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audit_user(5) [freebsd man page]

AUDIT_USER(5)						      BSD File Formats Manual						     AUDIT_USER(5)

NAME
audit_user -- events to be audited for given users DESCRIPTION
The audit_user file specifies which audit event classes are to be audited for the given users. If specified, these flags are combined with the system-wide audit flags in the audit_control(5) file to determine which classes of events to audit for that user. These settings take effect when the user logs in. Each line maps a user name to a list of classes that should be audited and a list of classes that should not be audited. Entries are of the form: username:alwaysaudit:neveraudit In the format above, alwaysaudit is a set of event classes that are always audited, and neveraudit is a set of event classes that should not be audited. These sets can indicate the inclusion or exclusion of multiple classes, and whether to audit successful or failed events. See audit_control(5) for more information about audit flags. Example entries in this file are: root:lo,ad:no jdoe:-fc,ad:+fw These settings would cause login/logout and administrative events that are performed on behalf of user ``root'' to be audited. No failure events are audited. For the user ``jdoe'', failed file creation events are audited, administrative events are audited, and successful file write events are never audited. IMPLEMENTATION NOTES
Per-user and global audit preselection configuration are evaluated at time of login, so users must log out and back in again for audit changes relating to preselection to take effect. Audit record preselection occurs with respect to the audit identifier associated with a process, rather than with respect to the UNIX user or group ID. The audit identifier is set as part of the user credential context as part of login, and typically does not change as a result of running setuid or setgid applications, such as su(1). This has the advantage that events that occur after running su(1) can be audited to the original authenticated user, as required by CAPP, but may be surprising if not expected. FILES
/etc/security/audit_user SEE ALSO
login(1), su(1), audit(4), audit_class(5), audit_control(5), audit_event(5) HISTORY
The OpenBSM implementation was created by McAfee Research, the security division of McAfee Inc., under contract to Apple Computer Inc. in 2004. It was subsequently adopted by the TrustedBSD Project as the foundation for the OpenBSM distribution. AUTHORS
This software was created by McAfee Research, the security research division of McAfee, Inc., under contract to Apple Computer Inc. Addi- tional authors include Wayne Salamon, Robert Watson, and SPARTA Inc. The Basic Security Module (BSM) interface to audit records and audit event stream format were defined by Sun Microsystems. BSD
January 4, 2008 BSD

Check Out this Related Man Page

AUDIT(4)						   BSD Kernel Interfaces Manual 						  AUDIT(4)

NAME
audit -- Security Event Audit SYNOPSIS
options AUDIT DESCRIPTION
Security Event Audit is a facility to provide fine-grained, configurable logging of security-relevant events, and is intended to meet the requirements of the Common Criteria (CC) Common Access Protection Profile (CAPP) evaluation. The FreeBSD audit facility implements the de facto industry standard BSM API, file formats, and command line interface, first found in the Solaris operating system. Information on the user space implementation can be found in libbsm(3). Audit support is enabled at boot, if present in the kernel, using an rc.conf(5) flag. The audit daemon, auditd(8), is responsible for con- figuring the kernel to perform audit, pushing configuration data from the various audit configuration files into the kernel. Audit Special Device The kernel audit facility provides a special device, /dev/audit, which is used by auditd(8) to monitor for audit events, such as requests to cycle the log, low disk space conditions, and requests to terminate auditing. This device is not intended for use by applications. Audit Pipe Special Devices Audit pipe special devices, discussed in auditpipe(4), provide a configurable live tracking mechanism to allow applications to tee the audit trail, as well as to configure custom preselection parameters to track users and events in a fine-grained manner. SEE ALSO
auditreduce(1), praudit(1), audit(2), auditctl(2), auditon(2), getaudit(2), getauid(2), poll(2), select(2), setaudit(2), setauid(2), libbsm(3), auditpipe(4), audit.log(5), audit_class(5), audit_control(5), audit_event(5), audit_user(5), audit_warn(5), rc.conf(5), audit(8), auditd(8), auditdistd(8) HISTORY
The OpenBSM implementation was created by McAfee Research, the security division of McAfee Inc., under contract to Apple Computer Inc. in 2004. It was subsequently adopted by the TrustedBSD Project as the foundation for the OpenBSM distribution. Support for kernel audit first appeared in FreeBSD 6.2. AUTHORS
This software was created by McAfee Research, the security research division of McAfee, Inc., under contract to Apple Computer Inc. Addi- tional authors include Wayne Salamon, Robert Watson, and SPARTA Inc. The Basic Security Module (BSM) interface to audit records and audit event stream format were defined by Sun Microsystems. This manual page was written by Robert Watson <rwatson@FreeBSD.org>. BUGS
The FreeBSD kernel does not fully validate that audit records submitted by user applications are syntactically valid BSM; as submission of records is limited to privileged processes, this is not a critical bug. Instrumentation of auditable events in the kernel is not complete, as some system calls do not generate audit records, or generate audit records with incomplete argument information. Mandatory Access Control (MAC) labels, as provided by the mac(4) facility, are not audited as part of records involving MAC decisions. BSD
May 31, 2009 BSD

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