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tempfile(1) [linux man page]

TEMPFILE(1)						      General Commands Manual						       TEMPFILE(1)

NAME
tempfile - create a temporary file in a safe manner SYNOPSIS
tempfile [-d DIR] [-p STRING] [-s STRING] [-m MODE] [-n FILE] [--directory=DIR] [--prefix=STRING] [--suffix=STRING] [--mode=MODE] [--name=FILE] [--help] [--version] DESCRIPTION
tempfile creates a temporary file in a safe manner. It uses tempnam(3) to choose the name and opens it with O_RDWR | O_CREAT | O_EXCL. The filename is printed on standard output. See tempnam(3) for the actual steps involved in directory selection. The directory in which to create the file might be searched for in this order (but refer to tempnam(3) for authoritative answers): a) In case the environment variable TMPDIR exists and contains the name of an appropriate directory, that is used. b) Otherwise, if the --directory argument is specified and appropriate, it is used. c) Otherwise, P_tmpdir (as defined in <stdio.h>) is used when appropriate. d) Finally an implementation-defined directory (/tmp) may be used. OPTIONS
-d, --directory DIR Place the file in DIR. -m, --mode MODE Open the file with MODE instead of 0600. -n, --name FILE Use FILE for the name instead of tempnam(3). The options -d, -p, and -s are ignored if this option is given. -p, --prefix STRING Use up to five letters of STRING to generate the name. -s, --suffix STRING Generate the file with STRING as the suffix. --help Print a usage message on standard output and exit successfully. --version Print version information on standard output and exit successfully. RETURN VALUES
An exit status of 0 means the temporary file was created successfully. Any other exit status indicates an error. BUGS
Exclusive creation is not guaranteed when creating files on NFS partitions. tempfile is deprecated; you should use mktemp(1) instead. EXAMPLE
#!/bin/sh #[...] t=$(tempfile) || exit trap "rm -f -- '$t'" EXIT #[...] rm -f -- "$t" trap - EXIT exit SEE ALSO
tempnam(3), mktemp(1) Debian 30 May 2011 TEMPFILE(1)

Check Out this Related Man Page

TEMPNAM(3)						     Linux Programmer's Manual							TEMPNAM(3)

NAME
tempnam - create a name for a temporary file SYNOPSIS
#include <stdio.h> char *tempnam(const char *dir, const char *pfx); DESCRIPTION
The tempnam() function returns a pointer to a string that is a valid filename, and such that a file with this name did not exist when temp- nam() checked. The filename suffix of the pathname generated will start with pfx in case pfx is a non-NULL string of at most five bytes. The directory prefix part of the pathname generated is required to be `appropriate' (often that at least implies writable). Attempts to find an appropriate directory go through the following steps: (i) In case the environment variable TMPDIR exists and contains the name of an appropriate directory, that is used. (ii) Otherwise, if the dir argument is non-NULL and appropriate, it is used. (iii) Otherwise, P_tmpdir (as defined in <stdio.h>) is used when appropriate. (iv) Finally an implementation-defined directory may be used. RETURN VALUE
The tempnam() function returns a pointer to a unique temporary filename, or NULL if a unique name cannot be generated. ERRORS
ENOMEM Allocation of storage failed. NOTES
SUSv2 does not mention the use of TMPDIR; glibc will use it only when the program is not suid. SVID2 specifies that the directory used under (iv) is /tmp. SVID2 specifies that the string returned by tempnam() was allocated using malloc(3) and hence can be freed by free(3). The tempnam() function generates a different string each time it is called, up to TMP_MAX (defined in <stdio.h>) times. If it is called more than TMP_MAX times, the behaviour is implementation defined. In case the pfx argument has length larger than five, glibc will use the first five bytes. Upon failure to find a unique name, glibc will return EEXIST. BUGS
The precise meaning of `appropriate' is undefined; it is unspecified how accessibility of a directory is determined. Never use this func- tion. Use mkstemp(3) instead. CONFORMING TO
SVID 2, BSD 4.3 SEE ALSO
mktemp(3), mkstemp(3), tmpfile(3), tmpnam(3) 1999-06-14 TEMPNAM(3)

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