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QCString(3qt)									    QCString(3qt)

NAME
       QCString - Abstraction of the classic C zero-terminated char array (char *)

SYNOPSIS
       All the functions in this class are reentrant when Qt is built with thread support.</p>

       #include <qcstring.h>

       Inherits QByteArray.

   Public Members
       QCString ()
       QCString ( int size )
       QCString ( const QCString & s )
       QCString ( const char * str )
       QCString ( const char * str, uint maxsize )
       QCString & operator= ( const QCString & s )
       QCString & operator= ( const char * str )
       bool isNull () const
       bool isEmpty () const
       uint length () const
       bool resize ( uint len )
       bool truncate ( uint pos )
       bool fill ( char c, int len = -1 )
       QCString copy () const
       QCString & sprintf ( const char * format, ... )
       int find ( char c, int index = 0, bool cs = TRUE ) const
       int find ( const char * str, int index = 0, bool cs = TRUE ) const
       int find ( const QRegExp & rx, int index = 0 ) const
       int findRev ( char c, int index = -1, bool cs = TRUE ) const
       int findRev ( const char * str, int index = -1, bool cs = TRUE ) const
       int findRev ( const QRegExp & rx, int index = -1 ) const
       int contains ( char c, bool cs = TRUE ) const
       int contains ( const char * str, bool cs = TRUE ) const
       int contains ( const QRegExp & rx ) const
       QCString left ( uint len ) const
       QCString right ( uint len ) const
       QCString mid ( uint index, uint len = 0xffffffff ) const
       QCString leftJustify ( uint width, char fill = ' ', bool truncate = FALSE ) const
       QCString rightJustify ( uint width, char fill = ' ', bool truncate = FALSE ) const
       QCString lower () const
       QCString upper () const
       QCString stripWhiteSpace () const
       QCString simplifyWhiteSpace () const
       QCString & insert ( uint index, const char * s )
       QCString & insert ( uint index, char c )
       QCString & append ( const char * str )
       QCString & prepend ( const char * s )
       QCString & remove ( uint index, uint len )
       QCString & replace ( uint index, uint len, const char * str )
       QCString & replace ( const QRegExp & rx, const char * str )
       QCString & replace ( char c, const char * after )
       QCString & replace ( const char * before, const char * after )
       QCString & replace ( char c1, char c2 )
       short toShort ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       ushort toUShort ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       int toInt ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       uint toUInt ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       long toLong ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       ulong toULong ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       float toFloat ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       double toDouble ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       QCString & setStr ( const char * str )
       QCString & setNum ( short n )
       QCString & setNum ( ushort n )
       QCString & setNum ( int n )
       QCString & setNum ( uint n )
       QCString & setNum ( long n )
       QCString & setNum ( ulong n )
       QCString & setNum ( float n, char f = 'g', int prec = 6 )
       QCString & setNum ( double n, char f = 'g', int prec = 6 )
       bool setExpand ( uint index, char c )
       operator const char * () const
       QCString & operator+= ( const char * str )
       QCString & operator+= ( char c )

RELATED FUNCTION DOCUMENTATION
       void * qmemmove ( void * dst, const void * src, uint len )
       char * qstrdup ( const char * src )
       char * qstrcpy ( char * dst, const char * src )
       char * qstrncpy ( char * dst, const char * src, uint len )
       uint qstrlen ( const char * str )
       int qstrcmp ( const char * str1, const char * str2 )
       int qstrncmp ( const char * str1, const char * str2, uint len )
       int qstricmp ( const char * str1, const char * str2 )
       int qstrnicmp ( const char * str1, const char * str2, uint len )
       QDataStream & operator<< ( QDataStream & s, const QCString & str )
       QDataStream & operator>> ( QDataStream & s, QCString & str )
       bool operator== ( const QCString & s1, const QCString & s2 )
       bool operator== ( const QCString & s1, const char * s2 )
       bool operator== ( const char * s1, const QCString & s2 )
       bool operator!= ( const QCString & s1, const QCString & s2 )
       bool operator!= ( const QCString & s1, const char * s2 )
       bool operator!= ( const char * s1, const QCString & s2 )
       bool operator< ( const QCString & s1, const char * s2 )
       bool operator< ( const char * s1, const QCString & s2 )
       bool operator<= ( const QCString & s1, const char * s2 )
       bool operator<= ( const char * s1, const QCString & s2 )
       bool operator> ( const QCString & s1, const char * s2 )
       bool operator> ( const char * s1, const QCString & s2 )
       bool operator>= ( const QCString & s1, const char * s2 )
       bool operator>= ( const char * s1, const QCString & s2 )
       const QCString operator+ ( const QCString & s1, const QCString & s2 )
       const QCString operator+ ( const QCString & s1, const char * s2 )
       const QCString operator+ ( const char * s1, const QCString & s2 )
       const QCString operator+ ( const QCString & s, char c )
       const QCString operator+ ( char c, const QCString & s )

