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QApplication(3qt)								QApplication(3qt)

NAME
       QApplication - Manages the GUI application's control flow and main settings

SYNOPSIS
       #include <qapplication.h>

       Inherits QObject.

   Public Members
       QApplication ( int & argc, char ** argv )
       QApplication ( int & argc, char ** argv, bool GUIenabled )
       enum Type { Tty, GuiClient, GuiServer }
       QApplication ( int & argc, char ** argv, Type type )
       QApplication ( Display * dpy, HANDLE visual = 0, HANDLE colormap = 0 )
       QApplication ( Display * dpy, int argc, char ** argv, HANDLE visual = 0, HANDLE colormap =
	   0 )
       virtual ~QApplication ()
       int argc () const
       char ** argv () const
       Type type () const
       enum ColorSpec { NormalColor = 0, CustomColor = 1, ManyColor = 2 }
       QWidget * mainWidget () const
       virtual void setMainWidget ( QWidget * mainWidget )
       virtual void polish ( QWidget * w )
       QWidget * focusWidget () const
       QWidget * activeWindow () const
       int exec ()
       void processEvents ()
       void processEvents ( int maxtime )
       void processOneEvent ()	(obsolete)
       bool hasPendingEvents ()
       int enter_loop ()  (obsolete)
       void exit_loop ()  (obsolete)
       int loopLevel () const  (obsolete)
       virtual bool notify ( QObject * receiver, QEvent * e )
       void setDefaultCodec ( QTextCodec * codec )  (obsolete)
       QTextCodec * defaultCodec () const  (obsolete)
       void installTranslator ( QTranslator * mf )
       void removeTranslator ( QTranslator * mf )
       enum Encoding { DefaultCodec, UnicodeUTF8 }
       QString translate ( const char * context, const char * sourceText, const char * comment =
	   0, Encoding encoding = DefaultCodec ) const
       QString applicationDirPath ()
       QString applicationFilePath ()
       virtual bool macEventFilter ( EventHandlerCallRef, EventRef )
       virtual bool winEventFilter ( MSG * )
       virtual bool x11EventFilter ( XEvent * )
       int x11ProcessEvent ( XEvent * event )
       virtual bool qwsEventFilter ( QWSEvent * )
       void qwsSetCustomColors ( QRgb * colorTable, int start, int numColors )
       void winFocus ( QWidget * widget, bool gotFocus )
       bool isSessionRestored () const
       QString sessionId () const
       QString sessionKey () const
       virtual void commitData ( QSessionManager & sm )
       virtual void saveState ( QSessionManager & sm )
       void wakeUpGuiThread ()
       void lock ()
       void unlock ( bool wakeUpGui = TRUE )
       bool locked ()
       bool tryLock ()

   Public Slots
       void quit ()
       void closeAllWindows ()
       void aboutQt ()

   Signals
       void lastWindowClosed ()
       void aboutToQuit ()
       void guiThreadAwake ()

   Static Public Members
       QStyle & style ()
       void setStyle ( QStyle * style )
       QStyle * setStyle ( const QString & style )
       int colorSpec ()
       void setColorSpec ( int spec )
       QCursor * overrideCursor ()
       void setOverrideCursor ( const QCursor & cursor, bool replace = FALSE )
       void restoreOverrideCursor ()
       bool hasGlobalMouseTracking ()
       void setGlobalMouseTracking ( bool enable )
       QPalette palette ( const QWidget * w = 0 )
       void setPalette ( const QPalette & palette, bool informWidgets = FALSE, const char *
	   className = 0 )
       QFont font ( const QWidget * w = 0 )
       void setFont ( const QFont & font, bool informWidgets = FALSE, const char * className = 0
	   )
       QFontMetrics fontMetrics ()
       QWidgetList * allWidgets ()
       QWidgetList * topLevelWidgets ()
       QDesktopWidget * desktop ()
       QWidget * activePopupWidget ()
       QWidget * activeModalWidget ()
       QClipboard * clipboard ()
       QWidget * widgetAt ( int x, int y, bool child = FALSE )
       QWidget * widgetAt ( const QPoint & pos, bool child = FALSE )
       QEventLoop * eventLoop ()
       void exit ( int retcode = 0 )
       bool sendEvent ( QObject * receiver, QEvent * event )
       void postEvent ( QObject * receiver, QEvent * event )
       void sendPostedEvents ( QObject * receiver, int event_type )
       void sendPostedEvents ()
       void removePostedEvents ( QObject * receiver )
       bool startingUp ()
       bool closingDown ()
       void flushX ()
       void flush ()
       void syncX ()
       void beep ()
       void setWinStyleHighlightColor ( const QColor & c )  (obsolete)
       const QColor & winStyleHighlightColor ()  (obsolete)
       void setDesktopSettingsAware ( bool on )
       bool desktopSettingsAware ()
       void setCursorFlashTime ( int msecs )
       int cursorFlashTime ()
       void setDoubleClickInterval ( int ms )
       int doubleClickInterval ()
       void setWheelScrollLines ( int n )
       int wheelScrollLines ()
       void setGlobalStrut ( const QSize & strut )
       QSize globalStrut ()
       void setLibraryPaths ( const QStringList & paths )
       QStringList libraryPaths ()
       void addLibraryPath ( const QString & path )
       void removeLibraryPath ( const QString & path )
       void setStartDragTime ( int ms )
       int startDragTime ()
       void setStartDragDistance ( int l )
       int startDragDistance ()
       void setReverseLayout ( bool b )
       bool reverseLayout ()
       int horizontalAlignment ( int align )
       bool isEffectEnabled ( Qt::UIEffect effect )
       void setEffectEnabled ( Qt::UIEffect effect, bool enable = TRUE )
       QWSDecoration & qwsDecoration ()
       void qwsSetDecoration ( QWSDecoration * d )

RELATED FUNCTION DOCUMENTATION
       void qAddPostRoutine ( QtCleanUpFunction p )
       const char * qVersion ()
       bool qSysInfo ( int * wordSize, bool * bigEndian )
       void qDebug ( const char * msg, ... )
       void qWarning ( const char * msg, ... )
       void qFatal ( const char * msg, ... )
       void qSystemWarning ( const char * msg, int code )
       void Q_ASSERT ( bool test )
       void Q_CHECK_PTR ( void * p )
       QtMsgHandler qInstallMsgHandler ( QtMsgHandler h )

DESCRIPTION
       The QApplication class manages the GUI application's control flow and main settings.

       It contains the main event loop, where all events from the window system and other sources
       are processed and dispatched. It also handles the application's initialization and
       finalization, and provides session management. It also handles most system-wide and
       application-wide settings.

       For any GUI application that uses Qt, there is precisely one QApplication object, no
       matter whether the application has 0, 1, 2 or more windows at any time.

       The QApplication object is accessible through the global pointer qApp. Its main areas of
       responsibility are:

       It initializes the application with the user's desktop settings such as palette(), font()
       and doubleClickInterval(). It keeps track of these properties in case the user changes the
       desktop globally, for example through some kind of control panel.

       It performs event handling, meaning that it receives events from the underlying window
       system and dispatches them to the relevant widgets. By using sendEvent() and postEvent()
       you can send your own events to widgets.

       It parses common command line arguments and sets its internal state accordingly. See the
       constructor documentation below for more details about this.

       It defines the application's look and feel, which is encapsulated in a QStyle object. This
       can be changed at runtime with setStyle().

       It specifies how the application is to allocate colors. See setColorSpec() for details.

       It provides localization of strings that are visible to the user via translate().

       It provides some magical objects like the desktop() and the clipboard().

       It knows about the application's windows. You can ask which widget is at a certain
       position using widgetAt(), get a list of topLevelWidgets() and closeAllWindows(), etc.

       It manages the application's mouse cursor handling, see setOverrideCursor() and
       setGlobalMouseTracking().

       On the X window system, it provides functions to flush and sync the communication stream,
       see flushX() and syncX().

       It provides support for sophisticated session management. This makes it possible for
       applications to terminate gracefully when the user logs out, to cancel a shutdown process
       if termination isn't possible and even to preserve the entire application's state for a
       future session. See isSessionRestored(), sessionId() and commitData() and saveState() for
       details.

       The Application walk-through example contains a typical complete main() that does the
       usual things with QApplication.

       Since the QApplication object does so much initialization, it must be created before any
       other objects related to the user interface are created.

