for managing user accounts from the command line. For
       example, the --username and --password options are available on the command line for
       specifying the user name and password for an account entry. You can use them to generate
       an entry with no prompting like this (type the command on a single line):

	   shell> mysqlmanager --print-password-line
		    --username=mike --password=mikepass >> /etc/mysqlmanager.passwd

       If you omit the --username or --password option, Instance Manager prompts for the required
       value.

       --print-password-line causes Instance Manager to send the resulting account entry to its
       output, which you can append to the password file. The following list describes other
       account-management options that cause Instance Manager to operate directly on the password
       file. (These options make Instance Manager scriptable for account-management purposes.)
       For operations on the password file to succeed, the file must exist and it must be
       accessible by Instance Manager. (The exception is --clean-password-file, which creates the
       file if it does not exist. Alternatively, if there is no password file, manually create it
       as an empty file and ensure that its ownership and access modes permit it to be read and
       written by Instance Manager.) The default password file is used unless you specify a
       --password-file option.

       To ensure consistent treatment of the password file, it should be owned by the system
       account that you use for running Instance Manager to manage server instances, and you
       should invoke it from that account when you use it to manage accounts in the password
       file.

       o   Create a new user:

	       mysqlmanager --add-user --username=user_name [--password=password]

	   This command adds a new entry with the given user name and password to the password
	   file. The --username (or -u) option is required.  mysqlmanager prompts for the
	   password if it is not given on the command line with the --password (or -p) option.
	   The command fails if the user already exists.

       o   Drop an existing user:

	       mysqlmanager --drop-user --username=user_name

	   This command removes the entry with the given user name from the password file. The
	   user name is required. The command fails if the user does not exist.

       o   Change the password for an existing user:

	       mysqlmanager --edit-user --username=user_name [--password=password]

	   This command changes the given user's password in the password file. The user name is
	   required.  mysqlmanager prompts for the password it is not given on the command line.
	   The command fails if the user does not exist.

       o   List existing users:

	       mysqlmanager --list-users

	   This command lists the user names of the accounts in the password file.

       o   Check the password file:

	       mysqlmanager --check-password-file

	   This command performs a consistency and validity check of the password file. The
	   command fails if there is something wrong with the file.

       o   Empty the password file:

	       mysqlmanager --clean-password-file

	   This command empties the password file, which has the effect of dropping all users
	   listed in it. The option creates the password file if it does not exist, so it can be
	   used to initialize a new password file to be used for other account-management
	   operations. Take care not to use this option to reinitialize a file containing
	   accounts that you do not want to drop.

MYSQL SERVER INSTANCE STATUS MONITORING
	   Important
	   MySQL Instance Manager has been deprecated and is removed in MySQL 5.5.

       To monitor the status of each guarded server instance, the MySQL Instance Manager attempts
       to connect to the instance at regular intervals using the MySQL_Instance_Manager@localhost
       user account with a password of check_connection.

       You are not required to create this account for MySQL Server; in fact, it is expected that
       it will not exist. Instance Manager can tell that a server is operational if the server
       accepts the connection attempt but refuses access for the account by returning a login
       error. However, these failed connection attempts are logged by the server to its general
       query log (see Section 5.2.3, "The General Query Log").

       Instance Manager also attempts a connection to nonguarded server instances when you use
       the SHOW INSTANCES or SHOW INSTANCE STATUS command. This is the only status monitoring
       done for nonguarded instances.

       Instance Manager knows if a server instance fails at startup because it receives a status
       from the attempt. For an instance that starts but later crashes, Instance Manager receives
       a signal because it is the parent process of the instance.

       Beginning with MySQL 5.1.12, Instance Manager tracks instance states so that it can
       determine which commands are permitted for each instance. For example, commands that
       modify an instance's configuration are permitted only while the instance is offline.

       Each instance is in one of the states described in the following table. Guarded instances
       can be in any of the states. Nonguarded instances can only be offline or online. Instance
       state information is displayed in the status column of the SHOW INSTANCES and SHOW
       INSTANCE STATUS commands.