DESCRIPTION
       The QCString class provides an abstraction of the classic C zero-terminated char array
       (char *).

       QCString inherits QByteArray, which is defined as QMemArray<char>. Since QCString is a
       QMemArray, it uses explicit sharing with a reference count.

       QCString tries to behave like a more convenient const char *. The price of doing this is
       that some algorithms will perform badly. For example, append() is O(length()) since it
       scans for a null terminator. Although you might use QCString for text that is never
       exposed to the user, for most purposes, and especially for user-visible text, you should
       use QString. QString provides implicit sharing, Unicode and other internationalization
       support, and is well optimized.

       Note that for the QCString methods that take a const char * parameter the const char *
       must either be 0 (null) or not-null and '&#92;0' (NUL byte) terminated; otherwise the
       results are undefined.

       A QCString that has not been assigned to anything is null, i.e. both the length and the
       data pointer is 0. A QCString that references the empty string ("", a single '&#92;0'
       char) is empty. Both null and empty QCStrings are legal parameters to the methods.
       Assigning const char * 0 to QCString produces a null QCString.

       The length() function returns the length of the string; resize() resizes the string and
       truncate() truncates the string. A string can be filled with a character using fill().
       Strings can be left or right padded with characters using leftJustify() and
       rightJustify(). Characters, strings and regular expressions can be searched for using
       find() and findRev(), and counted using contains().

       Strings and characters can be inserted with insert() and appended with append(). A string
       can be prepended with prepend(). Characters can be removed from the string with remove()
       and replaced with replace().

       Portions of a string can be extracted using left(), right() and mid(). Whitespace can be
       removed using stripWhiteSpace() and simplifyWhiteSpace(). Strings can be converted to
       uppercase or lowercase with upper() and lower() respectively.

       Strings that contain numbers can be converted to numbers with toShort(), toInt(),
       toLong(), toULong(), toFloat() and toDouble(). Numbers can be converted to strings with
       setNum().

       Many operators are overloaded to work with QCStrings. QCString also supports some more
       obscure functions, e.g. sprintf(), setStr() and setExpand().

       <blockquote><p align="center"> Note on Character Comparisons

       In QCString the notion of uppercase and lowercase and of which character is greater than
       or less than another character is locale dependent. This affects functions which support a
       case insensitive option or which compare or lowercase or uppercase their arguments. Case
       insensitive operations and comparisons will be accurate if both strings contain only ASCII
       characters. (If $LC_CTYPE is set, most Unix systems do "the right thing".) Functions that
       this affects include contains(), find(), findRev(), operator<(), operator<=(),
       operator>(), operator>=(), lower() and upper().

       This issue does not apply to QStrings since they represent characters using Unicode.
       </blockquote>

       Performance note: The QCString methods for QRegExp searching are implemented by converting
       the QCString to a QString and performing the search on that. This implies a deep copy of
       the QCString data. If you are going to perform many QRegExp searches on a large QCString,
       you will get better performance by converting the QCString to a QString yourself, and then
       searching in the QString.

       See also Collection Classes, Implicitly and Explicitly Shared Classes, Text Related
       Classes, and Non-GUI Classes.

MEMBER FUNCTION DOCUMENTATION
QCString::QCString ()
       Constructs a null string.

       See also isNull().

