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monitorix.conf(5)		   Monitorix configuration file 		monitorix.conf(5)

NAME
       monitorix.conf - Configuration file for Monitorix.

SYNOPSIS
       Monitorix  is  a free, open source, lightweight system monitoring tool designed to monitor
       as many services and system resources as possible. It has been created to be used on  pro-
       duction	UNIX/Linux  servers, but due to its simplicity and small size may also be used to
       monitor embedded devices as well.

       It consists mainly of two programs: a collector, called monitorix, which is a Perl  daemon
       that is started automatically like any other system service, and a CGI script called moni-
       torix.cgi.

       Every time monitorix is started it reads the configuration file from the path specified in
       the  command  line (using the -c option), and once checked, it creates the index.html file
       that will act as the Monitorix main page.

       It also creates a file  called  $BASE_DIR/cgi-bin/monitorix.conf.path  that  includes  the
       absolute path of the configuration file. This file will be read by monitorix.cgi to deter-
       mine the exact location of the configuration file. If for  any  reason  it  is  unable  to
       locate  this  file,  Monitorix  will  try two alternate locations: /etc/monitorix.conf and
       /usr/local/etc/monitorix.conf.

DESCRIPTION
       The configuration file is a Perl file where values are directly assigned to variables that
       Monitorix uses during normal operation; you should take care to conform to basic Perl syn-
       tax.

CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
       Because this file follows the Perl syntax, you will find different type of options (scalar
       or  normal  variables,  arrays  and associative arrays), each one prefixed with $, @ and %
       respectively. This is important to keep in mind as the prefix symbols indicate  what  type
       of values each option accepts.

       Remember to enclose all values with double quotes.

       TITLE
	      A description of the server, where it is located, the Company name, etc.

	      Default value: Place a Title Here

       HOSTNAME
	      The name of the host.

	      Default value: none

       THEME_COLOR
	      RRDtool  comes  with  a default white theme, and since Monitorix introduces its own
	      black theme, you have two predefined themes to choose from.

	      Default value: black

       REFRESH_RATE
	      The refresh rate (in seconds) of the statistics web page displayed in your browser.
	      If set to 0, page refreshing is disabled.

	      Default value: 150

       IFACE_MODE
	      The  interface mode defines the manner in which data is shown in the browser. Since
	      version 1.4.0 it has been possible to display the graphic  data  using  plain  text
	      tables.  This  allows Monitorix to be used by those running screen reader software,
	      and also simplifies automatic data processing through scripts.

	      The possible values are:
		     graph  for rendered graphs
		     text   for plain text representation

	      Default value: graph

       ENABLE_ZOOM
	      Zoom allows double clicking any graph in order to see a larger version (zoomed in).
	      This is especially useful for seeing additional detail.

	      Default value: Y

       NETSTATS_IN_BPS
	      This option toggles network values between bits and bytes per second.

	      Default value: N

       DISABLE_JAVASCRIPT_VOID
	      This  option  enables  or disables the use of use javascript:void-URLs when opening
	      windows with zoomed graphs. Some people likes to open links in  the  background  by
	      pressing	the middle mouse button in Firefox, and with the default javascript:void-
	      URLs the only they get is an empty window with nothing in it.

	      Default value: N

       BASE_DIR
	      This is the absolute path to the directory where all the web elements are located:

		     cgi-bin/	       monitorix.cgi script directory
		     imgs/	       .png graph images directory
		     index.html        Monitorix main page
		     logo_bot.png      Monitorix bottom logo
		     logo_top.png      Monitorix top logo
		     monitorixico.png  Monitorix favicon logo

	      Default value: /usr/share/monitorix/
	      (depends on the operating system)

       BASE_LIB
	      This is the absolute path to the directory where all of the monthly reports,  daily
	      traffic usage, and RRD files are located:

		     reports/	       monthly reports localization directory
		     usage/	       daily traffic usage data directory
		     *.rrd	       RRD files

	      Default value: /var/lib/monitorix/
	      (depends on the operating system)

       BASE_URL
	      This  is	the URL prefix that Monitorix utilizes when refering to its own pages and
	      files.

	      Default value: /monitorix

       BASE_CGI
	      This is the URL prefix that Monitorix utilizes when refering to monitorix.cgi.

	      Default value: /monitorix-cgi

       LOG_FILE
	      This is the path to the Monitorix log file. Please check this file periodically and
	      especially after every update to confirm proper operation.

	      Default value: /var/log/monitorix

       SECURE_LOG
	      This is the path to the system log (also known as secure, auth.log, etc.) Monitorix
	      uses this file to report SSH, POP3, FTP and Telnet successful logins.

	      Default value: /var/log/secure

       MAIL_LOG
	      This is the path to the mail log file. Monitorix uses this file to report  messages
	      sent  (supporting Sendmail and Postfix formats), and the MailScanner log format for
	      spam-mail and virus-mail alerts.

	      Default value: /var/log/maillog

       MILTER_GL
	      This is the path to the dump file of milter-greylist.

	      Default value: /var/lib/milter-greylist/db/greylist.db

       IMAP_LOG
	      This is the path to the IMAP (Dovecot or UW-IMAP) log  file.  Monitorix  uses  this
	      file to report IMAP and POP3 successful logins.

	      Default value: /var/log/imap

       HYLAFAX_LOG
	      This  is	the path to the Hylafax log file. Monitorix uses this file to report suc-
	      cessful FAX dispatches.

	      Default value: /var/spool/hylafax/etc/xferfaxlog

       CUPS_LOG
	      This is the path to the CUPS page log file. Monitorix uses this file to  report  on
	      print jobs.