       Since it also deals with common command line arguments, it is usually a good idea to
       create it before any interpretation or modification of argv is done in the application
       itself. (Note also that for X11, setMainWidget() may change the main widget according to
       the -geometry option. To preserve this functionality, you must set your defaults before
       setMainWidget() and any overrides after.)

       <center>.nf

       </center>

       Non-GUI programs: While Qt is not optimized or designed for writing non-GUI programs, it's
       possible to use some of its classes without creating a QApplication. This can be useful if
       you wish to share code between a non-GUI server and a GUI client.

       See also Main Window and Related Classes.

   Member Type Documentation
QApplication::ColorSpec
       QApplication::NormalColor - the default color allocation policy

       QApplication::CustomColor - the same as NormalColor for X11; allocates colors to a palette
       on demand under Windows

       QApplication::ManyColor - the right choice for applications that use thousands of colors

       See setColorSpec() for full details.

QApplication::Encoding
       This enum type defines the 8-bit encoding of character string arguments to translate():

       QApplication::DefaultCodec - the encoding specified by QTextCodec::codecForTr() (Latin-1
       if none has been set)

       QApplication::UnicodeUTF8 - UTF-8

       See also QObject::tr(), QObject::trUtf8(), and QString::fromUtf8().

QApplication::Type
       QApplication::Tty - a console application

       QApplication::GuiClient - a GUI client application

       QApplication::GuiServer - a GUI server application

MEMBER FUNCTION DOCUMENTATION
QApplication::QApplication ( int & argc, char ** argv )
       Initializes the window system and constructs an application object with argc command line
       arguments in argv.

       The global qApp pointer refers to this application object. Only one application object
       should be created.

       This application object must be constructed before any paint devices (including widgets,
       pixmaps, bitmaps etc.).

       Note that argc and argv might be changed. Qt removes command line arguments that it
       recognizes. The modified argc and argv can also be accessed later with qApp->argc() and
       qApp->argv(). The documentation for argv() contains a detailed description of how to
       process command line arguments.

       Qt debugging options (not available if Qt was compiled with the QT_NO_DEBUG flag defined):

       -nograb, tells Qt that it must never grab the mouse or the keyboard.

       -dograb (only under X11), running under a debugger can cause an implicit -nograb, use
       -dograb to override.

       -sync (only under X11), switches to synchronous mode for debugging.

       See Debugging Techniques for a more detailed explanation.

       All Qt programs automatically support the following command line options:

       -reverse causes text to be formatted for right-to-left languages rather than in the usual
       left-to-right direction.

       -style= style, sets the application GUI style. Possible values are motif, windows, and
       platinum. If you compiled Qt with additional styles or have additional styles as plugins
       these will be available to the -style command line option.

       -style style, is the same as listed above.

       -session= session, restores the application from an earlier session.

       -session session, is the same as listed above.

       -widgetcount, prints debug message at the end about number of widgets left undestroyed and
       maximum number of widgets existed at the same time

       The X11 version of Qt also supports some traditional X11 command line options:

       -display display, sets the X display (default is $DISPLAY).

       -geometry geometry, sets the client geometry of the main widget.

       -fn or -font font, defines the application font. The font should be specified using an X
       logical font description.

       -bg or -background color, sets the default background color and an application palette
       (light and dark shades are calculated).

       -fg or -foreground color, sets the default foreground color.

       -btn or -button color, sets the default button color.

       -name name, sets the application name.

       -title title, sets the application title (caption).

       -visual TrueColor, forces the application to use a TrueColor visual on an 8-bit display.

       -ncols count, limits the number of colors allocated in the color cube on an 8-bit display,
       if the application is using the QApplication::ManyColor color specification. If count is
       216 then a 6x6x6 color cube is used (i.e. 6 levels of red, 6 of green, and 6 of blue); for
       other values, a cube approximately proportional to a 2x3x1 cube is used.

       -cmap, causes the application to install a private color map on an 8-bit display.

       See also argc() and argv().

QApplication::QApplication ( int & argc, char ** argv, bool GUIenabled )
       Constructs an application object with argc command line arguments in argv. If GUIenabled
       is TRUE, a GUI application is constructed, otherwise a non-GUI (console) application is
       created.

       Set GUIenabled to FALSE for programs without a graphical user interface that should be
       able to run without a window system.

       On X11, the window system is initialized if GUIenabled is TRUE. If GUIenabled is FALSE,
       the application does not connect to the X-server. On Windows and Macintosh, currently the
       window system is always initialized, regardless of the value of GUIenabled. This may
       change in future versions of Qt.

       The following example shows how to create an application that uses a graphical interface
       when available.

	 int main( int argc, char **argv )
	 {
       #ifdef Q_WS_X11
	   bool useGUI = getenv( "DISPLAY" ) != 0;
       #else
	   bool useGUI = TRUE;
       #endif
	   QApplication app(argc, argv, useGUI);
	   if ( useGUI ) {
	      //start GUI version
	      ...
	   } else {
	      //start non-GUI version
	      ...
	   }
	   return app.exec();
	 }

QApplication::QApplication ( int & argc, char ** argv, Type type )
       Constructs an application object with argc command line arguments in argv.

       For Qt/Embedded, passing QApplication::GuiServer for type makes this application the
       server (equivalent to running with the -qws option).

QApplication::QApplication ( Display * dpy, HANDLE visual = 0, HANDLE colormap = 0 )
       Create an application, given an already open display dpy. If visual and colormap are non-
       zero, the application will use those as the default Visual and Colormap contexts.

       Warning: Qt only supports TrueColor visuals at depths higher than 8 bits-per-pixel.

       This is available only on X11.

QApplication::QApplication ( Display * dpy, int argc, char ** argv, HANDLE visual = 0, HANDLE
       colormap = 0 )
       Create an application, given an already open display dpy and using argc command line
       arguments in argv. If visual and colormap are non-zero, the application will use those as
       the default Visual and Colormap contexts.

       Warning: Qt only supports TrueColor visuals at depths higher than 8 bits-per-pixel.

       This is available only on X11.

QApplication::~QApplication () [virtual]
       Cleans up any window system resources that were allocated by this application. Sets the
       global variable qApp to 0.

void QApplication::aboutQt () [slot]
       Displays a simple message box about Qt. The message includes the version number of Qt
       being used by the application.

       This is useful for inclusion in the Help menu of an application. See the
       examples/menu/menu.cpp example.

       This function is a convenience slot for QMessageBox::aboutQt().

void QApplication::aboutToQuit () [signal]
       This signal is emitted when the application is about to quit the main event loop, e.g.
       when the event loop level drops to zero. This may happen either after a call to quit()
       from inside the application or when the users shuts down the entire desktop session.

       The signal is particularly useful if your application has to do some last-second cleanup.
       Note that no user interaction is possible in this state.

       See also quit().

QWidget * QApplication::activeModalWidget () [static]
       Returns the active modal widget.

       A modal widget is a special top level widget which is a subclass of QDialog that specifies
       the modal parameter of the constructor as TRUE. A modal widget must be closed before the
       user can continue with other parts of the program.

       Modal widgets are organized in a stack. This function returns the active modal widget at
       the top of the stack.

       See also activePopupWidget() and topLevelWidgets().

QWidget * QApplication::activePopupWidget () [static]
       Returns the active popup widget.

       A popup widget is a special top level widget that sets the WType_Popup widget flag, e.g.
       the QPopupMenu widget. When the application opens a popup widget, all events are sent to
       the popup. Normal widgets and modal widgets cannot be accessed before the popup widget is
       closed.

       Only other popup widgets may be opened when a popup widget is shown. The popup widgets are
       organized in a stack. This function returns the active popup widget at the top of the
       stack.

       See also activeModalWidget() and topLevelWidgets().

QWidget * QApplication::activeWindow () const
       Returns the application top-level window that has the keyboard input focus, or 0 if no
       application window has the focus. Note that there might be an activeWindow() even if there
       is no focusWidget(), for example if no widget in that window accepts key events.

       See also QWidget::setFocus(), QWidget::focus, and focusWidget().

       Example: network/mail/smtp.cpp.

void QApplication::addLibraryPath ( const QString & path ) [static]
       Append path to the end of the library path list. If path is empty or already in the path
       list, the path list is not changed.

       The default path list consists of a single entry, the installation directory for plugins.
       The default installation directory for plugins is INSTALL/plugins, where INSTALL is the
       directory where Qt was installed.

       See also removeLibraryPath(), libraryPaths(), and setLibraryPaths().