       +----------+----------------------------------+
       |State	  | Meaning			     |
       +----------+----------------------------------+
       |offline   | The instance has not been	     |
       |	  | started and is not running.      |
       +----------+----------------------------------+
       |starting  | The instance is starting	     |
       |	  | (initializing). Nonguarded	     |
       |	  | instances cannot be 	     |
       |	  |		    in this state. A |
       |	  | nonguarded instance goes	     |
       |	  | directly from		     |
       |	  |		    offline to	     |
       |	  | online.			     |
       +----------+----------------------------------+
       |stopping  | The instance is stopping.	     |
       |	  | Nonguarded instances cannot be   |
       |	  | in this state.		     |
       |	  |		    A nonguarded     |
       |	  | instance goes directly from      |
       |	  | online to			     |
       |	  |		    offline, or      |
       |	  | stays offline if startup fails.  |
       +----------+----------------------------------+
       |online	  | The instance has started and is  |
       |	  | running.			     |
       +----------+----------------------------------+
       |failed	  | The instance was online but it   |
       |	  | crashed and is being restarted   |
       |	  | by				     |
       |	  |		    Instance	     |
       |	  | Manager, or else the instance    |
       |	  | failed to start		     |
       |	  |		    at all and	     |
       |	  | Instance Manager is again	     |
       |	  | attempting to start 	     |
       |	  |		    it. Nonguarded   |
       |	  | instances cannot be in this      |
       |	  | state.			     |
       +----------+----------------------------------+
       |crashed   | Instance Manager failed to start |
       |	  | the instance after several	     |
       |	  | attempts.			     |
       |	  |		    (Instance	     |
       |	  | Manager will try again later.)   |
       |	  | Nonguarded			     |
       |	  |		    instances cannot |
       |	  | be in this state.		     |
       +----------+----------------------------------+
       |abandoned | Instance Manager was not able to |
       |	  | start the instance, has given    |
       |	  | up, and			     |
       |	  |		    will make no     |
       |	  | further attempts until	     |
       |	  | instructed			     |
       |	  |		    otherwise. To    |
       |	  | tell Instance Manager to try     |
       |	  | again, you			     |
       |	  |		    must first use   |
       |	  | STOP INSTANCE to put	     |
       |	  |		    the instance in  |
       |	  | offline state, and then use      |
       |	  |		    START INSTANCE   |
       |	  | to start the instance.	     |
       |	  |		    If it is	     |
       |	  | necessary to make configuration  |
       |	  | changes for the		     |
       |	  |		    instance, you    |
       |	  | must do so after putting the     |
       |	  | instance			     |
       |	  |		    offline and      |
       |	  | before starting it. (Instance    |
       |	  | Manager			     |
       |	  |		    accepts	     |
       |	  | configuration-changing commands  |
       |	  | only for offline		     |
       |	  |		    instances.)      |
       |	  | Nonguarded instances cannot be   |
       |	  | in this			     |
       |	  |		    state.	     |
       +----------+----------------------------------+

CONNECTING TO MYSQL INSTANCE MANAGER
	   Important
	   MySQL Instance Manager has been deprecated and is removed in MySQL 5.5.

       After you set up a password file for the MySQL Instance Manager and Instance Manager is
       running, you can connect to it. The MySQL client/server protocol is used to communicate
       with the Instance Manager. For example, you can connect to it using the standard mysql
       client program:

	   shell> mysql --port=2273 --host=im.example.org --user=mysql --password

       Instance Manager supports the version of the MySQL client/server protocol used by the
       client tools and libraries distributed with MySQL 4.1 or later, so other programs that use
       the MySQL C API also can connect to it.

MYSQL INSTANCE MANAGER COMMANDS
	   Important
	   MySQL Instance Manager has been deprecated and is removed in MySQL 5.5.

       After you connect to MySQL Instance Manager, you can issue commands. The following general
       principles apply to Instance Manager command execution:

       o   Commands that take an instance name fail if the name is not a valid instance name.

       o   Commands that take an instance name (other than CREATE INSTANCE) fail if the instance
	   does not exist.

       o   As of MySQL 5.1.12, commands for an instance require that the instance be in an
	   appropriate state. You cannot configure or start an instance that is not offline. You
	   cannot start an instance that is online.

       o   Instance Manager maintains information about instance configuration in an internal
	   (in-memory) cache. Initially, this information comes from the configuration file if it
	   exists, but some commands change the configuration of an instance. Commands that
	   modify the configuration file fail if the file does not exist or is not accessible to
	   Instance Manager.

