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Test Your Knowledge in Computers #778
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Harmonic analysis is a branch of mathematics concerned with the representation of functions or signals as the superposition of basic waves.
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ntohs(3n) [bsd man page]

BYTEORDER(3N)															     BYTEORDER(3N)

NAME
htonl, htons, ntohl, ntohs - convert values between host and network byte order SYNOPSIS
#include <sys/types.h> #include <netinet/in.h> netlong = htonl(hostlong); u_long netlong, hostlong; netshort = htons(hostshort); u_short netshort, hostshort; hostlong = ntohl(netlong); u_long hostlong, netlong; hostshort = ntohs(netshort); u_short hostshort, netshort; DESCRIPTION
These routines convert 16 and 32 bit quantities between network byte order and host byte order. On machines such as the SUN these routines are defined as null macros in the include file <netinet/in.h>. These routines are most often used in conjunction with Internet addresses and ports as returned by gethostbyname(3N) and getservent(3N). SEE ALSO
gethostbyname(3N), getservent(3N) BUGS
The VAX handles bytes backwards from most everyone else in the world. This is not expected to be fixed in the near future. 4.2 Berkeley Distribution May 15, 1986 BYTEORDER(3N)

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BYTEORDER(3)						     Linux Programmer's Manual						      BYTEORDER(3)

NAME
htonl, htons, ntohl, ntohs - convert values between host and network byte order SYNOPSIS
#include <arpa/inet.h> uint32_t htonl(uint32_t hostlong); uint16_t htons(uint16_t hostshort); uint32_t ntohl(uint32_t netlong); uint16_t ntohs(uint16_t netshort); DESCRIPTION
The htonl() function converts the unsigned integer hostlong from host byte order to network byte order. The htons() function converts the unsigned short integer hostshort from host byte order to network byte order. The ntohl() function converts the unsigned integer netlong from network byte order to host byte order. The ntohs() function converts the unsigned short integer netshort from network byte order to host byte order. On the i386 the host byte order is Least Significant Byte first, whereas the network byte order, as used on the Internet, is Most Signifi- cant Byte first. CONFORMING TO
POSIX.1-2001. Some systems require the inclusion of <netinet/in.h> instead of <arpa/inet.h>. SEE ALSO
endian(3), gethostbyname(3), getservent(3) COLOPHON
This page is part of release 3.27 of the Linux man-pages project. A description of the project, and information about reporting bugs, can be found at http://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/. GNU
2009-01-15 BYTEORDER(3)

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