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chown(8) [freebsd man page]

CHOWN(8)						    BSD System Manager's Manual 						  CHOWN(8)

NAME
chown -- change file owner and group SYNOPSIS
chown [-fhvx] [-R [-H | -L | -P]] owner[:group] file ... chown [-fhvx] [-R [-H | -L | -P]] :group file ... DESCRIPTION
The chown utility changes the user ID and/or the group ID of the specified files. Symbolic links named by arguments are silently left unchanged unless -h is used. The options are as follows: -H If the -R option is specified, symbolic links on the command line are followed. (Symbolic links encountered in the tree traversal are not followed.) -L If the -R option is specified, all symbolic links are followed. -P If the -R option is specified, no symbolic links are followed. This is the default. -R Change the user ID and/or the group ID of the specified directory trees (recursively, including their contents) and files. Beware of unintentionally matching the ``..'' hard link to the parent directory when using wildcards like ``.*''. -f Do not report any failure to change file owner or group, nor modify the exit status to reflect such failures. -h If the file is a symbolic link, change the user ID and/or the group ID of the link itself. -v Cause chown to be verbose, showing files as the owner is modified. If the -v flag is specified more than once, chown will print the filename, followed by the old and new numeric user/group ID. -x File system mount points are not traversed. The -H, -L and -P options are ignored unless the -R option is specified. In addition, these options override each other and the command's actions are determined by the last one specified. The owner and group operands are both optional, however, one must be specified. If the group operand is specified, it must be preceded by a colon (``:'') character. The owner may be either a numeric user ID or a user name. If a user name is also a numeric user ID, the operand is used as a user name. The group may be either a numeric group ID or a group name. If a group name is also a numeric group ID, the operand is used as a group name. The ownership of a file may only be altered by a super-user for obvious security reasons. EXIT STATUS
The chown utility exits 0 on success, and >0 if an error occurs. COMPATIBILITY
Previous versions of the chown utility used the dot (``.'') character to distinguish the group name. This has been changed to be a colon (``:'') character so that user and group names may contain the dot character. On previous versions of this system, symbolic links did not have owners. The -v and -x options are non-standard and their use in scripts is not recommended. SEE ALSO
chgrp(1), find(1), chown(2), fts(3), symlink(7) STANDARDS
The chown utility is expected to be IEEE Std 1003.2 (``POSIX.2'') compliant. HISTORY
A chown utility appeared in Version 1 AT&T UNIX. BSD
February 21, 2010 BSD

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CHOWN(8)						    BSD System Manager's Manual 						  CHOWN(8)

NAME
chown -- change file owner and group SYNOPSIS
chown [-R [-H | -L | -P]] [-fhv] owner[:group] file ... chown [-R [-H | -L | -P]] [-fhv] :group file ... DESCRIPTION
chown sets the user ID and/or the group ID of the specified files. The options are as follows: -H If the -R option is specified, symbolic links on the command line are followed. (Symbolic links encountered in the tree traversal are not followed.) -L If the -R option is specified, all symbolic links are followed. -P If the -R option is specified, no symbolic links are followed. -R Change the user ID and/or the group ID for the file hierarchies rooted in the files instead of just the files themselves. -f Don't report any failure to change file owner or group, nor modify the exit status to reflect such failures. -h If file is a symbolic link, the owner and/or group of the link is changed. -v Cause chown to be verbose, showing files as they are processed. The -H, -L and -P options are ignored unless the -R option is specified. In addition, these options override each other and the command's actions are determined by the last one specified. The -L option cannot be used together with the -h option. The owner and group operands are both optional, however, one must be specified. If the group operand is specified, it must be preceded by a colon (``:'') character. The owner may be either a user name or a numeric user ID. The group may be either a group name or a numeric group ID. Since it is valid to have a user or group name that is numeric (and doesn't have the numeric ID that matches its name) the name lookup is always done first. Pre- ceding an ID with a ``#'' character will force it to be taken as a number. The ownership of a file may only be altered by a super-user for obvious security reasons. Unless invoked by the super-user, chown clears the set-user-id and set-group-id bits on a file to prevent accidental or mischievous creation of set-user-id and set-group-id programs. The chown utility exits 0 on success, and >0 if an error occurs. COMPATIBILITY
Previous versions of the chown utility used the dot (``.'') character to distinguish the group name. This has been changed to be a colon (``:'') character so that user and group names may contain the dot character. SEE ALSO
chflags(1), chgrp(1), find(1), chown(2), lchown(2), fts(3), symlink(7) STANDARDS
The chown command is expected to be POSIX 1003.2 compliant. The -v option and the use of ``#'' to force a numeric lookup are extensions to IEEE Std 1003.2 (``POSIX.2''). BSD
December 9, 2005 BSD

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