	   As of MySQL 5.1.12, configuration-changing commands modify both the in-memory cache
	   and the server instance section recorded in the configuration file to maintain
	   consistency between them. For this to occur, the instance must be offline and the
	   configuration file must be accessible and not malformed. If the configuration file
	   cannot be updated, the command fails and the cache remains unchanged.

       o   On Windows, the standard file is my.ini in the directory where Instance Manager is
	   installed. On Unix, the standard configuration file is /etc/my.cnf. To specify a
	   different configuration file, start Instance Manager with the --defaults-file option.

       o   If a [mysqld] instance section exists in the configuration file, it must not contain
	   any Instance Manager-specific options (see the section called "MYSQL INSTANCE MANAGER
	   CONFIGURATION FILES"). Therefore, you must not add any of these options if you change
	   the configuration for an instance named mysqld.

       The following list describes the commands that Instance Manager accepts, with examples.

       o   CREATE INSTANCE instance_name [option_name[=option_value], ...]

	   This command configures a new instance by creating an [instance_name] section in the
	   configuration file. The command fails if instance_name is not a valid instance name or
	   the instance already exists.

	   The created section instance is empty if no options are given. Otherwise, the options
	   are added to the section. Options should be given in the same format used when you
	   write options in option files. (See Section 4.2.3.3, "Using Option Files" for a
	   description of the permissible syntax.) If you specify multiple options, separate them
	   by commas.

	   For example, to create an instance section named [mysqld98], you might write something
	   like this were you to modify the configuration file directly:

	       [mysqld98]
	       basedir=/var/mysql98

	   To achieve the same effect using CREATE INSTANCE, issue this command to Instance
	   Manager:

	       mysql> CREATE INSTANCE mysqld98 basedir="/var/mysql98";
	       Query OK, 0 rows affected (0,00 sec)

	   CREATE INSTANCE creates the instance but does not start it.

	   If the instance name is the (deprecated) name mysqld, the option list cannot include
	   any options that are specific to Instance Manager, such as nonguarded (see the section
	   called "MYSQL INSTANCE MANAGER CONFIGURATION FILES").

	   This command was added in MySQL 5.1.12.

       o   DROP INSTANCE instance_name

	   This command removes the configuration for instance_name from the configuration file.

	       mysql> DROP INSTANCE mysqld98;
	       Query OK, 0 rows affected (0,00 sec)

	   The command fails if instance_name is not a valid instance name, the instance does not
	   exist, or is not offline.

	   This command was added in MySQL 5.1.12.

       o   START INSTANCE instance_name

	   This command attempts to start an offline instance. The command is asynchronous; it
	   does not wait for the instance to start.

	       mysql> START INSTANCE mysqld4;
	       Query OK, 0 rows affected (0,00 sec)

       o   STOP INSTANCE instance_name

	   This command attempts to stop an instance. The command is synchronous; it waits for
	   the instance to stop.

	       mysql> STOP INSTANCE mysqld4;
	       Query OK, 0 rows affected (0,00 sec)

       o   SHOW INSTANCES

	   Shows the names and status of all loaded instances.

	       mysql> SHOW INSTANCES;
	       +---------------+---------+
	       | instance_name | status  |
	       +---------------+---------+
	       | mysqld3       | offline |
	       | mysqld4       | online  |
	       | mysqld2       | offline |
	       +---------------+---------+

       o   SHOW INSTANCE STATUS instance_name

	   Shows status and version information for an instance.

	       mysql> SHOW INSTANCE STATUS mysqld3;
	       +---------------+--------+---------+
	       | instance_name | status | version |
	       +---------------+--------+---------+
	       | mysqld3       | online | unknown |
	       +---------------+--------+---------+

       o   SHOW INSTANCE OPTIONS instance_name

	   Shows the options used by an instance.