QCString::QCString ( int size )
       Constructs a string with room for size characters, including the '&#92;0'-terminator.
       Makes a null string if size == 0.

       If size > 0, then the first and last characters in the string are initialized to '&#92;0'.
       All other characters are uninitialized.

       See also resize() and isNull().

QCString::QCString ( const QCString & s )
       Constructs a shallow copy s.

       See also assign().

QCString::QCString ( const char * str )
       Constructs a string that is a deep copy of str.

       If str is 0 a null string is created.

       See also isNull().

QCString::QCString ( const char * str, uint maxsize )
       Constructs a string that is a deep copy of str. The copy will be at most maxsize bytes
       long including the '&#92;0'-terminator.

       Example:

	   QCString str( "helloworld", 6 ); // assigns "hello" to str

       If str contains a 0 byte within the first maxsize bytes, the resulting QCString will be
       terminated by this 0. If str is 0 a null string is created.

       See also isNull().

QCString &; QCString::append ( const char * str )
       Appends string str to the string and returns a reference to the string. Equivalent to
       operator+=().

int QCString::contains ( char c, bool cs = TRUE ) const
       Returns the number of times the character c occurs in the string.

       The match is case sensitive if cs is TRUE, or case insensitive if cs if FALSE.

       See also Note on character comparisons.

int QCString::contains ( const char * str, bool cs = TRUE ) const
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns the number of times str occurs in the string.

       The match is case sensitive if cs is TRUE, or case insensitive if cs if FALSE.

       This function counts overlapping substrings, for example, "banana" contains two
       occurrences of "ana".

       See also findRev() and Note on character comparisons.

int QCString::contains ( const QRegExp & rx ) const
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Counts the number of overlapping occurrences of rx in the string.

       Example:

	   QString s = "banana and panama";
	   QRegExp r = QRegExp( "a[nm]a", TRUE, FALSE );
	   s.contains( r ); // 4 matches

       See also find() and findRev().

       Warning: If you want to apply this function repeatedly to the same string it is more
       efficient to convert the string to a QString and apply the function to that.

QCString QCString::copy () const
       Returns a deep copy of this string.

       See also detach().

bool QCString::fill ( char c, int len = -1 )
       Fills the string with len bytes of character c, followed by a '&#92;0'-terminator.

       If len is negative, then the current string length is used.

       Returns FALSE is len is nonnegative and there is not enough memory to resize the string;
       otherwise returns TRUE.

int QCString::find ( char c, int index = 0, bool cs = TRUE ) const
       Finds the first occurrence of the character c, starting at position index.

       The search is case sensitive if cs is TRUE, or case insensitive if cs is FALSE.

       Returns the position of c, or -1 if c could not be found.

       See also Note on character comparisons.

       Example: network/networkprotocol/nntp.cpp.

int QCString::find ( const char * str, int index = 0, bool cs = TRUE ) const
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Finds the first occurrence of the string str, starting at position index.

       The search is case sensitive if cs is TRUE, or case insensitive if cs is FALSE.

       Returns the position of str, or -1 if str could not be found.

       See also Note on character comparisons.

int QCString::find ( const QRegExp & rx, int index = 0 ) const
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Finds the first occurrence of the regular expression rx, starting at position index.

       Returns the position of the next match, or -1 if rx was not found.

       Warning: If you want to apply this function repeatedly to the same string it is more
       efficient to convert the string to a QString and apply the function to that.

int QCString::findRev ( char c, int index = -1, bool cs = TRUE ) const
       Finds the first occurrence of the character c, starting at position index and searching
       backwards.

       The search is case sensitive if cs is TRUE, or case insensitive if cs is FALSE.

       Returns the position of c, or -1 if c could not be found.

       See also Note on character comparisons.

int QCString::findRev ( const char * str, int index = -1, bool cs = TRUE ) const
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Finds the first occurrence of the string str, starting at position index and searching
       backwards.

       The search is case sensitive if cs is TRUE, or case insensitive if cs is FALSE.

       Returns the position of str, or -1 if str could not be found.