QWidgetList * QApplication::allWidgets () [static]
       Returns a list of all the widgets in the application.

       The list is created using new and must be deleted by the caller.

       The list is empty (QPtrList::isEmpty()) if there are no widgets.

       Note that some of the widgets may be hidden.

       Example that updates all widgets:

	   QWidgetList	*list = QApplication::allWidgets();
	   QWidgetListIt it( *list );	      // iterate over the widgets
	   QWidget * w;
	   while ( (w=it.current()) != 0 ) {  // for each widget...
	       ++it;
	       w->update();
	   }
	   delete list; 		     // delete the list, not the widgets

       The QWidgetList class is defined in the qwidgetlist.h header file.

       Warning: Delete the list as soon as you have finished using it. The widgets in the list
       may be deleted by someone else at any time.

       See also topLevelWidgets(), QWidget::visible, and QPtrList::isEmpty().

QString QApplication::applicationDirPath ()
       Returns the directory that contains the application executable.

       For example, if you have installed Qt in the C:&#92;Trolltech&#92;Qt directory, and you
       run the demo example, this function will return "C:/Trolltech/Qt/examples/demo".

       On Mac OS X this will point to the directory actually containing the executable, which may
       be inside of an application bundle (if the application is bundled).

       Warning: On Unix, this function assumes that argv[0] contains the file name of the
       executable (which it normally does). It also assumes that the current directory hasn't
       been changed by the application.

       See also applicationFilePath().

QString QApplication::applicationFilePath ()
       Returns the file path of the application executable.

       For example, if you have installed Qt in the C:&#92;Trolltech&#92;Qt directory, and you
       run the demo example, this function will return "C:/Trolltech/Qt/examples/demo/demo.exe".

       Warning: On Unix, this function assumes that argv[0] contains the file name of the
       executable (which it normally does). It also assumes that the current directory hasn't
       been changed by the application.

       See also applicationDirPath().

int QApplication::argc () const
       Returns the number of command line arguments.

       The documentation for argv() describes how to process command line arguments.

       See also argv() and QApplication::QApplication().

       Examples:

char ** QApplication::argv () const
       Returns the command line argument vector.

       argv()[0] is the program name, argv()[1] is the first argument and argv()[argc()-1] is the
       last argument.

       A QApplication object is constructed by passing argc and argv from the main() function.
       Some of the arguments may be recognized as Qt options and removed from the argument
       vector. For example, the X11 version of Qt knows about -display, -font and a few more
       options.

       Example:

	       // showargs.cpp - displays program arguments in a list box
	       #include <qapplication.h>
	       #include <qlistbox.h>
	       int main( int argc, char **argv )
	       {
		   QApplication a( argc, argv );
		   QListBox b;
		   a.setMainWidget( &b );
		   for ( int i = 0; i < a.argc(); i++ )  // a.argc() == argc
		       b.insertItem( a.argv()[i] );	 // a.argv()[i] == argv[i]
		   b.show();
		   return a.exec();
	       }

       If you run showargs -display unix:0 -font 9x15bold hello world under X11, the list box
       contains the three strings "showargs"," hello" and "world".

       Qt provides a global pointer, qApp, that points to the QApplication object, and through
       which you can access argc() and argv() in functions other than main().

       See also argc() and QApplication::QApplication().

       Examples:

void QApplication::beep () [static]
       Sounds the bell, using the default volume and sound.

QClipboard * QApplication::clipboard () [static]
       Returns a pointer to the application global clipboard.

       Examples:

void QApplication::closeAllWindows () [slot]
       Closes all top-level windows.

       This function is particularly useful for applications with many top-level windows. It
       could, for example, be connected to a "Quit" entry in the file menu as shown in the
       following code example:

	   // the "Quit" menu entry should try to close all windows
	   QPopupMenu* file = new QPopupMenu( this );
	   file->insertItem( "&Quit", qApp, SLOT(closeAllWindows()), CTRL+Key_Q );
	   // when the last window is closed, the application should quit
	   connect( qApp, SIGNAL( lastWindowClosed() ), qApp, SLOT( quit() ) );

       The windows are closed in random order, until one window does not accept the close event.

       See also QWidget::close(), QWidget::closeEvent(), lastWindowClosed(), quit(),
       topLevelWidgets(), and QWidget::isTopLevel.

       Examples:

bool QApplication::closingDown () [static]
       Returns TRUE if the application objects are being destroyed; otherwise returns FALSE.

       See also startingUp().

int QApplication::colorSpec () [static]
       Returns the color specification.

       See also QApplication::setColorSpec().

       Example: showimg/showimg.cpp.

void QApplication::commitData ( QSessionManager & sm ) [virtual]
       This function deals with session management. It is invoked when the QSessionManager wants
       the application to commit all its data.

       Usually this means saving all open files, after getting permission from the user.
       Furthermore you may want to provide a means by which the user can cancel the shutdown.

       Note that you should not exit the application within this function. Instead, the session
       manager may or may not do this afterwards, depending on the context.

       Warning: Within this function, no user interaction is possible, unless you ask the session
       manager sm for explicit permission. See QSessionManager::allowsInteraction() and
       QSessionManager::allowsErrorInteraction() for details and example usage.

       The default implementation requests interaction and sends a close event to all visible top
       level widgets. If any event was rejected, the shutdown is canceled.

       See also isSessionRestored(), sessionId(), saveState(), and the Session Management
       overview.

int QApplication::cursorFlashTime () [static]
       Returns the text cursor's flash (blink) time in milliseconds. The flash time is the time
       required to display, invert and restore the caret display.

       The default value on X11 is 1000 milliseconds. On Windows, the control panel value is
       used.

       Widgets should not cache this value since it may be changed at any time by the user
       changing the global desktop settings.

       See also setCursorFlashTime().

QTextCodec * QApplication::defaultCodec () const
       This function is obsolete. It is provided to keep old source working. We strongly advise
       against using it in new code.

       Returns QTextCodec::codecForTr().

QDesktopWidget * QApplication::desktop () [static]
       Returns the desktop widget (also called the root window).

       The desktop widget is useful for obtaining the size of the screen. It may also be possible
       to draw on the desktop. We recommend against assuming that it's possible to draw on the
       desktop, since this does not work on all operating systems.

	   QDesktopWidget *d = QApplication::desktop();
	   int w = d->width();	   // returns desktop width
	   int h = d->height();    // returns desktop height

       Examples:

bool QApplication::desktopSettingsAware () [static]
       Returns the value set by setDesktopSettingsAware(); by default TRUE.

       See also setDesktopSettingsAware().

int QApplication::doubleClickInterval () [static]
       Returns the maximum duration for a double click.

       The default value on X11 is 400 milliseconds. On Windows, the control panel value is used.

       See also setDoubleClickInterval().

int QApplication::enter_loop ()
       This function is obsolete. It is provided to keep old source working. We strongly advise
       against using it in new code.

       This function enters the main event loop (recursively). Do not call it unless you really
       know what you are doing.

       Use QApplication::eventLoop()->enterLoop() instead.

QEventLoop * QApplication::eventLoop () [static]
       Returns the application event loop. This function will return zero if called during and
       after destroying QApplication.

       To create your own instance of QEventLoop or QEventLoop subclass create it before you
       create the QApplication object.

       See also QEventLoop.

       Example: distributor/distributor.ui.h.

int QApplication::exec ()
       Enters the main event loop and waits until exit() is called or the main widget is
       destroyed, and returns the value that was set to exit() (which is 0 if exit() is called
       via quit()).

       It is necessary to call this function to start event handling. The main event loop
       receives events from the window system and dispatches these to the application widgets.

       Generally speaking, no user interaction can take place before calling exec(). As a special
       case, modal widgets like QMessageBox can be used before calling exec(), because modal
       widgets call exec() to start a local event loop.

       To make your application perform idle processing, i.e. executing a special function
       whenever there are no pending events, use a QTimer with 0 timeout. More advanced idle
       processing schemes can be achieved using processEvents().

       See also quit(), exit(), processEvents(), and setMainWidget().

       Examples:

void QApplication::exit ( int retcode = 0 ) [static]
       Tells the application to exit with a return code.

       After this function has been called, the application leaves the main event loop and
       returns from the call to exec(). The exec() function returns retcode.

       By convention, a retcode of 0 means success, and any non-zero value indicates an error.

       Note that unlike the C library function of the same name, this function does return to the
       caller -- it is event processing that stops.

       See also quit() and exec().