	      Default value: /var/log/cups/page_log

       FAIL2BAN_LOG
	      This  is	the  path to the Fail2ban log file. Monitorix uses this file to report IP
	      addresses banned.

	      Default value: /var/log/fail2ban.log

       SPAMASSASSIN_LOG
	      This is the path to the Spamassassin log file. Monitorix uses this file  to  report
	      spam-mail alerts.

	      Default value: /var/log/maillog

       CLAMAV_LOG
	      This  is the path to the Clamav log file. Monitorix uses this file to report virus-
	      mail alerts.

	      Default value: /var/log/clamav/clamav.log

       CG_LOGDIR
	      This is the path to the CommuniGate logs directory. Monitorix uses these	files  to
	      report  the  number  of mail messages successfully received and sent, and to report
	      IMAP and POP3 successful logins.

	      Default value: /var/CommuniGate/SystemLogs/

       SQUID_LOG
	      This is the path to the Squid log file. Monitorix uses this file to report on Squid
	      Proxy requests.

	      Default value: /var/log/squid/access.log

       IMAP_DATE_LOG_FORMAT
	      This is the Dovecot date format as it appears in the IMAP_LOG file.

	      Default value: %b %d

       ENABLE_ALERTS
	      This  enables  or disables the alert capabilities that were introduced in Monitorix
	      version 1.4.0. Only two alerts are currently implemented; one for the  average  CPU
	      load and one for the root filesystem disk use. They work as follows:

	      The CPU load average uses the third value (the one that represents the last 15 min-
	      utes of load average), and if it reaches the ALERT_LOADAVG_THRESHOLD value for  the
	      interval	of  time  defined  in ALERT_LOADAVG_TIMEINTVL, Monitorix will execute the
	      external alert script defined in ALERT_LOADAVG_SCRIPT.

	      For the root filesystem disk use, if the percentage of disk space used reaches  the
	      ALERT_ROOTFS_THRESHOLD	value	 for	the   interval	 of   time   defined   in
	      ALERT_ROOTFS_TIMEINTVL, Monitorix will execute the external alert script defined in
	      ALERT_ROOTFS_SCRIPT.

	      The  default  Monitorix  installation includes an example alert shell-script called
	      monitorix-alert.sh which you can use as a base for your own script.

	      Default value: N

       ALERT_LOADAVG_TIMEINTVL
	      This is the period of time (in seconds) that the threshold  needs  to  be  exceeded
	      before the external alert script is executed.

	      Default value: 3600

       ALERT_LOADAVG_THRESHOLD
	      This  is	the  value that needs to be reached or exceeded within the specified time
	      period in ALERT_LOADAVG_TIMEINTVL to trigger the mechanism for a particular action,
	      which in this case is the execution of an external alert script.

	      The  value of this option is compared against the last 15 minutes of CPU load aver-
	      age.

	      Default value: 5.0

       ALERT_LOADAVG_SCRIPT
	      This is the full path name of the script that will be executed by this alert.

	      It will receive the following three parameters:

	      1st - the value currently defined in ALERT_LOADAVG_TIMEINTVL
	      2nd - the value currently defined in ALERT_LOADAVG_THRESHOLD
	      3rd - the current 15min CPU load average

	      Default value: /path/to/script.sh

       ALERT_ROOTFS_TIMEINTVL
	      This is the period of time (in seconds) that the threshold  needs  to  be  exceeded
	      before the external alert script is executed.

	      Default value: 3600

       ALERT_ROOTFS_THRESHOLD
	      This  is	the  value that needs to be reached or exceeded within the specified time
	      period in ALERT_ROOTFS_TIMEINTVL to trigger the mechanism for a particular  action,
	      which in this case is the execution of an external alert script.

	      The value of this option is compared to the current root filesystem disk usage.

	      Default value: 100

       ALERT_ROOTFS_SCRIPT
	      This is the full path name of the script that will be executed by this alert.

	      It will receive the following three parameters:

	      1st - the value currently defined in ALERT_ROOTFS_TIMEINTVL
	      2nd - the value currently defined in ALERT_ROOTFS_THRESHOLD
	      3rd - the current root filesystem disk usage

	      Default value: /path/to/script.sh

       GRAPH_ENABLE
	      This  enables  or  disables  the monitoring of each graph. Placing a Y on a desired
	      graph and restarting Monitorix will automatically create	the  RRD  file	for  that
	      graph and start gathering information according to its settings.

   System load average and usage (system.rrd)
       Only the limit and rigid values may be set here.

   Global kernel usage (kern.rrd)
       KERN_GRAPH_MODE
	      This  changes the layout of the kernel usage graph, the possible values are R for a
	      real graph, or S for a stacked graph (every line or area is stacked on top  of  the
	      previous element).

	      Default value: R

       KERN_DATA
	      This  is the list of values offered in modern Linux kernels. Older Linux kernels or
	      other Operating Systems may not have all of them. Placing a Y or an N  will  enable
	      or disable the value in the graph.

   Kernel usage per processor (proc.rrd)
       PROC_MAX
	      This  is the number of processors or cores that your system has. There is no limit,
	      however keep in mind that every time this number is changed Monitorix  will  resize
	      the proc.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

	      Default value: 4

       PROC_PER_ROW
	      This  is	the  number  of  processor graphs that will be put in a row. Consider the
	      interaction of this parameter with the PROC_SIZE and PROC_DATA options  (below)  in
	      order to adjust the size and number of graphs in relation to your horizontal screen
	      size.

	      Default value: 2

       PROC_SIZE
	      This option sets the size of all processors graphs.