       See also Note on character comparisons.

int QCString::findRev ( const QRegExp & rx, int index = -1 ) const
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Finds the first occurrence of the regular expression rx, starting at position index and
       searching backwards.

       Returns the position of the next match (backwards), or -1 if rx was not found.

       Warning: If you want to apply this function repeatedly to the same string it is more
       efficient to convert the string to a QString and apply the function to that.

QCString &; QCString::insert ( uint index, char c )
       Inserts character c into the string at position index and returns a reference to the
       string.

       If index is beyond the end of the string, the string is padded with spaces (ASCII 32) to
       length index and then c is appended.

       Example:

	   QCString s = "Yes";
	   s.insert( 3, '!');	// s == "Yes!"

       See also remove() and replace().

QCString &; QCString::insert ( uint index, const char * s )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Inserts string s into the string at position index.

       If index is beyond the end of the string, the string is padded with spaces (ASCII 32) to
       length index and then s is appended.

	   QCString s = "I like fish";
	   s.insert( 2, "don't ");     // s == "I don't like fish"
	   s = "x";		       // index 01234
	   s.insert( 3, "yz" );        // s == "x  yz"

bool QCString::isEmpty () const
       Returns TRUE if the string is empty, i.e. if length() == 0; otherwise returns FALSE. An
       empty string is not always a null string.

       See example in isNull().

       See also isNull(), length(), and size().

bool QCString::isNull () const
       Returns TRUE if the string is null, i.e. if data() == 0; otherwise returns FALSE. A null
       string is also an empty string.

       Example:

	   QCString a;	       // a.data() == 0,  a.size() == 0, a.length() == 0
	   QCString b == "";   // b.data() == "", b.size() == 1, b.length() == 0
	   a.isNull();	       // TRUE	because a.data() == 0
	   a.isEmpty();        // TRUE	because a.length() == 0
	   b.isNull();	       // FALSE because b.data() == ""
	   b.isEmpty();        // TRUE	because b.length() == 0

       See also isEmpty(), length(), and size().

QCString QCString::left ( uint len ) const
       Returns a substring that contains the len leftmost characters of the string.

       The whole string is returned if len exceeds the length of the string.

       Example:

	   QCString s = "Pineapple";
	   QCString t = s.left( 4 );  // t == "Pine"

       See also right() and mid().

       Example: network/networkprotocol/nntp.cpp.

QCString QCString::leftJustify ( uint width, char fill = ' ', bool truncate = FALSE ) const
       Returns a string of length width (plus one for the terminating '&#92;0') that contains
       this string padded with the fill character.

       If the length of the string exceeds width and truncate is FALSE (the default), then the
       returned string is a copy of the string. If the length of the string exceeds width and
       truncate is TRUE, then the returned string is a left(width).

       Example:

	   QCString s("apple");
	   QCString t = s.leftJustify(8, '.');	// t == "apple..."

       See also rightJustify().

uint QCString::length () const
       Returns the length of the string, excluding the '&#92;0'-terminator. Equivalent to calling
       strlen(data()).

       Null strings and empty strings have zero length.

       See also size(), isNull(), and isEmpty().

       Example: network/networkprotocol/nntp.cpp.

QCString QCString::lower () const
       Returns a new string that is a copy of this string converted to lower case.

       Example:

	   QCString s("Credit");
	   QCString t = s.lower();  // t == "credit"

       See also upper() and Note on character comparisons.

QCString QCString::mid ( uint index, uint len = 0xffffffff ) const
       Returns a substring that contains at most len characters from this string, starting at
       position index.

       Returns a null string if the string is empty or if index is out of range. Returns the
       whole string from index if index+len exceeds the length of the string.

       Example:

	   QCString s = "Two pineapples";
	   QCString t = s.mid( 4, 3 );	   // t == "pin"

       See also left() and right().

       Example: network/networkprotocol/nntp.cpp.

QCString::operator const char * () const
       Returns the string data.

QCString &; QCString::operator+= ( const char * str )
       Appends string str to the string and returns a reference to the string.

QCString &; QCString::operator+= ( char c )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Appends character c to the string and returns a reference to the string.