       Examples:

void QApplication::exit_loop ()
       This function is obsolete. It is provided to keep old source working. We strongly advise
       against using it in new code.

       This function exits from a recursive call to the main event loop. Do not call it unless
       you are an expert.

       Use QApplication::eventLoop()->exitLoop() instead.

void QApplication::flush () [static]
       Flushes the window system specific event queues.

       If you are doing graphical changes inside a loop that does not return to the event loop on
       asynchronous window systems like X11 or double buffered window systems like MacOS X, and
       you want to visualize these changes immediately (e.g. Splash Screens), call this function.

       See also flushX(), sendPostedEvents(), and QPainter::flush().

void QApplication::flushX () [static]
       Flushes the X event queue in the X11 implementation. This normally returns almost
       immediately. Does nothing on other platforms.

       See also syncX().

       Example: xform/xform.cpp.

QWidget * QApplication::focusWidget () const
       Returns the application widget that has the keyboard input focus, or 0 if no widget in
       this application has the focus.

       See also QWidget::setFocus(), QWidget::focus, and activeWindow().

QFont QApplication::font ( const QWidget * w = 0 ) [static]
       Returns the default font for the widget w, or the default application font if w is 0.

       See also setFont(), fontMetrics(), and QWidget::font.

       Examples:

QFontMetrics QApplication::fontMetrics () [static]
       Returns display (screen) font metrics for the application font.

       See also font(), setFont(), QWidget::fontMetrics(), and QPainter::fontMetrics().

QSize QApplication::globalStrut () [static]
       Returns the application's global strut.

       The strut is a size object whose dimensions are the minimum that any GUI element that the
       user can interact with should have. For example no button should be resized to be smaller
       than the global strut size.

       See also setGlobalStrut().

void QApplication::guiThreadAwake () [signal]
       This signal is emitted after the event loop returns from a function that could block.

       See also wakeUpGuiThread().

bool QApplication::hasGlobalMouseTracking () [static]
       Returns TRUE if global mouse tracking is enabled; otherwise returns FALSE.

       See also setGlobalMouseTracking().

bool QApplication::hasPendingEvents ()
       This function returns TRUE if there are pending events; otherwise returns FALSE. Pending
       events can be either from the window system or posted events using
       QApplication::postEvent().

int QApplication::horizontalAlignment ( int align ) [static]
       Strips out vertical alignment flags and transforms an alignment align of AlignAuto into
       AlignLeft or AlignRight according to the language used. The other horizontal alignment
       flags are left untouched.

void QApplication::installTranslator ( QTranslator * mf )
       Adds the message file mf to the list of message files to be used for translations.

       Multiple message files can be installed. Translations are searched for in the last
       installed message file, then the one from last, and so on, back to the first installed
       message file. The search stops as soon as a matching translation is found.

       See also removeTranslator(), translate(), and QTranslator::load().

       Example: i18n/main.cpp.

bool QApplication::isEffectEnabled ( Qt::UIEffect effect ) [static]
       Returns TRUE if effect is enabled; otherwise returns FALSE.

       By default, Qt will try to use the desktop settings. Call setDesktopSettingsAware(FALSE)
       to prevent this.

       Note: All effects are disabled on screens running at less than 16-bit color depth.

       See also setEffectEnabled() and Qt::UIEffect.

bool QApplication::isSessionRestored () const
       Returns TRUE if the application has been restored from an earlier session; otherwise
       returns FALSE.

       See also sessionId(), commitData(), and saveState().

void QApplication::lastWindowClosed () [signal]
       This signal is emitted when the user has closed the last top level window.

       The signal is very useful when your application has many top level widgets but no main
       widget. You can then connect it to the quit() slot.

       For convenience, this signal is not emitted for transient top level widgets such as popup
       menus and dialogs.

       See also mainWidget(), topLevelWidgets(), QWidget::isTopLevel, and QWidget::close().

       Examples:

QStringList QApplication::libraryPaths () [static]
       Returns a list of paths that the application will search when dynamically loading
       libraries. The installation directory for plugins is the only entry if no paths have been
       set. The default installation directory for plugins is INSTALL/plugins, where INSTALL is
       the directory where Qt was installed. The directory of the application executable (NOT the
       working directory) is also added to the plugin paths.

       If you want to iterate over the list, you should iterate over a copy, e.g.

	   QStringList list = app.libraryPaths();
	   QStringList::Iterator it = list.begin();
	   while( it != list.end() ) {
	       myProcessing( *it );
	       ++it;
	   }

       See the plugins documentation for a description of how the library paths are used.

       See also setLibraryPaths(), addLibraryPath(), removeLibraryPath(), and QLibrary.

void QApplication::lock ()
       Lock the Qt Library Mutex. If another thread has already locked the mutex, the calling
       thread will block until the other thread has unlocked the mutex.

       See also unlock(), locked(), and Thread Support in Qt.

bool QApplication::locked ()
       Returns TRUE if the Qt Library Mutex is locked by a different thread; otherwise returns
       FALSE.

       Warning: Due to different implementations of recursive mutexes on the supported platforms,
       calling this function from the same thread that previously locked the mutex will give
       undefined results.

       See also lock(), unlock(), and Thread Support in Qt.

int QApplication::loopLevel () const
       This function is obsolete. It is provided to keep old source working. We strongly advise
       against using it in new code.

       Returns the current loop level.

       Use QApplication::eventLoop()->loopLevel() instead.

bool QApplication::macEventFilter ( EventHandlerCallRef, EventRef ) [virtual]
       This virtual function is only implemented under Macintosh.

       If you create an application that inherits QApplication and reimplement this function, you
       get direct access to all Carbon Events that are received from the MacOS.

       Return TRUE if you want to stop the event from being processed. Return FALSE for normal
       event dispatching.

QWidget * QApplication::mainWidget () const
       Returns the main application widget, or 0 if there is no main widget.

       See also setMainWidget().

bool QApplication::notify ( QObject * receiver, QEvent * e ) [virtual]
       Sends event e to receiver: receiver->event(e). Returns the value that is returned from the
       receiver's event handler.

       For certain types of events (e.g. mouse and key events), the event will be propagated to
       the receiver's parent and so on up to the top-level object if the receiver is not
       interested in the event (i.e., it returns FALSE).

       There are five different ways that events can be processed; reimplementing this virtual
       function is just one of them. All five approaches are listed below: <ol type=1>

       Reimplementing this function. This is very powerful, providing complete control; but only
       one subclass can be qApp.

       Installing an event filter on qApp. Such an event filter is able to process all events for
       all widgets, so it's just as powerful as reimplementing notify(); furthermore, it's
       possible to have more than one application-global event filter. Global event filters even
       see mouse events for disabled widgets, and if global mouse tracking is enabled, as well as
       mouse move events for all widgets.

       Reimplementing QObject::event() (as QWidget does). If you do this you get Tab key presses,
       and you get to see the events before any widget-specific event filters.

       Installing an event filter on the object. Such an event filter gets all the events except
       Tab and Shift-Tab key presses.

       Reimplementing paintEvent(), mousePressEvent() and so on. This is the commonest, easiest
       and least powerful way.

       See also QObject::event() and installEventFilter().

QCursor * QApplication::overrideCursor () [static]
       Returns the active application override cursor.

       This function returns 0 if no application cursor has been defined (i.e. the internal
       cursor stack is empty).

       See also setOverrideCursor() and restoreOverrideCursor().

QPalette QApplication::palette ( const QWidget * w = 0 ) [static]
       Returns the application palette.

       If a widget is passed in w, the default palette for the widget's class is returned. This
       may or may not be the application palette. In most cases there isn't a special palette for
       certain types of widgets, but one notable exception is the popup menu under Windows, if
       the user has defined a special background color for menus in the display settings.

       See also setPalette() and QWidget::palette.

       Examples:

void QApplication::polish ( QWidget * w ) [virtual]
       Initialization of the appearance of the widget w before it is first shown.

       Usually widgets call this automatically when they are polished. It may be used to do some
       style-based central customization of widgets.

       Note that you are not limited to the public functions of QWidget. Instead, based on meta
       information like QObject::className() you are able to customize any kind of widget.

       See also QStyle::polish(), QWidget::polish(), setPalette(), and setFont().

void QApplication::postEvent ( QObject * receiver, QEvent * event ) [static]
       Note: This function is thread-safe when Qt is built withthread support.</p> Adds the event
       event with the object receiver as the receiver of the event, to an event queue and returns
       immediately.