	      The possible values are:
		     main     for 450x150 graphs
		     medium   for 325x150 graphs
		     medium2  for 325x70 graphs
		     small    for 200x66 graphs
		     mini     for 183x66 graphs
		     tiny     for 110x40 graphs

	      Default value: medium

       PROC_DATA
	      This option will completely enable or disable the legend in the processor graphs.

	      Default value: Y

   HP ProLiant System Health (hptemp.rrd)
       HPTEMP_1
       HPTEMP_2
       HPTEMP_3
	      These arrays will hold the defined temperature sensors for  each	graph.	You  must
	      have  installed  the  latest  version  of  hplog that comes with HP ProLiant System
	      Health Application and Command Line Utilities.

	      Each graph has a limited number of IDs:

	      HPTEMP_1 up to 8 IDs
	      HPTEMP_2 up to 6 IDs
	      HPTEMP_3 up to 6 IDs

	      The following is a configuration example of selected IDs:

	      # hplog -t
	      ID     TYPE	 LOCATION      STATUS	 CURRENT  THRESHOLD
	       1  Basic Sensor Ambient	       Normal	 75F/ 24C 107F/ 42C
	       2  Basic Sensor CPU (1)	       Normal	104F/ 40C 179F/ 82C
	       3  Basic Sensor CPU (2)	       Normal	---F/---C 179F/ 82C
	       4  Basic Sensor Memory Board    Normal	---F/---C 188F/ 87C
	       5  Basic Sensor Memory Board    Normal	 82F/ 28C 188F/ 87C
	       6  Basic Sensor Memory Board    Normal	---F/---C 188F/ 87C
	       7  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal	 89F/ 32C 192F/ 89C
	       8  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal	---F/---C 192F/ 89C
	       9  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal	 84F/ 29C 192F/ 89C
	      10  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal	118F/ 48C 230F/110C
	      11  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal	 96F/ 36C 192F/ 89C
	      12  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal	 84F/ 29C 154F/ 68C
	      13  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal	 87F/ 31C 154F/ 68C
	      14  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal	 89F/ 32C 156F/ 69C
	      15  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal	 93F/ 34C 161F/ 72C
	      16  Basic Sensor Ambient	       Normal	---F/---C 192F/ 89C
	      17  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal	---F/---C 192F/ 89C
	      18  Basic Sensor SCSI Backplane  Normal	 32F/  0C 140F/ 60C

		     our @HPTEMP_1 = (
			  "2",
			  "3",
		     );
		     our @HPTEMP_2 = (
			  "1",
			  "5",
			  "18",
		     );
		     our @HPTEMP_3 = (
			  "7",
			  "9",
			  "10",
			  "11",
			  "12",
			  "13",
		     );

   LM-Sensors and GPU temperatures (lmsens.rrd)
       SENSORS_LIST
	      You may specify in this associative array the sensors you want to monitor with  the
	      same names as they appear in your sensors command.

	      For example, imagine a sensors output like this:

	      # sensors
	      coretemp-isa-0000
	      Adapter: ISA adapter
	      Core 0:	    +51.0oC  (high = +78.0oC, crit = +100.0oC)

	      coretemp-isa-0001
	      Adapter: ISA adapter
	      Core 1:	    +49.0oC  (high = +78.0oC, crit = +100.0oC)

	      f71882fg-isa-0a00
	      Adapter: ISA adapter
	      3.3V:	   +3.30 V
	      Vcore:	   +1.21 V  (max =  +2.04 V)
	      Vdimm:	   +1.82 V
	      Vchip:	   +1.38 V
	      +5V:	   +5.00 V
	      12V:	  +14.37 V
	      5VSB:	   +4.33 V
	      3VSB:	   +3.30 V
	      Battery:	   +3.22 V
	      CPU:	  2035 RPM
	      System:	  1765 RPM  ALARM
	      Power:	  2110 RPM  ALARM
	      Aux:	  2080 RPM  ALARM
	      M/B Temp:   +36.00 C
	      CPU Temp:   +29.00 C

	      Then you may want to configure the SENSORS_LIST associative array as:

		     our %SENSORS_LIST = (
			  "CORE0" => "Core 0",
			  "CORE1" => "Core 1",
			  "MB0"   => "M/B Temp",
			  "CPU0"  => "CPU Temp",
			  "FAN0"  => "CPU",
			  "FAN1"  => "System",
			  "FAN2"  => "Power",
			  "FAN3"  => "Aux",
			  "VOLT0"  => "3.3V",
			  "VOLT1"  => "VCore",
			  "VOLT2"  => "Vdimm",
			  "VOLT3"  => "Vchip",
			  "VOLT4"  => "\\+5V",
			  "VOLT5"  => "12V",
			  "VOLT6"  => "5VSB",
			  "VOLT7"  => "3VSB",
			  "VOLT8"  => "Battery",
			  "GPU0"   => "nvidia",
		     );

	      Note  that  you need to precede the plus and minus signs in the voltage labels with
	      double forward slashes.

	      The last one, GPU0, is set here just in case you have an NVIDIA card  and  want  to
	      monitor  its  temperature.  Currently  only NVIDIA cards are supported so the value
	      nvidia is mandatory.

	      This array has the following maximums allowed:

		     Up to 16 CORE keys
		     Up to 2 MB keys
		     Up to 4 CPU keys
		     Up to 9 FAN keys
		     Up to 12 VOLT keys
		     Up to 9 GPU keys

   NVIDIA temperatures and usage (nvidia.rrd)
       NVIDIA_MAX
	      This is the number of NVIDIA cards currently plugged in your system.

	      The maximum allowed is 9.

	      Default value: 1

   Disk drive temperatures and health (disk.rrd)
       This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of disk drives.