QCString &; QCString::operator= ( const QCString & s )
       Assigns a shallow copy of s to this string and returns a reference to this string.

QCString &; QCString::operator= ( const char * str )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Assigns a deep copy of str to this string and returns a reference to this string.

       If str is 0 a null string is created.

       See also isNull().

QCString &; QCString::prepend ( const char * s )
       Prepend s to the string. Equivalent to insert(0, s).

       See also insert().

QCString &; QCString::remove ( uint index, uint len )
       Removes len characters from the string, starting at position index, and returns a
       reference to the string.

       If index is out of range, nothing happens. If index is valid, but index + len is larger
       than the length of the string, the string is truncated at position index.

	   QCString s = "Montreal";
	   s.remove( 1, 4 );	     // s == "Meal"

       See also insert() and replace().

       Example: network/networkprotocol/nntp.cpp.

QCString &; QCString::replace ( uint index, uint len, const char * str )
       Replaces len characters from the string, starting at position index, with str, and returns
       a reference to the string.

       If index is out of range, nothing is removed and str is appended at the end of the string.
       If index is valid, but index + len is larger than the length of the string, str replaces
       the rest of the string from position index.

	   QCString s = "Say yes!";
	   s.replace( 4, 3, "NO" );  // s == "Say NO!"

       See also insert() and remove().

QCString &; QCString::replace ( const QRegExp & rx, const char * str )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Replaces every occurrence of rx in the string with str. Returns a reference to the string.

       Example:

	   QString s = "banana";
	   s.replace( QRegExp("a.*a"), "" );	 // becomes "b"
	   s = "banana";
	   s.replace( QRegExp("^[bn]a"), "X" );  // becomes "Xnana"
	   s = "banana";
	   s.replace( QRegExp("^[bn]a"), "" );	 // becomes "nana"

       Warning: If you want to apply this function repeatedly to the same string it is more
       efficient to convert the string to a QString and apply the function to that.

QCString &; QCString::replace ( char c, const char * after )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Replaces every occurrence of the character c in the string with after. Returns a reference
       to the string.

       Example:

	   QCString s = "a,b,c";
	   s.replace( ',', " or " );
	   // s == "a or b or c"

QCString &; QCString::replace ( const char * before, const char * after )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Replaces every occurrence of the string before in the string with the string after.
       Returns a reference to the string.

       Example:

	   QCString s = "Greek is Greek";
	   s.replace( "Greek", "English" );
	   // s == "English is English"

QCString &; QCString::replace ( char c1, char c2 )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Replaces every occurrence of c1 with the char c2. Returns a reference to the string.

bool QCString::resize ( uint len )
       Extends or shrinks the string to len bytes, including the '&#92;0'-terminator.

       A '&#92;0'-terminator is set at position len - 1 unless len == 0.

       Example:

	   QCString s = "resize this string";
	   s.resize( 7 );		       // s == "resize"

       See also truncate().

       Example: network/networkprotocol/nntp.cpp.

QCString QCString::right ( uint len ) const
       Returns a substring that contains the len rightmost characters of the string.

       The whole string is returned if len exceeds the length of the string.

       Example:

	   QCString s = "Pineapple";
	   QCString t = s.right( 5 );  // t == "apple"

       See also left() and mid().

       Example: network/networkprotocol/nntp.cpp.

QCString QCString::rightJustify ( uint width, char fill = ' ', bool truncate = FALSE ) const
       Returns a string of length width (plus one for the terminating '&#92;0') that contains
       zero or more of the fill character followed by this string.

       If the length of the string exceeds width and truncate is FALSE (the default), then the
       returned string is a copy of the string. If the length of the string exceeds width and
       truncate is TRUE, then the returned string is a left(width).

       Example:

	   QCString s("pie");
	   QCString t = s.rightJustify(8, '.');  // t == ".....pie"

       See also leftJustify().

bool QCString::setExpand ( uint index, char c )
       Sets the character at position index to c and expands the string if necessary, padding
       with spaces.

       Returns FALSE if index was out of range and the string could not be expanded; otherwise
       returns TRUE.