       The event must be allocated on the heap since the post event queue will take ownership of
       the event and delete it once it has been posted.

       When control returns to the main event loop, all events that are stored in the queue will
       be sent using the notify() function.

       See also sendEvent() and notify().

void QApplication::processEvents ()
       Processes pending events, for 3 seconds or until there are no more events to process,
       whichever is shorter.

       You can call this function occasionally when your program is busy performing a long
       operation (e.g. copying a file).

       See also exec(), QTimer, and QEventLoop::processEvents().

       Examples:

void QApplication::processEvents ( int maxtime )
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Processes pending events for maxtime milliseconds or until there are no more events to
       process, whichever is shorter.

       You can call this function occasionally when you program is busy doing a long operation
       (e.g. copying a file).

       See also exec(), QTimer, and QEventLoop::processEvents().

void QApplication::processOneEvent ()
       This function is obsolete. It is provided to keep old source working. We strongly advise
       against using it in new code.

       Waits for an event to occur, processes it, then returns.

       This function is useful for adapting Qt to situations where the event processing must be
       grafted onto existing program loops.

       Using this function in new applications may be an indication of design problems.

       See also processEvents(), exec(), and QTimer.

void QApplication::quit () [slot]
       Tells the application to exit with return code 0 (success). Equivalent to calling
       QApplication::exit( 0 ).

       It's common to connect the lastWindowClosed() signal to quit(), and you also often connect
       e.g. QButton::clicked() or signals in QAction, QPopupMenu or QMenuBar to it.

       Example:

	   QPushButton *quitButton = new QPushButton( "Quit" );
	   connect( quitButton, SIGNAL(clicked()), qApp, SLOT(quit()) );

       See also exit(), aboutToQuit(), lastWindowClosed(), and QAction.

       Examples:

QWSDecoration &; QApplication::qwsDecoration () [static]
       Return the QWSDecoration used for decorating windows.

       This method is non-portable. It is available only in Qt/Embedded.

       See also QWSDecoration.

bool QApplication::qwsEventFilter ( QWSEvent * ) [virtual]
       This virtual function is only implemented under Qt/Embedded.

       If you create an application that inherits QApplication and reimplement this function, you
       get direct access to all QWS (Q Window System) events that the are received from the QWS
       master process.

       Return TRUE if you want to stop the event from being processed. Return FALSE for normal
       event dispatching.

void QApplication::qwsSetCustomColors ( QRgb * colorTable, int start, int numColors )
       Set Qt/Embedded custom color table.

       Qt/Embedded on 8-bpp displays allocates a standard 216 color cube. The remaining 40 colors
       may be used by setting a custom color table in the QWS master process before any clients
       connect.

       colorTable is an array of up to 40 custom colors. start is the starting index (0-39) and
       numColors is the number of colors to be set (1-40).

       This method is non-portable. It is available only in Qt/Embedded.

void QApplication::qwsSetDecoration ( QWSDecoration * d ) [static]
       Set the QWSDecoration derived class to use for decorating the Qt/Embedded windows to d.

       This method is non-portable. It is available only in Qt/Embedded.

       See also QWSDecoration.

void QApplication::removeLibraryPath ( const QString & path ) [static]
       Removes path from the library path list. If path is empty or not in the path list, the
       list is not changed.

       See also addLibraryPath(), libraryPaths(), and setLibraryPaths().

void QApplication::removePostedEvents ( QObject * receiver ) [static]
       Note: This function is thread-safe when Qt is built withthread support.</p> Removes all
       events posted using postEvent() for receiver.

       The events are not dispatched, instead they are removed from the queue. You should never
       need to call this function. If you do call it, be aware that killing events may cause
       receiver to break one or more invariants.

void QApplication::removeTranslator ( QTranslator * mf )
       Removes the message file mf from the list of message files used by this application. (It
       does not delete the message file from the file system.)

       See also installTranslator(), translate(), and QObject::tr().

       Example: i18n/main.cpp.

void QApplication::restoreOverrideCursor () [static]
       Undoes the last setOverrideCursor().

       If setOverrideCursor() has been called twice, calling restoreOverrideCursor() will
       activate the first cursor set. Calling this function a second time restores the original
       widgets' cursors.

       See also setOverrideCursor() and overrideCursor().

       Examples:

bool QApplication::reverseLayout () [static]
       Returns TRUE if all dialogs and widgets will be laid out in a mirrored (right to left)
       fashion. Returns FALSE if dialogs and widgets will be laid out left to right.

       See also setReverseLayout().

void QApplication::saveState ( QSessionManager & sm ) [virtual]
       This function deals with session management. It is invoked when the session manager wants
       the application to preserve its state for a future session.

       For example, a text editor would create a temporary file that includes the current
       contents of its edit buffers, the location of the cursor and other aspects of the current
       editing session.

       Note that you should never exit the application within this function. Instead, the session
       manager may or may not do this afterwards, depending on the context. Futhermore, most
       session managers will very likely request a saved state immediately after the application
       has been started. This permits the session manager to learn about the application's
       restart policy.

       Warning: Within this function, no user interaction is possible, unless you ask the session
       manager sm for explicit permission. See QSessionManager::allowsInteraction() and
       QSessionManager::allowsErrorInteraction() for details.

       See also isSessionRestored(), sessionId(), commitData(), and the Session Management
       overview.

bool QApplication::sendEvent ( QObject * receiver, QEvent * event ) [static]
       Sends event event directly to receiver receiver, using the notify() function. Returns the
       value that was returned from the event handler.

       The event is not deleted when the event has been sent. The normal approach is to create
       the event on the stack, e.g.

	   QMouseEvent me( QEvent::MouseButtonPress, pos, 0, 0 );
	   QApplication::sendEvent( mainWindow, &me );
       If you create the event on the heap you must delete it.

       See also postEvent() and notify().

       Example: popup/popup.cpp.

void QApplication::sendPostedEvents ( QObject * receiver, int event_type ) [static]
       Immediately dispatches all events which have been previously queued with
       QApplication::postEvent() and which are for the object receiver and have the event type
       event_type.

       Note that events from the window system are not dispatched by this function, but by
       processEvents().

       If receiver is null, the events of event_type are sent for all objects. If event_type is
       0, all the events are sent for receiver.

void QApplication::sendPostedEvents () [static]
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Dispatches all posted events, i.e. empties the event queue.

QString QApplication::sessionId () const
       Returns the current session's identifier.

       If the application has been restored from an earlier session, this identifier is the same
       as it was in that previous session.

       The session identifier is guaranteed to be unique both for different applications and for
       different instances of the same application.

       See also isSessionRestored(), sessionKey(), commitData(), and saveState().

QString QApplication::sessionKey () const
       Returns the session key in the current session.

       If the application has been restored from an earlier session, this key is the same as it
       was when the previous session ended.

       The session key changes with every call of commitData() or saveState().

       See also isSessionRestored(), sessionId(), commitData(), and saveState().

void QApplication::setColorSpec ( int spec ) [static]
       Sets the color specification for the application to spec.

       The color specification controls how the application allocates colors when run on a
       display with a limited amount of colors, e.g. 8 bit / 256 color displays.

       The color specification must be set before you create the QApplication object.

       The options are:

       QApplication::NormalColor. This is the default color allocation strategy. Use this option
       if your application uses buttons, menus, texts and pixmaps with few colors. With this
       option, the application uses system global colors. This works fine for most applications
       under X11, but on Windows machines it may cause dithering of non-standard colors.

       QApplication::CustomColor. Use this option if your application needs a small number of
       custom colors. On X11, this option is the same as NormalColor. On Windows, Qt creates a
       Windows palette, and allocates colors to it on demand.

       QApplication::ManyColor. Use this option if your application is very color hungry (e.g. it
       requires thousands of colors). Under X11 the effect is:

       For 256-color displays which have at best a 256 color true color visual, the default
       visual is used, and colors are allocated from a color cube. The color cube is the 6x6x6
       (216 color) "Web palette"<sup>*</sup>, but the number of colors can be changed by the
       -ncols option. The user can force the application to use the true color visual with the
       -visual option.

       For 256-color displays which have a true color visual with more than 256 colors, use that
       visual. Silicon Graphics X servers have this feature, for example. They provide an 8 bit
       visual by default but can deliver true color when asked. On Windows, Qt creates a Windows
       palette, and fills it with a color cube.

       Be aware that the CustomColor and ManyColor choices may lead to colormap flashing: The
       foreground application gets (most) of the available colors, while the background windows
       will look less attractive.