       DISK_LIST
	      This is a two-dimensional array of groups of disk device names  that  you  want  to
	      monitor.	Each  group  will  become a graph and there may be an unlimited number of
	      groups.

	      WARNING: Every time the number of groups	in  this  list	changes,  Monitorix  will
	      resize the disk.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

	      To  collect  the	disk  drive temperatures and health the commands smartmontools or
	      hddtemp are required.

	      It is recommended that you first check if either smartctl or hddtemp  are  able  to
	      collect  data  from  the	disk drive(s) that you plan to monitor. You may test this
	      with the following command:

		     # hddtemp /dev/sda
		     /dev/sda: WDC WD1600AABS-00M1A0: 48oC

	      If you see good results as above, you can add it in the list like this:

		     our @DISK_LIST = (
			  [
			       "/dev/sda",
			       "/dev/sdb",
			  ],
		     );

	      The maximum number of disk device names allowed per group is 8.

   Filesystem usage and I/O activity (fs.rrd)
       This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of filesystems.

       FS_LIST
	      This is a two-dimensional array of groups of mounted filesystems that you  want  to
	      monitor.	Each  group  will  become a graph and there may be an unlimited number of
	      groups.

	      WARNING: Every time the number of groups	in  this  list	changes,  Monitorix  will
	      resize the fs.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

	      Take  special  care to use the same name as appears in the output of the df command
	      (the swap device is a special case). An example would be:

		     our @FS_LIST = (
			  [
			       "/",
			       "swap",
			       "/boot",
			       "/home",
			       "/mnt/backup",
			  ],
		     );

	      The maximum number of filesystems allowed per group is 8.

       FS_DESC
	      This associative array complements the FS_LIST array. It basically  allows  you  to
	      change  the  name  that will appear in the graph, hiding the real name of the mount
	      point. If no association is defined, then Monitorix will display the name specified
	      in the FS_LIST array.

		     our %FS_DESC = (
			  "/"		 => "Root FS",
			  "/home"	 => "My Home",
			  "/mnt/backup"  => "Backups",
		     );

	      You can define as much entries as you want.

       FS_DEV
	      This  associative  array	complements  the FS_LIST array. Monitorix tries itself to
	      detect automatically the device name associated to each filesystem defined  in  the
	      FS_LIST  array  to show its I/O activity. If you feel Monitorix failed to detect it
	      then you can help it using this associative array.

		     our %FS_DEV = (
			  "/"		 => "/dev/sda1",
			  "/home"	 => "/dev/mapper/dm-0",
			  "/mnt/backup"  => "/dev/mapper/dm-1",
		     );

	      You can define as much entries as you want.

   Network traffic and usage (net.rrd)
       NET_LIST
	      This is the list of network interfaces that you may want	to  monitor.  An  example
	      would be:

		     our @NET_LIST = (
			  "eth0",
			  "eth1",
		     );

	      The maximum number of entries allowed is 10.

       NET_DESC
	      This is the array where each network interface listed in NET_LIST is described. Put
	      one description for each interface listed. An example would be:

		     our @NET_DESC = (
			  "FastEthernet LAN",
			  "ADSL 10Mbs Internet",
		     );

	      The maximum number of entries allowed is 10.

       NET_RIGID
	      This is the location where the scaling of the network graph can be specified.

	      The possible values are:

	      0   No rigid actually, no lower-limit and no upper-limit.
	      1   No rigid actually, but with lower-limit and upper-limit.
	      2   Rigid with lower-limit and upper-limit.

	      There must be an entry here for each network interface listed in NET_LIST. An exam-
	      ple would be:

		     our @NET_RIGID = (
			  "0",
			  "2",
		     );

	      The maximum number of entries allowed is 10.

       NET_LIMIT
	      This  is	where  you can enter the upper value limit for the graph. Since Monitorix
	      uses bytes/s instead of bits/s, the value entered here must be in bytes.

	      Remember to put an entry here for each network interface listed in  NET_LIST.  Fol-
	      lowing the description of the above example, it would be:

		     our @NET_LIMIT = (
			  "10000000",
			  "1000000",
		     );

	      That is:

	      "Fast Ethernet LAN" means 100Mb/s, which means ~10MB/s which means 10000000 bytes.

	      and

	      "ADSL 10Mb Internet" means 10Mb/s, which means ~1MB/s which means 1000000 bytes.

	      The maximum number of entries allowed is 10.

       NET_GATEWAY
	      This  is	where  the  network interface that acts as the gateway for this server is
	      defined. This is mainly used if you plan to monitor the network  traffic	usage  of
	      the PCs on your LAN using the PC_LIST option below.

   System services demand (serv.rrd)
       SERV_MODE
	      This  option  toggles the way the System Services Demand data is represented in the
	      graph. There are two possible values:

		     I	for incremental style
		     L	for load (spikes) style

	      Default value: I

   Mail statistics (mail.rrd)
       MAIL_MTA
	      This option specifies the MTA that Monitorix will use to collect	mail  statistics.
	      The currently supported MTAs are:
		     Sendmail
		     Postfix

	      NOTE: the pflogsumm utility is required when using Postfix MTA.

	      Default value: sendmail

       MAIL_GREYLIST
	      This  option  specifies  the  Greylisting implementation that Monitorix will use to
	      collect statistical information. In the future more Greylisting  software  will  be
	      supported.

	      The currently supported Greylist software is:
		     milter-greylist

	      Default value: milter-greylist

   Network port traffic (port.rrd)
       This graph requires the iptables command on Linux systems, and the ipfw command on FreeBSD
       and OpenBSD systems.

