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protocols(5) [linux man page]

PROTOCOLS(5)						     Linux Programmer's Manual						      PROTOCOLS(5)

NAME
protocols - the protocols definition file DESCRIPTION
This file is a plain ASCII file, describing the various DARPA internet protocols that are available from the TCP/IP subsystem. It should be consulted instead of using the numbers in the ARPA include files, or, even worse, just guessing them. These numbers will occur in the protocol field of any IP header. Keep this file untouched since changes would result in incorrect IP packages. Protocol numbers and names are specified by the IANA (Inter- net Assigned Numbers Authority). Each line is of the following format: protocol number aliases ... where the fields are delimited by spaces or tabs. Empty lines are ignored. If a line contains a hash mark (#), the hash mark and the part of the line following it are ignored. The field descriptions are: protocol the native name for the protocol. For example ip, tcp, or udp. number the official number for this protocol as it will appear within the IP header. aliases optional aliases for the protocol. This file might be distributed over a network using a network-wide naming service like Yellow Pages/NIS or BIND/Hesiod. FILES
/etc/protocols The protocols definition file. SEE ALSO
getprotoent(3) http://www.iana.org/assignments/protocol-numbers COLOPHON
This page is part of release 3.27 of the Linux man-pages project. A description of the project, and information about reporting bugs, can be found at http://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/. Linux 2008-09-23 PROTOCOLS(5)

Check Out this Related Man Page

PROTOCOLS(5)                                                 Linux Programmer's Manual                                                PROTOCOLS(5)

NAME
protocols - protocols definition file DESCRIPTION
This file is a plain ASCII file, describing the various DARPA internet protocols that are available from the TCP/IP subsystem. It should be consulted instead of using the numbers in the ARPA include files, or, even worse, just guessing them. These numbers will occur in the protocol field of any IP header. Keep this file untouched since changes would result in incorrect IP packages. Protocol numbers and names are specified by the IANA (Inter- net Assigned Numbers Authority). Each line is of the following format: protocol number aliases ... where the fields are delimited by spaces or tabs. Empty lines are ignored. If a line contains a hash mark (#), the hash mark and the part of the line following it are ignored. The field descriptions are: protocol the native name for the protocol. For example ip, tcp, or udp. number the official number for this protocol as it will appear within the IP header. aliases optional aliases for the protocol. This file might be distributed over a network using a network-wide naming service like Yellow Pages/NIS or BIND/Hesiod. FILES
/etc/protocols The protocols definition file. SEE ALSO
getprotoent(3) <http://www.iana.org/assignments/protocol-numbers> COLOPHON
This page is part of release 4.15 of the Linux man-pages project. A description of the project, information about reporting bugs, and the latest version of this page, can be found at https://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/. Linux 2012-08-05 PROTOCOLS(5)

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