	       mysql> SHOW INSTANCE OPTIONS mysqld3;
	       +---------------+---------------------------------------------------+
	       | option_name   | value						   |
	       +---------------+---------------------------------------------------+
	       | instance_name | mysqld3					   |
	       | mysqld-path   | /home/cps/mysql/trees/mysql-4.1/sql/mysqld	   |
	       | port	       | 3309						   |
	       | socket        | /tmp/mysql.sock3				   |
	       | pid-file      | hostname.pid3					   |
	       | datadir       | /home/cps/mysql_data/data_dir1/		   |
	       | language      | /home/cps/mysql/trees/mysql-4.1/sql/share/english |
	       +---------------+---------------------------------------------------+

       o   SHOW instance_name LOG FILES

	   The command lists all log files used by the instance. The result set contains the path
	   to the log file and the log file size. If no log file path is specified in the
	   instance section of the configuration file (for example, log=/var/mysql.log), the
	   Instance Manager tries to guess its placement. If Instance Manager is unable to guess
	   the log file placement you should specify the log file location explicitly by using a
	   log option in the appropriate instance section of the configuration file.

	       mysql> SHOW mysqld LOG FILES;
	       +-------------+------------------------------------+----------+
	       | Logfile     | Path				  | Filesize |
	       +-------------+------------------------------------+----------+
	       | ERROR LOG   | /home/cps/var/mysql/owlet.err	  | 9186     |
	       | GENERAL LOG | /home/cps/var/mysql/owlet.log	  | 471503   |
	       | SLOW LOG    | /home/cps/var/mysql/owlet-slow.log | 4463     |
	       +-------------+------------------------------------+----------+

	   SHOW ... LOG FILES displays information only about log files. If a server instance
	   uses log tables (see Section 5.2.1, "Selecting General Query and Slow Query Log Output
	   Destinations"), no information about those tables is shown.

	   Log options are described in Section 5.1.3, "Server Command Options".

       o   SHOW instance_name LOG {ERROR | SLOW | GENERAL} size[,offset_from_end]

	   This command retrieves a portion of the specified log file. Because most users are
	   interested in the latest log messages, the size parameter defines the number of bytes
	   to retrieve from the end of the log. To retrieve data from the middle of the log file,
	   specify the optional offset_from_end parameter. The following example retrieves 21
	   bytes of data, starting 23 bytes before the end of the log file and ending 2 bytes
	   before the end:

	       mysql> SHOW mysqld LOG GENERAL 21, 2;
	       +---------------------+
	       | Log		     |
	       +---------------------+
	       | using password: YES |
	       +---------------------+

       o   SET instance_name.option_name[=option_value]

	   This command edits the specified instance's configuration section to change or add
	   instance options. The option is added to the section is it is not already present.
	   Otherwise, the new setting replaces the existing one.

	       mysql> SET mysqld2.port=3322;
	       Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

	   As of MySQL 5.1.12, you can specify multiple options (separated by commas), and SET
	   can be used only for offline instances. Each option must indicate the instance name:

	       mysql> SET mysqld2.port=3322, mysqld3.nonguarded;
	       Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

	   Before MySQL 5.1.12, only a single option can be specified. Also, changes made to the
	   configuration file do not take effect until the MySQL server is restarted. In
	   addition, these changes are not stored in the instance manager's local cache of
	   instance settings until a FLUSH INSTANCES command is executed.

       o   UNSET instance_name.option_name

	   This command removes an option from an instance's configuration section.

	       mysql> UNSET mysqld2.port;
	       Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

	   As of MySQL 5.1.12, you can specify multiple options (separated by commas), and UNSET
	   can be used only for offline instances. Each option must indicate the instance name:

	       mysql> UNSET mysqld2.port, mysqld4.nonguarded;
	       Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

	   Before MySQL 5.1.12, only a single option can be specified. Also, changes made to the
	   configuration file do not take effect until the MySQL server is restarted. In
	   addition, these changes are not stored in the instance manager's local cache of
	   instance settings until a FLUSH INSTANCES command is executed.

       o   FLUSH INSTANCES

	   As of MySQL 5.1.12, FLUSH INSTANCES cannot be used unless all instances are offline.
	   The command causes Instance Manager to reread the configuration file, update its
	   in-memory configuration cache, and start any guarded instances.

	   Before MySQL 5.1.12, this command forces Instance Manager reread the configuration
	   file and to refresh internal structures. This command should be performed after
	   editing the configuration file. The command does not restart instances.

	       mysql> FLUSH INSTANCES;
	       Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.04 sec)

COPYRIGHT
       Copyright (C) 1997, 2013, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

       This software and related documentation are provided under a license agreement containing
       restrictions on use and disclosure and are protected by intellectual property laws. Except
       as expressly permitted in your license agreement or allowed by law, you may not use, copy,
       reproduce, translate, broadcast, modify, license, transmit, distribute, exhibit, perform,
       publish, or display any part, in any form, or by any means. Reverse engineering,
       disassembly, or decompilation of this software, unless required by law for
       interoperability, is prohibited.