       Example:

	 int main( int argc, char **argv )
	 {
	     QApplication::setColorSpec( QApplication::ManyColor );
	     QApplication a( argc, argv );
	     ...
	 }

       QColor provides more functionality for controlling color allocation and freeing up certain
       colors. See QColor::enterAllocContext() for more information.

       To check what mode you end up with, call QColor::numBitPlanes() once the QApplication
       object exists. A value greater than 8 (typically 16, 24 or 32) means true color.

       <sup>*</sup> The color cube used by Qt has 216 colors whose red, green, and blue
       components always have one of the following values: 0x00, 0x33, 0x66, 0x99, 0xCC, or 0xFF.

       See also colorSpec(), QColor::numBitPlanes(), and QColor::enterAllocContext().

       Examples:

void QApplication::setCursorFlashTime ( int msecs ) [static]
       Sets the text cursor's flash (blink) time to msecs milliseconds. The flash time is the
       time required to display, invert and restore the caret display. Usually the text cursor is
       displayed for msecs/2 milliseconds, then hidden for msecs/2 milliseconds, but this may
       vary.

       Note that on Microsoft Windows, calling this function sets the cursor flash time for all
       windows.

       See also cursorFlashTime().

void QApplication::setDefaultCodec ( QTextCodec * codec )
       This function is obsolete. It is provided to keep old source working. We strongly advise
       against using it in new code.

       This is the same as QTextCodec::setCodecForTr().

void QApplication::setDesktopSettingsAware ( bool on ) [static]
       By default, Qt will try to use the current standard colors, fonts etc., from the
       underlying window system's desktop settings, and use them for all relevant widgets. This
       behavior can be switched off by calling this function with on set to FALSE.

       This static function must be called before creating the QApplication object, like this:

	 int main( int argc, char** argv ) {
	   QApplication::setDesktopSettingsAware( FALSE ); // I know better than the user
	   QApplication myApp( argc, argv ); // Use default fonts & colors
	   ...
	 }

       See also desktopSettingsAware().

void QApplication::setDoubleClickInterval ( int ms ) [static]
       Sets the time limit that distinguishes a double click from two consecutive mouse clicks to
       ms milliseconds.

       Note that on Microsoft Windows, calling this function sets the double click interval for
       all windows.

       See also doubleClickInterval().

void QApplication::setEffectEnabled ( Qt::UIEffect effect, bool enable = TRUE ) [static]
       Enables the UI effect effect if enable is TRUE, otherwise the effect will not be used.

       Note: All effects are disabled on screens running at less than 16-bit color depth.

       See also isEffectEnabled(), Qt::UIEffect, and setDesktopSettingsAware().

void QApplication::setFont ( const QFont & font, bool informWidgets = FALSE, const char *
       className = 0 ) [static]
       Changes the default application font to font. If informWidgets is TRUE, then existing
       widgets are informed about the change and may adjust themselves to the new application
       setting. If informWidgets is FALSE, the change only affects newly created widgets. If
       className is passed, the change applies only to classes that inherit className (as
       reported by QObject::inherits()).

       On application start-up, the default font depends on the window system. It can vary
       depending on both the window system version and the locale. This function lets you
       override the default font; but overriding may be a bad idea because, for example, some
       locales need extra-large fonts to support their special characters.

       See also font(), fontMetrics(), and QWidget::font.

       Examples:

void QApplication::setGlobalMouseTracking ( bool enable ) [static]
       Enables global mouse tracking if enable is TRUE, or disables it if enable is FALSE.

       Enabling global mouse tracking makes it possible for widget event filters or application
       event filters to get all mouse move events, even when no button is depressed. This is
       useful for special GUI elements, e.g. tooltips.

       Global mouse tracking does not affect widgets and their mouseMoveEvent(). For a widget to
       get mouse move events when no button is depressed, it must do
       QWidget::setMouseTracking(TRUE).

       This function uses an internal counter. Each setGlobalMouseTracking(TRUE) must have a
       corresponding setGlobalMouseTracking(FALSE):

	       // at this point global mouse tracking is off
	       QApplication::setGlobalMouseTracking( TRUE );
	       QApplication::setGlobalMouseTracking( TRUE );
	       QApplication::setGlobalMouseTracking( FALSE );
	       // at this point it's still on
	       QApplication::setGlobalMouseTracking( FALSE );
	       // but now it's off

       See also hasGlobalMouseTracking() and QWidget::mouseTracking.

void QApplication::setGlobalStrut ( const QSize & strut ) [static]
       Sets the application's global strut to strut.

       The strut is a size object whose dimensions are the minimum that any GUI element that the
       user can interact with should have. For example no button should be resized to be smaller
       than the global strut size.

       The strut size should be considered when reimplementing GUI controls that may be used on
       touch-screens or similar IO-devices.

       Example:

	 QSize& WidgetClass::sizeHint() const
	 {
	     return QSize( 80, 25 ).expandedTo( QApplication::globalStrut() );
	 }

       See also globalStrut().

void QApplication::setLibraryPaths ( const QStringList & paths ) [static]
       Sets the list of directories to search when loading libraries to paths. All existing paths
       will be deleted and the path list will consist of the paths given in paths.

       See also libraryPaths(), addLibraryPath(), removeLibraryPath(), and QLibrary.

void QApplication::setMainWidget ( QWidget * mainWidget ) [virtual]
       Sets the application's main widget to mainWidget.

       In most respects the main widget is like any other widget, except that if it is closed,
       the application exits. Note that QApplication does not take ownership of the mainWidget,
       so if you create your main widget on the heap you must delete it yourself.

       You need not have a main widget; connecting lastWindowClosed() to quit() is an
       alternative.

       For X11, this function also resizes and moves the main widget according to the -geometry
       command-line option, so you should set the default geometry (using QWidget::setGeometry())
       before calling setMainWidget().

       See also mainWidget(), exec(), and quit().

       Examples:

void QApplication::setOverrideCursor ( const QCursor & cursor, bool replace = FALSE ) [static]
       Sets the application override cursor to cursor.

       Application override cursors are intended for showing the user that the application is in
       a special state, for example during an operation that might take some time.

       This cursor will be displayed in all the application's widgets until
       restoreOverrideCursor() or another setOverrideCursor() is called.

       Application cursors are stored on an internal stack. setOverrideCursor() pushes the cursor
       onto the stack, and restoreOverrideCursor() pops the active cursor off the stack. Every
       setOverrideCursor() must eventually be followed by a corresponding
       restoreOverrideCursor(), otherwise the stack will never be emptied.

       If replace is TRUE, the new cursor will replace the last override cursor (the stack keeps
       its depth). If replace is FALSE, the new stack is pushed onto the top of the stack.

       Example:

	       QApplication::setOverrideCursor( QCursor(Qt::WaitCursor) );
	       calculateHugeMandelbrot();	       // lunch time...
	       QApplication::restoreOverrideCursor();

       See also overrideCursor(), restoreOverrideCursor(), and QWidget::cursor.

       Examples:

void QApplication::setPalette ( const QPalette & palette, bool informWidgets = FALSE, const char
       * className = 0 ) [static]
       Changes the default application palette to palette. If informWidgets is TRUE, then
       existing widgets are informed about the change and may adjust themselves to the new
       application setting. If informWidgets is FALSE, the change only affects newly created
       widgets.

       If className is passed, the change applies only to widgets that inherit className (as
       reported by QObject::inherits()). If className is left 0, the change affects all widgets,
       thus overriding any previously set class specific palettes.

       The palette may be changed according to the current GUI style in QStyle::polish().

       See also QWidget::palette, palette(), and QStyle::polish().

       Examples:

void QApplication::setReverseLayout ( bool b ) [static]
       If b is TRUE, all dialogs and widgets will be laid out in a mirrored fashion, as required
       by right to left languages such as Arabic and Hebrew. If b is FALSE, dialogs and widgets
       are laid out left to right.

       Changing this flag in runtime does not cause a relayout of already instantiated widgets.

       See also reverseLayout().

void QApplication::setStartDragDistance ( int l ) [static]
       Sets the distance after which a drag should start to l pixels.

       See also startDragDistance().

void QApplication::setStartDragTime ( int ms ) [static]
       Sets the time after which a drag should start to ms ms.

       See also startDragTime().

void QApplication::setStyle ( QStyle * style ) [static]
       Sets the application's GUI style to style. Ownership of the style object is transferred to
       QApplication, so QApplication will delete the style object on application exit or when a
       new style is set.