       PORT_MAX
	      This is the number of network ports that you want to monitor. There is no limit  to
	      the  number  of  ports  monitored,  but  keep  in  mind that every time this number
	      changes, Monitorix will resize the port.rrd file accordingly, removing all histori-
	      cal data.

	      Default value: 9

       PORT_RULE
	      This is the rule number that Monitorix will use when using the ipfw command to man-
	      age network port activity on FreeBSD and OpenBSD systems. Change it if you think it
	      might conflict with any other rule number.

	      Default value: 24000

       PORT_LIST
	      You  may define here up to PORT_MAX network port numbers. If you see a red color in
	      the background of a network port graph, it means that there is not a daemon listen-
	      ing  on  that  port. This can be useful to know if some service gone down unexpect-
	      edly.

       PORT_NAME
	      This array complements the PORT_LIST array. Each option pairs with the one  in  the
	      same position of the array. It basically permits naming network ports.

       PORT_PROT
	      This  array  complements the PORT_LIST array. Each option pairs with the one in the
	      same position of the array. It permits defining the protocol type to be used in the
	      traffic reporting. The protocol type must be valid and supported by your system.

   Users using the system (user.rrd)
       Only the limit and rigid values may be set here.

   Apache statistics (apache.rrd)
       This graph requires that mod_status be loaded and ExtendedStatus option set to On in order
       to collect full status information of the Apache web server.

       This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of local and remote Apache web servers.

       APACHE_LIST
	      This is a list of URLs of the monitored Apache web servers.

	      WARNING: Every time the number of entries in  this  list	changes,  Monitorix  will
	      resize the apache.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

	      Default value: http://localhost:80/

   Nginx statistics (nginx.rrd)
       This  graph may require adding some lines in the configuration file nginx.conf. Please see
       the README.nginx file to determine the exact steps needed to configure Nginx to get status
       information.

       This graph requires the iptables command on Linux systems, and the ipfw command on FreeBSD
       and OpenBSD systems.

       NGINX_PORT
	      This is the network port the Nginx web server is listening on.

	      Default value: 80

       NGINX_RULE
	      This is the rule number that Monitorix will use when using the ipfw command to man-
	      age  Nginx  network activity on FreeBSD and OpenBSD systems. Change it if you think
	      it might conflict with any other rule number.

	      Default value: 24100

   Lighttpd statistics (lighttpd.rrd)
       This graph requires that mod_status is loaded in order to collect status information  from
       the Lighttpd web server.

       This  graph  is	able  to  monitor  an  unlimited  number of local and remote Lighttpd web
       servers.

       LIGHTTPD_LIST
	      This is a list of URLs of the monitored Lighttpd web servers.

	      WARNING: Every time the number of entries of  this  list	changes,  Monitorix  will
	      resize the lighttpd.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

	      Default value: http://localhost:80/

   MySQL statistics (mysql.rrd)
       This  graph  requires  that you create a password protected MySQL user that is NOT granted
       privileges on any DB.

       Example:

       mysql> CREATE USER 'user'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';
       mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

       where user is the new user name and password is the password that will be  used	for  that
       user.

       This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of local and remote MySQL web servers.

       NOTE: It is strongly recommended that you restart the MySQL service in order to avoid high
       spikes that could prevent correct display of the first plotted data.

       MYSQL_CONN_TYPE
	      This option toggles the way how Monitorix establishes the connection with the MySQL
	      server. There are two possible values:

		     Host    using the network (hostname and IP address)
		     Socket  using a socket file

	      Default value: Host

       MYSQL_HOST_LIST
	      This is the list of hostnames of MySQL servers.

	      WARNING: Every time the number of entries of this list change Monitorix will resize
	      the mysql.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

	      Default value: localhost

       MYSQL_PORT_LIST
	      This is the TCP port number to use for the connection of each  hostname  listed  in
	      the MYSQL_HOST_LIST.

	      Default value: 3306

       MYSQL_USER_LIST
	      This   is   the  user  name  used  to  connect  to  each	hostname  listed  in  the
	      MYSQL_HOST_LIST. See the example above.

	      Default value: none

       MYSQL_PASS_LIST
	      This  is	the  password  used  to  connect  to  each   hostname	listed	 in   the
	      MYSQL_HOST_LIST. See the example above.

	      Default value: none

       MYSQL_SOCK_LIST
	      This is the list of socket files of MySQL servers.

	      WARNING: Every time the number of entries of this list change Monitorix will resize
	      the mysql.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

	      Default value: /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock

       Some of the values shown in the graphs are the result of a calculation of two values  from
       either SHOW [GLOBAL] STATUS or SHOW VARIABLES. The following is an explanation of them:

       Thread Cache Hit Rate
       (1 - (Threads_created / Connections)) * 100
       When  an  application connects to a MySQL database, the database has to create a thread to
       manage the connection and the queries that will be sent in that connection.  The  database
       instructs  the  kernel to create a new thread, and the kernel allocates resources and cre-
       ates the thread, then returns it to the MySQL service. When the connection  is  terminated
       by  the	application, MySQL tells the kernel to destroy the thread and free the resources.
       This create/destroy mechanism causes considerable overhead if the MySQL	server	has  many
       new connections per second.
       If  MySQL  doesn't destroy the thread when the connection is terminated, but reuses it and
       assigns it to the next connection then this will decrease the kernel overhead. This is why
       a  high	Thread	Cache  Hit Rate improves MySQL performance and decreases the system's CPU
       usage.
       Setting the parameter thread_cache_size in the my.cnf file accordingly will help  to  cor-
       rectly  balance	between  having a great thread cache and keeping MySQL memory consumption
       reasonable.
       Higher is better.