QCString &; QCString::setNum ( double n, char f = 'g', int prec = 6 )
       Sets the string to the string representation of the number n and returns a reference to
       the string.

       The format of the string representation is specified by the format character f, and the
       precision (number of digits after the decimal point) is specified with prec.

       The valid formats for f are 'e', 'E', 'f', 'g' and 'G'. The formats are the same as for
       sprintf(); they are explained in QString::arg().

QCString &; QCString::setNum ( short n )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Sets the string to the string representation of the number n and returns a reference to
       the string.

QCString &; QCString::setNum ( ushort n )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Sets the string to the string representation of the number n and returns a reference to
       the string.

QCString &; QCString::setNum ( int n )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Sets the string to the string representation of the number n and returns a reference to
       the string.

QCString &; QCString::setNum ( uint n )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Sets the string to the string representation of the number n and returns a reference to
       the string.

QCString &; QCString::setNum ( long n )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Sets the string to the string representation of the number n and returns a reference to
       the string.

QCString &; QCString::setNum ( ulong n )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Sets the string to the string representation of the number n and returns a reference to
       the string.

QCString &; QCString::setNum ( float n, char f = 'g', int prec = 6 )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

QCString &; QCString::setStr ( const char * str )
       Makes a deep copy of str. Returns a reference to the string.

QCString QCString::simplifyWhiteSpace () const
       Returns a new string that has white space removed from the start and the end, plus any
       sequence of internal white space replaced with a single space (ASCII 32).

       White space means the decimal ASCII codes 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 32.

	   QCString s = "  lots\t of\nwhite    space ";
	   QCString t = s.simplifyWhiteSpace(); // t == "lots of white space"

       See also stripWhiteSpace().

QCString &; QCString::sprintf ( const char * format, ... )
       Implemented as a call to the native vsprintf() (see the manual for your C library).

       If the string is shorter than 256 characters, this sprintf() calls resize(256) to decrease
       the chance of memory corruption. The string is resized back to its actual length before
       sprintf() returns.

       Example:

	   QCString s;
	   s.sprintf( "%d - %s", 1, "first" );	       // result < 256 chars
	   QCString big( 25000 );		       // very long string
	   big.sprintf( "%d - %s", 2, longString );    // result < 25000 chars

       Warning: All vsprintf() implementations will write past the end of the target string
       (*this) if the format specification and arguments happen to be longer than the target
       string, and some will also fail if the target string is longer than some arbitrary
       implementation limit.

       Giving user-supplied arguments to sprintf() is risky: Sooner or later someone will paste a
       huge line into your application.

QCString QCString::stripWhiteSpace () const
       Returns a new string that has white space removed from the start and the end.

       White space means the decimal ASCII codes 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 32.

       Example:

	   QCString s = " space ";
	   QCString t = s.stripWhiteSpace();	       // t == "space"

       See also simplifyWhiteSpace().

double QCString::toDouble ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       Returns the string converted to a double value.

       If ok is not 0: *ok is set to FALSE if the string is not a number, or if it has trailing
       garbage; otherwise *ok is set to TRUE.

float QCString::toFloat ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       Returns the string converted to a float value.

       If ok is not 0: *ok is set to FALSE if the string is not a number, or if it has trailing
       garbage; otherwise *ok is set to TRUE.

int QCString::toInt ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       Returns the string converted to a int value.

       If ok is not 0: *ok is set to FALSE if the string is not a number, or if it has trailing
       garbage; otherwise *ok is set to TRUE.

long QCString::toLong ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       Returns the string converted to a long value.

       If ok is not 0: *ok is set to FALSE if the string is not a number, or if it has trailing
       garbage; otherwise *ok is set to TRUE.

short QCString::toShort ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       Returns the string converted to a short value.

       If ok is not 0: *ok is set to FALSE if the string is not a number, is out of range, or if
       it has trailing garbage; otherwise *ok is set to TRUE.

uint QCString::toUInt ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       Returns the string converted to an unsigned int value.

       If ok is not 0: *ok is set to FALSE if the string is not a number, or if it has trailing
       garbage; otherwise *ok is set to TRUE.

ulong QCString::toULong ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       Returns the string converted to an unsigned long value.