       Example usage:

	   QApplication::setStyle( new QWindowsStyle );

       When switching application styles, the color palette is set back to the initial colors or
       the system defaults. This is necessary since certain styles have to adapt the color
       palette to be fully style-guide compliant.

       See also style(), QStyle, setPalette(), and desktopSettingsAware().

       Example: themes/themes.cpp.

QStyle * QApplication::setStyle ( const QString & style ) [static]
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Requests a QStyle object for style from the QStyleFactory.

       The string must be one of the QStyleFactory::keys(), typically one of "windows", "motif",
       "cde", "motifplus", "platinum", "sgi" and" compact". Depending on the platform,
       "windowsxp", "aqua" or" macintosh" may be available.

       A later call to the QApplication constructor will override the requested style when a
       "-style" option is passed in as a commandline parameter.

       Returns 0 if an unknown style is passed, otherwise the QStyle object returned is set as
       the application's GUI style.

void QApplication::setWheelScrollLines ( int n ) [static]
       Sets the number of lines to scroll when the mouse wheel is rotated to n.

       If this number exceeds the number of visible lines in a certain widget, the widget should
       interpret the scroll operation as a single page up / page down operation instead.

       See also wheelScrollLines().

void QApplication::setWinStyleHighlightColor ( const QColor & c ) [static]
       This function is obsolete. It is provided to keep old source working. We strongly advise
       against using it in new code.

       Sets the color used to mark selections in windows style for all widgets in the
       application. Will repaint all widgets if the color is changed.

       The default color is darkBlue.

       See also winStyleHighlightColor().

int QApplication::startDragDistance () [static]
       If you support drag and drop in you application and a drag should start after a mouse
       click and after moving the mouse a certain distance, you should use the value which this
       method returns as the distance.

       For example, if the mouse position of the click is stored in startPos and the current
       position (e.g. in the mouse move event) is currPos, you can find out if a drag should be
       started with code like this:

	 if ( ( startPos - currPos ).manhattanLength() >
	      QApplication::startDragDistance() )
	   startTheDrag();

       Qt uses this value internally, e.g. in QFileDialog.

       The default value is 4 pixels.

       See also setStartDragDistance(), startDragTime(), and QPoint::manhattanLength().

int QApplication::startDragTime () [static]
       If you support drag and drop in you application and a drag should start after a mouse
       click and after a certain time elapsed, you should use the value which this method returns
       as the delay (in ms).

       Qt also uses this delay internally, e.g. in QTextEdit and QLineEdit, for starting a drag.

       The default value is 500 ms.

       See also setStartDragTime() and startDragDistance().

bool QApplication::startingUp () [static]
       Returns TRUE if an application object has not been created yet; otherwise returns FALSE.

       See also closingDown().

QStyle &; QApplication::style () [static]
       Returns the application's style object.

       See also setStyle() and QStyle.

void QApplication::syncX () [static]
       Synchronizes with the X server in the X11 implementation. This normally takes some time.
       Does nothing on other platforms.

       See also flushX().

QWidgetList * QApplication::topLevelWidgets () [static]
       Returns a list of the top level widgets in the application.

       The list is created using new and must be deleted by the caller.

       The list is empty (QPtrList::isEmpty()) if there are no top level widgets.

       Note that some of the top level widgets may be hidden, for example the tooltip if no
       tooltip is currently shown.

       Example:

	   // Show all hidden top level widgets.
	   QWidgetList	*list = QApplication::topLevelWidgets();
	   QWidgetListIt it( *list );  // iterate over the widgets
	   QWidget * w;
	   while ( (w=it.current()) != 0 ) {   // for each top level widget...
	       ++it;
	       if ( !w->isVisible() )
		   w->show();
	   }
	   delete list; 	       // delete the list, not the widgets

       Warning: Delete the list as soon you have finished using it. The widgets in the list may
       be deleted by someone else at any time.

       See also allWidgets(), QWidget::isTopLevel, QWidget::visible, and QPtrList::isEmpty().

QString QApplication::translate ( const char * context, const char * sourceText, const char *
       comment = 0, Encoding encoding = DefaultCodec ) const
       Note: This function is reentrant when Qt is built with thread support.</p> Returns the
       translation text for sourceText, by querying the installed messages files. The message
       files are searched from the most recently installed message file back to the first
       installed message file.

       QObject::tr() and QObject::trUtf8() provide this functionality more conveniently.

       context is typically a class name (e.g., "MyDialog") and sourceText is either English text
       or a short identifying text, if the output text will be very long (as for help texts).

       comment is a disambiguating comment, for when the same sourceText is used in different
       roles within the same context. By default, it is null. encoding indicates the 8-bit
       encoding of character stings

       See the QTranslator documentation for more information about contexts and comments.

       If none of the message files contain a translation for sourceText in context, this
       function returns a QString equivalent of sourceText. The encoding of sourceText is
       specified by encoding; it defaults to DefaultCodec.

       This function is not virtual. You can use alternative translation techniques by
       subclassing QTranslator.

       Warning: This method is reentrant only if all translators are installed before calling
       this method. Installing or removing translators while performing translations is not
       supported. Doing so will most likely result in crashes or other undesirable behavior.

       See also QObject::tr(), installTranslator(), and defaultCodec().

bool QApplication::tryLock ()
       Attempts to lock the Qt Library Mutex, and returns immediately. If the lock was obtained,
       this function returns TRUE. If another thread has locked the mutex, this function returns
       FALSE, instead of waiting for the lock to become available.

       The mutex must be unlocked with unlock() before another thread can successfully lock it.

       See also lock(), unlock(), and Thread Support in Qt.

Type QApplication::type () const
       Returns the type of application, Tty, GuiClient or GuiServer.

void QApplication::unlock ( bool wakeUpGui = TRUE )
       Unlock the Qt Library Mutex. If wakeUpGui is TRUE (the default), then the GUI thread will
       be woken with QApplication::wakeUpGuiThread().

       See also lock(), locked(), and Thread Support in Qt.

void QApplication::wakeUpGuiThread ()
       Wakes up the GUI thread.

       See also guiThreadAwake() and Thread Support in Qt.

int QApplication::wheelScrollLines () [static]
       Returns the number of lines to scroll when the mouse wheel is rotated.

       See also setWheelScrollLines().

QWidget * QApplication::widgetAt ( int x, int y, bool child = FALSE ) [static]
       Returns a pointer to the widget at global screen position (x, y), or 0 if there is no Qt
       widget there.

       If child is FALSE and there is a child widget at position (x, y), the top-level widget
       containing it is returned. If child is TRUE the child widget at position (x, y) is
       returned.

       This function is normally rather slow.

       See also QCursor::pos(), QWidget::grabMouse(), and QWidget::grabKeyboard().

QWidget * QApplication::widgetAt ( const QPoint & pos, bool child = FALSE ) [static]
       This is an overloaded member function, provided for convenience. It behaves essentially
       like the above function.

       Returns a pointer to the widget at global screen position pos, or 0 if there is no Qt
       widget there.

       If child is FALSE and there is a child widget at position pos, the top-level widget
       containing it is returned. If child is TRUE the child widget at position pos is returned.

bool QApplication::winEventFilter ( MSG * ) [virtual]
       This virtual function is only implemented under Windows.

       The message procedure calls this function for every message received. Reimplement this
       function if you want to process window messages that are not processed by Qt. If you don't
       want the event to be processed by Qt, then return TRUE; otherwise return FALSE.

void QApplication::winFocus ( QWidget * widget, bool gotFocus )
       This function is available only on Windows.

       If gotFocus is TRUE, widget will become the active window. Otherwise the active window is
       reset to NULL.

const QColor &; QApplication::winStyleHighlightColor () [static]
       This function is obsolete. It is provided to keep old source working. We strongly advise
       against using it in new code.

       Returns the color used to mark selections in windows style.

       See also setWinStyleHighlightColor().

bool QApplication::x11EventFilter ( XEvent * ) [virtual]
       This virtual function is only implemented under X11.

       If you create an application that inherits QApplication and reimplement this function, you
       get direct access to all X events that the are received from the X server.

       Return TRUE if you want to stop the event from being processed. Return FALSE for normal
       event dispatching.

       See also x11ProcessEvent().

int QApplication::x11ProcessEvent ( XEvent * event )
       This function does the core processing of individual X events, normally by dispatching Qt
       events to the right destination.