       Query Cache Hit Rate
       Qcache_hits / Qcache_inserts
       Higher should be considered better. This value should grow proportionally with the  number
       of executed queries, if the query cache is performing well. Please also have a look at the
       Query cache usage percentage to know if your query_cache configuration is appropriate.

       Query Cache Usage
       (1 - (Qcache_free_memory / query_cache_size)) * 100
       This value should be  reasonably  far  from  100%,  otherwise  consider	incrementing  the
       query_cache_size parameter in my.cnf.

       Connections Usage
       (Max_used_connections / max_connections) * 100
       This  value  should  be	reasonably  far  from  100%,  otherwise consider incrementing the
       max_connections parameter in my.cnf.

       Key Buffer Usage
       (Key_blocks_used / (Key_blocks_used + Key_blocks_unused)) * 100
       This value should be  reasonably  far  from  100%,  otherwise  consider	incrementing  the
       key_buffer_size parameter in my.cnf.

       InnoDB Buffer Pool Usage
       (1 - (Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_free / Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_total)) * 100
       This  value  should  be reasonably far from 100%, otherwise consider incrementing the inn-
       odb_buffer_pool_size parameter in my.cnf.

   Squid Proxy Web Cache (squid.rrd)
       SQUID_CMD
	      This command displays statistics about the Squid HTTP proxy process and is the main
	      command used to collect all data.

	      Default value: squidclient -h 127.0.0.1

       SQUID_GRAPH_1
       SQUID_GRAPH_2
	      These  arrays  hold  the	selected Squid result or status codes to be shown in each
	      graph. Feel free to mix result status and code status in any of the two arrays.

	      For more information about the list of all the  result  and  status  codes,  please
	      refer to http://wiki.squid-cache.org/SquidFaq/SquidLogs.

	      Each graph has a limit number of 9 entries.

   NFS server statistics (nfss.rrd)
       NFSS_VERSION
	      This option specifies which NFS server version is running in the system in order to
	      correctly gather the correct values.

	      The possible values are:
		     2	for NFS version 2
		     3	for NFS version 3
		     4	for NFS version 4

	      Default value: 3

       NFSS_GRAPH_1
       NFSS_GRAPH_2
       NFSS_GRAPH_3
	      These arrays hold the defined NFS server activity statistics to be  shown  in  each
	      graph. Put every statistic name exactly as they appear in the output of the nfsstat
	      command.

	      Each graph has a limit number of 10 entries.

   NFS client statistics (nfsc.rrd)
       NFSC_VERSION
	      This option specifies which NFS server version is running in the system in order to
	      correctly gather the correct values.

	      The possible values are:
		     2	for NFS version 2
		     3	for NFS version 3
		     4	for NFS version 4

	      Default value: 3

       NFSC_GRAPH_1
       NFSC_GRAPH_2
       NFSC_GRAPH_3
       NFSC_GRAPH_4
       NFSC_GRAPH_5
	      These  arrays  hold  the defined NFS client activity statistics to be shown in each
	      graph. Put every statistic name exactly as they appear in the output of the nfsstat
	      command.

	      Each graph has the following limit number of entries:

	      NFSC_GRAPH_1 up to 10 entries
	      NFSC_GRAPH_2 up to 10 entries
	      NFSC_GRAPH_3 up to 4 entries
	      NFSC_GRAPH_4 up to 4 entries
	      NFSC_GRAPH_5 up to 4 entries

   BIND statistics (bind.rrd)
       This graph requires a BIND server with version 9.5 or higher, and in order to see all sta-
       tistics provided by BIND you must configure the statistics-channels like this:

       statistics-channels {
	       inet 127.0.0.1 port 8053;
       };

       This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of BIND servers.

       BIND_URL_LIST
	      This is a list of URLs of BIND servers status pages.

	      WARNING: Every time the number of entries in  this  list	changes,  Monitorix  will
	      resize the bind.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

	      Default value: http://localhost:8053/

       BIND_IN_QUERIES_LIST
	      This  is	a  two-dimensional  array  of  RR  (Resource Records) types for each BIND
	      server. The RR types defined here will appear in the Incoming Queries  graph  which
	      shows the number of incoming queries for each RR type.

	      For  a complete list of RR types check the BIND 9 Administrator Reference Manual at
	      <http://ftp.isc.org/www/bind/arm95/Bv9ARM.html>.

	      our @BIND_IN_QUERIES_LIST = (
		   [
			"A",
			"AAAA",
			"ANY",
			"DS",
			"MX",
			"NS",
			"PTR",
			"SOA",
			"SRV",
			"TXT",
			"NAPTR",
			"A6",
			"CNAME",
			"SPF",
			"KEY",
			"DNSKEY",
			"HINFO",
			"WKS",
			"PX",
			"NSAP",
		   ],
	      );

	      The maximum number of RR types allowed for this graph is 20.

       BIND_OUT_QUERIES_LIST
	      This is a two-dimensional array of  RR  (Resource  Records)  types  for  each  BIND
	      server.  The  RR	types  defined	here  will  appear  in the Outgoing Queries graph
	      (_default view) which shows the number of outgoing queries sent by the  DNS  server
	      resolver for each RR type.

	      our @BIND_OUT_QUERIES_LIST = (
		   [
			"A",
			"AAAA",
			"ANY",
			"DS",
			"MX",
			"NS",
			"PTR",
			"SOA",
			"SRV",
			"TXT",
			"NAPTR",
			"A6",
			"CNAME",
			"SPF",
			"KEY",
			"DNSKEY",
			"HINFO",
			"WKS",
			"PX",
			"NSAP",
		   ],
	      );

	      The maximum number of RR types allowed for this graph is 20.