       If ok is not 0: *ok is set to FALSE if the string is not a number, or if it has trailing
       garbage; otherwise *ok is set to TRUE.

ushort QCString::toUShort ( bool * ok = 0 ) const
       Returns the string converted to an unsigned short value.

       If ok is not 0: *ok is set to FALSE if the string is not a number, is out of range, or if
       it has trailing garbage; otherwise *ok is set to TRUE.

bool QCString::truncate ( uint pos )
       Truncates the string at position pos.

       Equivalent to calling resize(pos+1).

       Example:

	   QCString s = "truncate this string";
	   s.truncate( 5 );			 // s == "trunc"

       See also resize().

QCString QCString::upper () const
       Returns a new string that is a copy of this string converted to upper case.

       Example:

	   QCString s( "Debit" );
	   QCString t = s.upper();  // t == "DEBIT"

       See also lower() and Note on character comparisons.

RELATED FUNCTION DOCUMENTATION
bool operator!= ( const QCString & s1, const QCString & s2 )
       Returns TRUE if s1 and s2 are different; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) != 0.

bool operator!= ( const QCString & s1, const char * s2 )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns TRUE if s1 and s2 are different; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) != 0.

bool operator!= ( const char * s1, const QCString & s2 )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns TRUE if s1 and s2 are different; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) != 0.

const QCString operator+ ( const QCString &; s1, const QCString & s2 )
       Returns a string which consists of the concatenation of s1 and s2.

const QCString operator+ ( const QCString &; s1, const char * s2 )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns a string which consists of the concatenation of s1 and s2.

const QCString operator+ ( const char * s1, const QCString &; s2 )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns a string which consists of the concatenation of s1 and s2.

const QCString operator+ ( const QCString &; s, char c )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns a string which consists of the concatenation of s and c.

const QCString operator+ ( char c, const QCString &; s )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns a string which consists of the concatenation of c and s.

bool operator<; ( const QCString & s1, const char * s2 )
       Returns TRUE if s1 is less than s2; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) < 0.

       See also Note on character comparisons.

bool operator<; ( const char * s1, const QCString & s2 )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns TRUE if s1 is less than s2; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) < 0.

       See also Note on character comparisons.

QDataStream &; operator<< ( QDataStream & s, const QCString & str )
       Writes string str to the stream s.

       See also Format of the QDataStream operators.

bool operator<;= ( const QCString & s1, const char * s2 )
       Returns TRUE if s1 is less than or equal to s2; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) <= 0.

       See also Note on character comparisons.

bool operator<;= ( const char * s1, const QCString & s2 )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns TRUE if s1 is less than or equal to s2; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) <= 0.

       See also Note on character comparisons.

bool operator== ( const QCString & s1, const QCString & s2 )
       Returns TRUE if s1 and s2 are equal; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) == 0.

bool operator== ( const QCString & s1, const char * s2 )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns TRUE if s1 and s2 are equal; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) == 0.

bool operator== ( const char * s1, const QCString & s2 )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns TRUE if s1 and s2 are equal; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) == 0.

bool operator>; ( const QCString & s1, const char * s2 )
       Returns TRUE if s1 is greater than s2; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) > 0.

       See also Note on character comparisons.

bool operator>; ( const char * s1, const QCString & s2 )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns TRUE if s1 is greater than s2; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) > 0.

       See also Note on character comparisons.

bool operator>;= ( const QCString & s1, const char * s2 )
       Returns TRUE if s1 is greater than or equal to s2; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) >= 0.

       See also Note on character comparisons.

bool operator>;= ( const char * s1, const QCString & s2 )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns TRUE if s1 is greater than or equal to s2; otherwise returns FALSE.

       Equivalent to qstrcmp(s1, s2) >= 0.

       See also Note on character comparisons.

QDataStream &; operator>> ( QDataStream & s, QCString & str )
       Reads a string into str from the stream s.

