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funsky(1) [centos man page]

funsky(1)							SAORD Documentation							 funsky(1)

NAME
funsky - convert between image and sky coordinates SYNOPSIS
funsky iname[ext] # RA,Dec (deg) or image pix from stdin funsky iname[ext] [lname] # RA, Dec (deg) or image pix from list funsky iname[ext] [col1] [col2] # named cols:units from stdin funsky iname[ext] [lname] [col1] [col2] # named cols:units from list OPTIONS
-d # always use integer tlmin conversion (as ds9 does) -r # convert x,y to RA,Dec (default: convert RA,Dec to x,y) -o # include offset from the nominal target position (in arcsec) -v # display input values also (default: display output only) -T # output display in rdb format (w/header,tab delimiters) DESCRIPTION
Funsky converts input sky coordinates (RA, Dec) to image coordinates (or vice versa) using the WCS information contained in the specified FITS file. Several calling sequences are supported in order to make it easy to specify coordinate positions in different ways. The first required argument is always the input FITS file (or extension) containing the WCS information in an extension header. Note that the data from this file is not used. By default, the program converts input RA and Dec values to X and Y using this WCS information. If the WCS is associated with a FITS image, then the X,Y values are image values. If the WCS is associated with a binary table, then the X, Y val- ues are physical values. To convert X,Y to RA and Dec, use the -r (reverse) switch. If no other command arguments are supplied, then the input positions are read from the standard input. Each line is assumed to contain a single coordinate position consisting of an RA in hours (or X in pixels) followed by a Dec in degrees (or Y in pixels). The usual delim- iters are supported (spaces, commas, tabs). For example: # read from stdin, default column names and units [sh] funsky snr.ev 22.982695 58.606523 # input RA (hrs), Dec(deg) 510.00 510.00 22.982127 58.607634 # input 512.00 510.50 22.981700 58.614301 # input 513.50 513.50 ^D # end of input If a second argument is supplied, this argument is assumed to be a file containing RA (X) and Dec (Y) positions. The file can either be an ASCII table or a FITS binary table. The order of columns is unimportant, if the table has a column header. In this case, the names of the columns must be one of "RA", "DEC", or "X", "Y" for sky to image and image to sky conversions, respectively. If the table has no header, then once again, RA (X) is assumed to first, followed by DEC (Y). For example: # read from file, default column names and units [sh] cat hd.in RA DEC --------- --------- 22.982695 58.606523 22.982127 58.607634 22.981700 58.614301 [sh] funsky snr.ev hd.in 510.00 510.00 512.00 510.50 513.50 513.50 If three arguments are supplied, then the input positions again are read from the standard input. Each line is assumed to contain a single coordinate position consisting of an RA (or X in pixels) followed by a Dec (or Y in pixels), with the usual delimiters supported. However, the second and third arguments now specify the column names and/or sky units using a colon-delimited syntax: [colname]:[h|d|r] If the colname is omitted, the names default to "RA", "DEC", "X", "Y", "COL1", or "COL2" as above. If the units are omitted, the default is hours for RA and degrees for Dec. When the -r switch is used (convert from image to sky) the units are applied to the output instead of the input. The following examples will serve to illustrate the options: # read from stdin, specifying column names (def. units: hours, degrees) [sh] cat hd.in MYRA MYDEC --------- --------- 22.982695 58.606523 22.982127 58.607634 22.981700 58.614301 [sh] funsky snr.ev MYRA MYDEC < hd.in 510.00 510.00 512.00 510.50 513.50 513.50 # read from stdin, specifying column names and units [sh] cat dd.in MYRA MYDEC --------- --------- 344.740432 58.606523 344.731900 58.607634 344.725500 58.614301 [sh] funsky snr.ev MYRA:d MYDEC:d < dd.in 510.00 510.00 512.00 510.50 513.50 513.50 # read stdin, convert image to sky, specifying output sky units [sh] cat im.in 510.00 510.00 512.00 510.50 513.50 513.50 [sh] cat im.in | funsky -r snr.ev :d :d 344.740432 58.606523 344.731900 58.607634 344.725500 58.614301 Finally, four command arguments specify both and input file and column names and/or units: [sh] cat dd.in MYRA MYDEC --------- --------- 344.740432 58.606523 344.731900 58.607634 344.725500 58.614301 [sh] funsky snr.ev dd.in MYRA:d MYDEC:d 510.00 510.00 512.00 510.50 513.50 513.50 # read file, convert image to sky, specifying output sky units [sh] cat im.in 510.00 510.00 512.00 510.50 513.50 513.50 [sh] funsky -r snr.ev im.in :d :d 344.740432 58.606523 344.731900 58.607634 344.725500 58.614301 By default, the output of funsky consists only of the converted coordinate position(s), one per output line. This makes parsing in shell scripts easy. Use the -v (verbose) switch to specify that the input coordinates should be pre-pended to each line. For example: [sh] cat dd.in MYRA MYDEC --------- --------- 344.740432 58.606523 344.731900 58.607634 344.725500 58.614301 [sh] funsky snr.ev dd.in MYRA:d MYDEC:d 510.00 510.00 512.00 510.50 513.50 513.50 [sh] funsky -v snr.ev dd.in MYRA:d MYDEC:d 344.740432 58.606523 510.00 510.00 344.731900 58.607634 512.00 510.50 344.725500 58.614301 513.50 513.50 In addition, a full starbase table can be output using the -T (table) switch. This switch can be used with or without the -v switch. If the -T and -v are both specified, then a descriptive header parameters are output before the table (mainly to remind you of the sky units): # output table in non-verbose mode [sh] funsky -T snr.ev dd.in MYRA:d MYDEC:d X Y ------------ ------------ 510.00 510.00 512.00 510.50 513.50 513.50 # output table in verbose mode [sh] funsky -T -v snr.ev dd.in MYRA:d MYDEC:d # IFILE = /Users/eric/data/snr.ev # ICOL1 = MYRA # ICOL2 = MYDEC # IUNITS1 = d # IUNITS2 = d # OCOL1 = X # OCOL2 = Y MYRA MYDEC X Y ------------ ------------ ------------ ------------ 344.740432 58.606523 510.00 510.00 344.731900 58.607634 512.00 510.50 344.725500 58.614301 513.50 513.50 Finally, the -d (ds9) switch mimicks ds9's use of integer TLMIN and TLMAX values for all coordinate transformations. FITS conventions seem to call for use of floating point TLMIN and TLMAX when the data are floats. This convention is followed by funsky but results in a small discrepancy with ds9's converted values for floating point data. We will remedy this conflict in the future, maybe. SEE ALSO
See funtools(7) for a list of Funtools help pages version 1.4.2 January 2, 2008 funsky(1)
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