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redhat-upgrade-tool(8) [centos man page]

REDHAT-UPGRADE-TOOL(8)					  redhat-upgrade-tool User Manual				    REDHAT-UPGRADE-TOOL(8)

NAME
redhat-upgrade-tool - Red Hat Upgrade tool SYNOPSIS
redhat-upgrade-tool [OPTIONS] SOURCE DESCRIPTION
redhat-upgrade-tool is the Red Hat Upgrade tool. The redhat-upgrade-tool client runs on the system to be upgraded. It determines what packages are needed for upgrade and gathers them from the source(s) given. It also fetches and sets up the boot images needed to run the upgrade and sets up the system to perform the upgrade at next boot. The actual upgrade takes place when the system is rebooted, using the boot images set up by redhat-upgrade-tool. The upgrade initrd starts the existing system (mostly) as normal, lets it mount all the local filesystems, then starts the upgrade. When the upgrade finishes, it reboots the system into the newly-upgraded OS. OPTIONS
Optional arguments -h, --help Show a help message and exit. -v, --verbose Print more info. -d, --debug Print lots of debugging info. --debuglog DEBUGLOG Write debugging output to the given file. Defaults to /var/log/redhat-upgrade-tool.log. --reboot Automatically reboot to start the upgrade when ready. SOURCE These options tell redhat-upgrade-tool where to look for the packages and boot images needed to run the upgrade. At least one of these options is required. --device [DEV] Device or mountpoint of mounted install media. If DEV is omitted, redhat-upgrade-tool will scan all currently-mounted removable devices (USB disks, optical media, etc.) --iso ISO Installation image file. --network VERSION Online repos matching VERSION (a number or "rawhide") Multiple sources may be used, if desired. Additional options for --network --enablerepo REPOID Enable one or more repos (wildcards allowed). --disablerepo REPOID Disable one or more repos (wildcards allowed). --addrepo REPOID=[@]URL Add the repo at URL. Prefix URL with @ to indicate that the URL is a mirrorlist. --instrepo REPOID Get upgrader boot images from the repo named REPOID. The repo must contain a valid .treeinfo file which points to the location of usable kernel and upgrade images. Cleanup commands --resetbootloader Remove any modifications made to bootloader configuration. --clean Clean up everything written by redhat-upgrade-tool. EXAMPLES
redhat-upgrade-tool --network 7.0 --instrepo <repo URL> Upgrade to RHEL 7.0 by downloading all needed packages and data from the specified repository. redhat-upgrade-tool --device --network 7.0 Upgrade to RHEL 7.0 using install media mounted somewhere on the system, fetching updates from the network if needed. EXIT STATUS
0 Success. 1 Cancelled by user, failure writing files to disk, or other unknown error 2 Failed to download/copy files from the given SOURCE 3 RPM upgrade transaction test failed BUGS
The --iso image must be on a filesystem listed in /etc/fstab. AUTHORS
Will Woods <wwoods@redhat.com> redhat-upgrade-tool 11/08/2013 REDHAT-UPGRADE-TOOL(8)

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pki-upgrade(8)							 PKI Upgrade Tool						    pki-upgrade(8)

NAME
pki-upgrade - Tool for upgrading system-wide configuration for Certificate System. SYNOPSIS
pki-upgrade [OPTIONS] DESCRIPTION
There are two parts to upgrading Certificate System: upgrading the system configuration files used by both the client and the server pro- cesses and upgrading the server configuration files. When upgrading Certificate System, the existing system configuration files (e.g. /etc/pki/pki.conf) may need to be upgraded because the content may have changed from one version to another. The configuration upgrade is executed automatically during RPM upgrade. However, in case there is a problem, the process can also be run manually using pki-upgrade. The system upgrade process is done incrementally using upgrade scriptlets. The upgrade process and scriptlet execution is monitored in upgrade trackers. A counter shows the latest index number for the most recently executed scriptlet; when all scriptlets have run, the com- ponent tracker shows the updated version number. The scriptlets are stored in the upgrade directory: /usr/share/pki/upgrade/<version>/<index>-<name> The version is the system version to be upgraded. The index is the script execution order. The name is the scriptlet name. During upgrade, the scriptlets will back up all changes to the filesystem into the following folder: /var/log/pki/upgrade/<version>/<index> The version and index values indicate the scriptlet being executed. A copy of the files and folders that are being modified or removed will be stored in oldfiles. The names of the newly-added files and folders will be stored in newfiles. The system upgrade process is tracked using this file: /etc/pki/pki.version The file stores the current configuration version and the last successful scriptlet index. OPTIONS
General options --silent Upgrade in silent mode. --status Show upgrade status only without performing the upgrade. --revert Revert the last version. -X Show advanced options. -v, --verbose Run in verbose mode. -h, --help Show this help message. Advanced options The advanced options circumvent the normal component tracking process by changing the scriptlet order or changing the tracker information. WARNING: These options may render the system unusable. --scriptlet-version <version> Run scriptlets for a specific version only. --scriptlet-index <index> Run a specific scriptlet only. --remove-tracker Remove the tracker. --reset-tracker Reset the tracker to match the package version. --set-tracker <version> Set the tracker to a specific version. OPERATIONS
Interactive mode By default, pki-upgrade will run interactively. It will ask for a confirmation before executing each scriptlet. % pki-upgrade If there is an error, it will stop and show the error. Silent mode The upgrade process can also be done silently without user interaction: % pki-upgrade --silent If there is an error, it will stop and show the error. Checking upgrade status It is possible to check the status of a running upgrade process. % pki-upgrade --status Troubleshooting If there is an error, rerun the upgrade in verbose mode: % pki-upgrade --verbose Check the scriptlet to see which operations are being executed. Once the error is identified and corrected, the upgrade can be resumed by re-running pki-upgrade. It is possible to rerun a failed script by itself, specifying the instance and subsystem, version, and scriptlet index: % pki-upgrade --scriptlet-version 10.0.1 --scriptlet-index 1 Reverting an upgrade If necessary, the upgrade can be reverted: % pki-upgrade --revert Files and folders that were created by the scriptlet will be removed. Files and folders that were modified or removed by the scriptlet will be restored. FILES
/usr/sbin/pki-upgrade AUTHORS
Ade Lee <alee@redhat.com>, Ella Deon Lackey <dlackey@redhat.com>, and Endi Dewata <edewata@redhat.com>. pki-upgrade was written by the Dogtag project. COPYRIGHT
Copyright (c) 2013 Red Hat, Inc. This is licensed under the GNU General Public License, version 2 (GPLv2). A copy of this license is avail- able at http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/gpl-2.0.txt. version 1.0 Jul 22, 2013 pki-upgrade(8)

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