       It returns 1 if the event was consumed by special handling, 0 if the event was consumed by
       normal handling, and -1 if the event was for an unrecognized widget.

       See also x11EventFilter().

RELATED FUNCTION DOCUMENTATION
void Q_ASSERT ( bool test )
       Prints a warning message containing the source code file name and line number if test is
       FALSE.

       This is really a macro defined in qglobal.h.

       Q_ASSERT is useful for testing pre- and post-conditions.

       Example:

	       //
	       // File: div.cpp
	       //
	       #include <qglobal.h>
	       int divide( int a, int b )
	       {
		   Q_ASSERT( b != 0 );		       // this is line 9
		   return a/b;
	       }

       If b is zero, the Q_ASSERT statement will output the following message using the
       qWarning() function:

	       ASSERT: "b != 0" in div.cpp(9)

       See also qWarning() and Debugging.

void Q_CHECK_PTR ( void * p )
       If p is 0, prints a warning message containing the source code file name and line number,
       saying that the program ran out of memory.

       This is really a macro defined in qglobal.h.

       Example:

	       int *a;
	       Q_CHECK_PTR( a = new int[80] );	// WRONG!
	       a = new (nothrow) int[80];	// Right
	       Q_CHECK_PTR( a );

       See also qWarning() and Debugging.

void qAddPostRoutine ( QtCleanUpFunction p )
       Adds a global routine that will be called from the QApplication destructor. This function
       is normally used to add cleanup routines for program-wide functionality.

       The function given by p should take no arguments and return nothing, like this:

	   static int *global_ptr = 0;
	   static void cleanup_ptr()
	   {
	       delete [] global_ptr;
	       global_ptr = 0;
	   }
	   void init_ptr()
	   {
	       global_ptr = new int[100];      // allocate data
	       qAddPostRoutine( cleanup_ptr ); // delete later
	   }

       Note that for an application- or module-wide cleanup, qAddPostRoutine() is often not
       suitable. People have a tendency to make such modules dynamically loaded, and then unload
       those modules long before the QApplication destructor is called, for example.

       For modules and libraries, using a reference-counted initialization manager or Qt' parent-
       child delete mechanism may be better. Here is an example of a private class which uses the
       parent-child mechanism to call a cleanup function at the right time:

	   class MyPrivateInitStuff: public QObject {
	   private:
	       MyPrivateInitStuff( QObject * parent ): QObject( parent) {
		   // initialization goes here
	       }
	       MyPrivateInitStuff * p;
	   public:
	       static MyPrivateInitStuff * initStuff( QObject * parent ) {
		   if ( !p )
		       p = new MyPrivateInitStuff( parent );
		   return p;
	       }
	       ~MyPrivateInitStuff() {
		   // cleanup (the "post routine") goes here
	       }
	   }

       By selecting the right parent widget/object, this can often be made to clean up the
       module's data at the exact right moment.

void qDebug ( const char * msg, ... )
       Prints a debug message msg, or calls the message handler (if it has been installed).

       This function takes a format string and a list of arguments, similar to the C printf()
       function.

       Example:

	       qDebug( "my window handle = %x", myWidget->id() );

       Under X11, the text is printed to stderr. Under Windows, the text is sent to the debugger.

       Warning: The internal buffer is limited to 8196 bytes (including the '&#92;0'-terminator).

       Warning: Passing (const char *)0 as argument to qDebug might lead to crashes on certain
       platforms due to the platforms printf implementation.

       See also qWarning(), qFatal(), qInstallMsgHandler(), and Debugging.

void qFatal ( const char * msg, ... )
       Prints a fatal error message msg and exits, or calls the message handler (if it has been
       installed).

       This function takes a format string and a list of arguments, similar to the C printf()
       function.

       Example:

	       int divide( int a, int b )
	       {
		   if ( b == 0 )			       // program error
		       qFatal( "divide: cannot divide by zero" );
		   return a/b;
	       }

       Under X11, the text is printed to stderr. Under Windows, the text is sent to the debugger.

       Warning: The internal buffer is limited to 8196 bytes (including the '&#92;0'-terminator).

       Warning: Passing (const char *)0 as argument to qFatal might lead to crashes on certain
       platforms due to the platforms printf implementation.

       See also qDebug(), qWarning(), qInstallMsgHandler(), and Debugging.

QtMsgHandler qInstallMsgHandler ( QtMsgHandler h )
       Installs a Qt message handler h. Returns a pointer to the message handler previously
       defined.

       The message handler is a function that prints out debug messages, warnings and fatal error
       messages. The Qt library (debug version) contains hundreds of warning messages that are
       printed when internal errors (usually invalid function arguments) occur. If you implement
       your own message handler, you get total control of these messages.

       The default message handler prints the message to the standard output under X11 or to the
       debugger under Windows. If it is a fatal message, the application aborts immediately.

       Only one message handler can be defined, since this is usually done on an application-wide
       basis to control debug output.

       To restore the message handler, call qInstallMsgHandler(0).

       Example:

	       #include <qapplication.h>
	       #include <stdio.h>
	       #include <stdlib.h>
	       void myMessageOutput( QtMsgType type, const char *msg )
	       {
		   switch ( type ) {
		       case QtDebugMsg:
			   fprintf( stderr, "Debug: %s\n", msg );
			   break;
		       case QtWarningMsg:
			   fprintf( stderr, "Warning: %s\n", msg );
			   break;
		       case QtFatalMsg:
			   fprintf( stderr, "Fatal: %s\n", msg );
			   abort();		       // deliberately core dump
		   }
	       }
	       int main( int argc, char **argv )
	       {
		   qInstallMsgHandler( myMessageOutput );
		   QApplication a( argc, argv );
		   ...
		   return a.exec();
	       }

       See also qDebug(), qWarning(), qFatal(), and Debugging.

bool qSysInfo ( int * wordSize, bool * bigEndian )
       Obtains information about the system.

       The system's word size in bits (typically 32) is returned in *wordSize. The *bigEndian is
       set to TRUE if this is a big-endian machine, or to FALSE if this is a little-endian
       machine.

       In debug mode, this function calls qFatal() with a message if the computer is truly weird
       (i.e. different endianness for 16 bit and 32 bit integers); in release mode it returns
       FALSE.

void qSystemWarning ( const char * msg, int code )
       Prints the message msg and uses code to get a system specific error message. When code is
       -1 (the default), the system's last error code will be used if possible. Use this method
       to handle failures in platform specific API calls.

       This function does nothing when Qt is built with QT_NO_DEBUG defined.

const char * qVersion ()
       Returns the Qt version number as a string, for example, "2.3.0" or" 3.0.5".

       The QT_VERSION define has the numeric value in the form: 0xmmiibb (m = major, i = minor, b
       = bugfix). For example, Qt 3.0.5's QT_VERSION is 0x030005.

void qWarning ( const char * msg, ... )
       Prints a warning message msg, or calls the message handler (if it has been installed).

       This function takes a format string and a list of arguments, similar to the C printf()
       function.

       Example:

	       void f( int c )
	       {
		   if ( c > 200 )
		       qWarning( "f: bad argument, c == %d", c );
	       }

       Under X11, the text is printed to stderr. Under Windows, the text is sent to the debugger.

       Warning: The internal buffer is limited to 8196 bytes (including the '&#92;0'-terminator).

       Warning: Passing (const char *)0 as argument to qWarning might lead to crashes on certain
       platforms due to the platforms printf implementation.

       See also qDebug(), qFatal(), qInstallMsgHandler(), and Debugging.

SEE ALSO
       http://doc.trolltech.com/qapplication.html http://www.trolltech.com/faq/tech.html

COPYRIGHT
       Copyright 1992-2007 Trolltech ASA, http://www.trolltech.com.  See the license file
       included in the distribution for a complete license statement.

AUTHOR
       Generated automatically from the source code.

BUGS
       If you find a bug in Qt, please report it as described in
       http://doc.trolltech.com/bughowto.html.	Good bug reports help us to help you. Thank you.

       The definitive Qt documentation is provided in HTML format; it is located at
       $QTDIR/doc/html and can be read using Qt Assistant or with a web browser. This man page is
       provided as a convenience for those users who prefer man pages, although this format is
       not officially supported by Trolltech.

       If you find errors in this manual page, please report them to qt-bugs@trolltech.com.
       Please include the name of the manual page (qapplication.3qt) and the Qt version (3.3.8).

Trolltech AS				 2 February 2007			QApplication(3qt)
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