       See also Format of the QDataStream operators.

void * qmemmove ( void * dst, const void * src, uint len )
       This function is normally part of the C library. Qt implements memmove() for platforms
       that do not provide it.

       memmove() copies len bytes from src into dst. The data is copied correctly even if src and
       dst overlap.

int qstrcmp ( const char * str1, const char * str2 )
       A safe strcmp() function.

       Compares str1 and str2. Returns a negative value if str1 is less than str2, 0 if str1 is
       equal to str2 or a positive value if str1 is greater than str2.

       Special case I: Returns 0 if str1 and str2 are both 0.

       Special case II: Returns a random nonzero value if str1 is 0 or str2 is 0 (but not both).

       See also qstrncmp(), qstricmp(), qstrnicmp(), and Note on character comparisons.

char * qstrcpy ( char * dst, const char * src )
       A safe strcpy() function.

       Copies all characters up to and including the '&#92;0' from src into dst and returns a
       pointer to dst.

char * qstrdup ( const char * src )
       Returns a duplicate string.

       Allocates space for a copy of src, copies it, and returns a pointer to the copy. If src is
       0, it immediately returns 0.

       The returned string must be deleted using delete[].

int qstricmp ( const char * str1, const char * str2 )
       A safe stricmp() function.

       Compares str1 and str2 ignoring the case.

       Returns a negative value if str1 is less than str2, 0 if str1 is equal to str2 or a
       positive value if str1 is greater than str2.

       Special case I: Returns 0 if str1 and str2 are both 0.

       Special case II: Returns a random nonzero value if str1 is 0 or str2 is 0 (but not both).

       See also qstrcmp(), qstrncmp(), qstrnicmp(), and Note on character comparisons.

uint qstrlen ( const char * str )
       A safe strlen function.

       Returns the number of characters that precede the terminating '&#92;0'. or 0 if str is 0.

int qstrncmp ( const char * str1, const char * str2, uint len )
       A safe strncmp() function.

       Compares at most len bytes of str1 and str2.

       Returns a negative value if str1 is less than str2, 0 if str1 is equal to str2 or a
       positive value if str1 is greater than str2.

       Special case I: Returns 0 if str1 and str2 are both 0.

       Special case II: Returns a random nonzero value if str1 is 0 or str2 is 0 (but not both).

       See also qstrcmp(), qstricmp(), qstrnicmp(), and Note on character comparisons.

char * qstrncpy ( char * dst, const char * src, uint len )
       A safe strncpy() function.

       Copies at most len bytes from src (stopping at len or the terminating '&#92;0' whichever
       comes first) into dst and returns a pointer to dst. Guarantees that dst is
       '&#92;0'-terminated. If src or dst is 0, returns 0 immediately.

       See also qstrcpy().

int qstrnicmp ( const char * str1, const char * str2, uint len )
       A safe strnicmp() function.

       Compares at most len bytes of str1 and str2 ignoring the case.

       Returns a negative value if str1 is less than str2, 0 if str1 is equal to str2 or a
       positive value if str1 is greater than str2.

       Special case I: Returns 0 if str1 and str2 are both 0.

       Special case II: Returns a random nonzero value if str1 is 0 or str2 is 0 (but not both).

       See also qstrcmp(), qstrncmp(), qstricmp(), and Note on character comparisons.

SEE ALSO
       http://doc.trolltech.com/qcstring.html http://www.trolltech.com/faq/tech.html

COPYRIGHT
       Copyright 1992-2007 Trolltech ASA, http://www.trolltech.com.  See the license file
       included in the distribution for a complete license statement.

AUTHOR
       Generated automatically from the source code.

BUGS
       If you find a bug in Qt, please report it as described in
       http://doc.trolltech.com/bughowto.html.	Good bug reports help us to help you. Thank you.

       The definitive Qt documentation is provided in HTML format; it is located at
       $QTDIR/doc/html and can be read using Qt Assistant or with a web browser. This man page is
       provided as a convenience for those users who prefer man pages, although this format is
       not officially supported by Trolltech.

       If you find errors in this manual page, please report them to qt-bugs@trolltech.com.
       Please include the name of the manual page (qcstring.3qt) and the Qt version (3.3.8).

Trolltech AS				 2 February 2007			    QCString(3qt)
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