       BIND_SERVER_STATS_LIST
	      This  is a two-dimensional array of counters about incoming request processing. The
	      counters defined here will appear in the Server Statistics graph.

	      our @BIND_SERVER_STATS_LIST = (
		   [
			"Requestv4",
			"Requestv6",
			"ReqEdns0",
			"ReqBadEDNSVer",
			"ReqTSIG",
			"ReqSIG0",
			"ReqBadSIG",
			"ReqTCP",
			"Response",
			"QrySuccess",
			"QryAuthAns",
			"QryNoauthAns",
			"QryReferral",
			"QryNxrrset",
			"QrySERVFAIL",
			"QryNXDOMAIN",
			"QryRecursion",
			"QryDuplicate",
			"QryDropped",
			"QryFailure",
		   ],
	      );

	      The maximum number of counters allowed for this graph is 20.

       BIND_RESOLVER_STATS_LIST
	      This is a two-dimensional array of counters about name resolution performed in  the
	      internal resolver. The counters defined here will appear in the Resolver Statistics
	      graph (_default view).

	      our @BIND_RESOLVER_STATS_LIST = (
		   [
			"Queryv4",
			"Queryv6",
			"Responsev4",
			"Responsev6",
			"NXDOMAIN",
			"SERVFAIL",
			"FORMERR",
			"OtherError",
			"EDNS0Fail",
			"Truncated",
			"Lame",
			"Retry",
			"QueryTimeout",
			"GlueFetchv4",
			"GlueFetchv6",
			"GlueFetchv4Fail",
			"GlueFetchv6Fail",
			"ValAttempt",
			"ValOk",
			"ValNegOk",
		   ],
	      );

	      The maximum number of counters allowed for this graph is 20.

       BIND_CACHE_RRSETS_LIST
	      This is a two-dimensional array of  RR  (Resource  Records)  types  for  each  BIND
	      server.  The  RR	types  defined	here  will  appear  in	the Cache DB RRsets graph
	      (_default view) which shows the number of RRsets per RR type (positive or negative)
	      and nonexistent names stored in the cache database.

	      our @BIND_CACHE_RRSETS_LIST = (
		   [
			"A",
			"!A",
			"AAAA",
			"!AAAA",
			"DLV",
			"!DLV",
			"DS",
			"!DS",
			"MX",
			"NS",
			"CNAME",
			"!CNAME",
			"SOA",
			"!SOA",
			"!ANY",
			"PTR",
			"RRSIG",
			"NSEC",
			"DNSKEY",
			"NXDOMAIN",
		   ],
	      );

	      The maximum number of RR types allowed for this graph is 20.

   NTP statistics (ntp.rrd)
       This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of NTP servers.

       NTP_HOST_LIST
	      This is a list of NTP servers.

	      WARNING:	Every  time  the  number  of entries in this list changes, Monitorix will
	      resize the ntp.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

	      Default value: localhost

       NTP_CODE_LIST
	      This is a two-dimensional array of group of Reference Identifier and  Kiss-o'-Death
	      Codes for every hostname specified in the NTP_HOST_LIST option.

	      For more information on these NTP codes:
	      <http://www.iana.org/assignments/ntp-parameters/ntp-parameters.xml>
	      <http://www.iana.org/go/rfc5905>

	      our @NTP_CODE_LIST = (
		   [
			"AUTH",
			"AUTO",
			"CRYP",
			"DENY",
			"GPS",
			"INIT",
			"NKEY",
			"RATE",
			"RMOT",
			"RSTR",
		   ],
		   [
			"DENY",
			"RMOT",
			"RSTR",
		   ],
	      );

	      The maximum number of codes allowed for each hostname is 10.

   Fail2ban statistics (fail2ban.rrd)
       This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of Fail2ban jails.

       FAIL2BAN_PER_ROW
	      This is the number of fail2ban graphs that will be put in a row.

	      Default value: 2

       FAIL2BAN_LIST
	      This  is	a  two-dimensional  array  of  unlimited  group  of jails defined in your
	      Fail2ban configuration. For every group specified there is the ability to specify a
	      description in the FAIL2BAN_DESC array.

	      WARNING:	Every  time  the  number  of entries in this list changes, Monitorix will
	      resize the fail2ban.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

	      our @FAIL2BAN_LIST = (
		   [
			"[apache]",
			"[apache-mod-security]",
			"[courierauth]",
			"[sshd]",
			"[pam-generic]",
			"[php-url-fopen]",
			"[vsftpd]",
		   ],
		   [
			"[apache-imdbphp]",
			"[apache-evasive]",
		   ],
	      );

	      The maximum number of jails allowed for each group is 9.

       FAIL2BAN_DESC
	      This is the description of each group of jails in FAIL2BAN_LIST. Put  one  descrip-
	      tion for each group. An example would be:

	      our @FAIL2BAN_DESC = (
		   "Security",
		   "Overload / Abuse",
	      );

   Icecast Streaming Media Server (icecast.rrd)
       This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of Icecast servers.

       ICECAST_URL_LIST
	      This is a list of URLs of Icecast server status pages.

	      WARNING:	Every  time  the  number  of entries in this list changes, Monitorix will
	      resize the icecast.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

	      Default value: http://localhost:8000/status.xsl

       ICECAST_MP_LIST
	      This is a two-dimensional array of mountpoints configured for every  URL	specified
	      in the ICECAST_URL_LIST option.

	      our @ICECAST_MP_LIST = (
		   [
			"/stream1",
			"/stream2",
			"/stream3",
		   ],
		   [
			"/stream1",
			"/stream2",
		   ],
	      );

	      The maximum number of mountpoints allowed for each URL is 9.