       The information contained herein is subject to change without notice and is not warranted
       to be error-free. If you find any errors, please report them to us in writing.

       If this software or related documentation is delivered to the U.S. Government or anyone
       licensing it on behalf of the U.S. Government, the following notice is applicable:

       U.S. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS Programs, software, databases, and related documentation and
       technical data delivered to U.S. Government customers are "commercial computer software"
       or "commercial technical data" pursuant to the applicable Federal Acquisition Regulation
       and agency-specific supplemental regulations. As such, the use, duplication, disclosure,
       modification, and adaptation shall be subject to the restrictions and license terms set
       forth in the applicable Government contract, and, to the extent applicable by the terms of
       the Government contract, the additional rights set forth in FAR 52.227-19, Commercial
       Computer Software License (December 2007). Oracle USA, Inc., 500 Oracle Parkway, Redwood
       City, CA 94065.

       This software is developed for general use in a variety of information management
       applications. It is not developed or intended for use in any inherently dangerous
       applications, including applications which may create a risk of personal injury. If you
       use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall be responsible to take all
       appropriate fail-safe, backup, redundancy, and other measures to ensure the safe use of
       this software. Oracle Corporation and its affiliates disclaim any liability for any
       damages caused by use of this software in dangerous applications.

       Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates. MySQL is a
       trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates, and shall not be used without
       Oracle's express written authorization. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
       owners.

       This software and documentation may provide access to or information on content, products,
       and services from third parties. Oracle Corporation and its affiliates are not responsible
       for and expressly disclaim all warranties of any kind with respect to third-party content,
       products, and services. Oracle Corporation and its affiliates will not be responsible for
       any loss, costs, or damages incurred due to your access to or use of third-party content,
       products, or services.

       This document in any form, software or printed matter, contains proprietary information
       that is the exclusive property of Oracle. Your access to and use of this material is
       subject to the terms and conditions of your Oracle Software License and Service Agreement,
       which has been executed and with which you agree to comply. This document and information
       contained herein may not be disclosed, copied, reproduced, or distributed to anyone
       outside Oracle without prior written consent of Oracle or as specifically provided below.
       This document is not part of your license agreement nor can it be incorporated into any
       contractual agreement with Oracle or its subsidiaries or affiliates.

       This documentation is NOT distributed under a GPL license. Use of this documentation is
       subject to the following terms:

       You may create a printed copy of this documentation solely for your own personal use.
       Conversion to other formats is allowed as long as the actual content is not altered or
       edited in any way. You shall not publish or distribute this documentation in any form or
       on any media, except if you distribute the documentation in a manner similar to how Oracle
       disseminates it (that is, electronically for download on a Web site with the software) or
       on a CD-ROM or similar medium, provided however that the documentation is disseminated
       together with the software on the same medium. Any other use, such as any dissemination of
       printed copies or use of this documentation, in whole or in part, in another publication,
       requires the prior written consent from an authorized representative of Oracle. Oracle
       and/or its affiliates reserve any and all rights to this documentation not expressly
       granted above.

       For more information on the terms of this license, or for details on how the MySQL
       documentation is built and produced, please visit MySQL Contact & Questions.

       For additional licensing information, including licenses for third-party libraries used by
       MySQL products, see Preface and Legal Notices.

       For help with using MySQL, please visit either the MySQL Forums or MySQL Mailing Lists
       where you can discuss your issues with other MySQL users.

       For additional documentation on MySQL products, including translations of the
       documentation into other languages, and downloadable versions in variety of formats,
       including HTML and PDF formats, see the MySQL Documentation Library.

SEE ALSO
       For more information, please refer to the MySQL Reference Manual, which may already be
       installed locally and which is also available online at http://dev.mysql.com/doc/.

AUTHOR
       Oracle Corporation (http://dev.mysql.com/).

MySQL 5.1				    03/05/2013				  MYSQLMANAGER(8)
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