       ICECAST_GRAPH_MODE
	      This  changes  the  layout  of the listeners graph, the possible values are R for a
	      real graph, or S for a stacked graph (every line or area is stacked on top  of  the
	      previous element).

	      Default value: R

   Devices interrupt activity (int.rrd)
       Only the limit and rigid values may be set here.

   Monitoring remote servers (Multihost)
       The  Multihost  feature	allows you to monitor an unlimitted number of remote servers that
       already have Monitorix installed.

       Monitorix assumes that every remote server has been configured with the same  settings  in
       the  BASE_URL and BASE_CGI options. Future versions may introduce the ability to have dif-
       ferent configurations between local and remote servers.

       MULTIHOST
	      This option enables the Multihost feature.

	      Default value: N

       MULTIHOST_FOOTER
	      If set to Y Monitorix will show the original URL of each server at  the  bottom  of
	      the graph. Where security is important you may want to hide this information.

	      Default value: Y

       MULTIHOST_IMGS_PER_ROW
	      If  your	horizontal screen resolution is pretty wide, you may want to increase the
	      number of graphs that appear on each row.

	      Default value: 2

       REMOTEHOST_LIST
	      This is a list of remote servers, with Monitorix	already  installed  and  working,
	      that  you  plan  to  monitor from here. It consists of a series of name/value pairs
	      with the right side being the URL or IP address and the left  the  server  descrip-
	      tion.

	      An example of this list would be:

		     our @REMOTEHOST_LIST = (
			  "WWW Linux",	  "http://www.example.com",
			  "Backup Linux", "http://192.168.1.4",
			  "SMTP Linux",   "http://71.16.11.2:8080",
		     );

	      As  you can see all three entries use URLs to designate the location of each remote
	      server. This means that each server most also have been installed on a CGI  capable
	      web server like Apache.

       GROUPS
	      This  enables  the  server grouping for those environments where there are too much
	      servers to display at the same time. Hence, you can group them  in  order  to  show
	      them separatedly.

	      Default value: N

       REMOTEGROUP_LIST
	      This  is	a  list of groups of remote servers, with Monitorix already installed and
	      working, that you plan to monitor from here. It consists of a series of  name/value
	      pairs  with  the	right side being the names of the remote servers given in REMOTE-
	      HOST_LIST (separated by a colon) and in the left the group name.

	      An example of this list would be:

		     our @REMOTEGROUP_LIST = (
			  "My Group",	 "Backup Linux:SMTP Linux",
		     );

   Monitoring the Internet traffic of LAN PCs, devices or whole networks
       If your server acts as the gateway for a group of PCs, devices or even whole  networks  in
       your local LAN, you may want to know much Internet traffic each one is generating.

       This graph requires the iptables command on Linux systems, and the ipfw command on FreeBSD
       and OpenBSD systems.

       The following are the options you will need to configure to accomplish all of this.

       PC_LAN
	      This option enables this feature.

	      Default value: N

       PC_MAX
	      This is the number of LAN devices you want to monitor. There is no limit, but  keep
	      in  mind	that  every  time  this number changes, Monitorix will resize its current
	      pc.rrd file, removing all historical data.

	      Default value: 10

       PC_IMGS_PER_ROW
	      If your horizontal screen resolution is pretty wide, you may want to  increase  the
	      number of graphs that appear on each row.

	      Default value: 2

       PC_LIST
	      This  is	the  list of names of PCs, LAN devices or whole networks that you want to
	      monitor. The only requirement is that all they must utilize this	server	as  their
	      gateway.

	      If  the  names  in  this list are able to be resolved by a DNS query then you don't
	      need to define the PC_IP list (below) with corresponding IP addresses.

	      An example would be:

		     our @PC_LIST = (
			  "pc8",
			  "printer",
			  "scanner",
			  "lan3",
		     );

       PC_IP
	      This is the list of IP addresses and network masks  corresponding  to  the  entries
	      defined  in  the	PC_LIST.  This	list  is only used when the those entries are not
	      resolvable through a DNS query.

	      An example would be:

		     our @PC_IP = (
			  "192.168.1.108/32",
			  "192.168.1.122/32",
			  "192.168.1.203/32",
			  "192.168.2.0/24",
		     );

       PC_ENABLE_MONTHLY_REPORTS
	      If this option is set to Y, Monitorix will send a report of all the monthly  Inter-
	      net  activity  of  the defined devices in PC_LIST to the specified email address on
	      the first day of each month.

	      Default value: N

       PC_REPORT_LANG
	      Define here the language used in the monthly report.

	      The possible values are: ca, de, en, it and pl.

	      Default value: en

       PC_DEFAULT_MAIL
	      This is the default email address used to send the monthly reports. This option  is
	      only used if the PC_REPORT_MAIL array is empty.

	      Default value: root@localhost

       PC_REPORT_MAIL
	      This  is	the list of email addresses (one per entry) that corresponds to each name
	      listed in the PC_LIST array. If this list is empty then the PC_DEFAULT_MAIL  option
	      will be used as the default email address for all the PCs.

	      An example would be:

		     our @PC_MAIL = (
			  "user1@example.com",
			  "user2@example.com",
			  "user3@example.com",
			  "admin@example.com",
		     );

AUTHOR
       Monitorix is written by Jordi Sanfeliu <jordi@fibranet.cat>

COPYRIGHT
       Copyright (C) 2005-2012 Jordi Sanfeliu
       Licensed under the GNU General Public License v2 (GPL).

SEE ALSO
       monitorix(8), rrdtool(1)

2.6.0					     Sep 2012				monitorix.conf(5)
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