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touch(1) [bsd man page]

TOUCH(1)						      General Commands Manual							  TOUCH(1)

NAME
touch - update date last modified of a file SYNOPSIS
touch [ -c ] [ -f ] file ... DESCRIPTION
Touch attempts to set the modified date of each file. If a file exists, this is done by reading a character from the file and writing it back. If a file does not exist, an attempt will be made to create it unless the -c option is specified. The -f option will attempt to force the touch in spite of read and write permissions on a file. SEE ALSO
utimes(2) 7th Edition April 29, 1985 TOUCH(1)

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TOUCH(1)						    BSD General Commands Manual 						  TOUCH(1)

NAME
touch -- change file access and modification times SYNOPSIS
touch [-A [-][[hh]mm]SS] [-acfhm] [-r file] [-t [[CC]YY]MMDDhhmm[.SS]] file ... DESCRIPTION
The touch utility sets the modification and access times of files. If any file does not exist, it is created with default permissions. By default, touch changes both modification and access times. The -a and -m flags may be used to select the access time or the modification time individually. Selecting both is equivalent to the default. By default, the timestamps are set to the current time. The -t flag explicitly specifies a different time, and the -r flag specifies to set the times those of the specified file. The -A flag adjusts the val- ues by a specified amount. The following options are available: -A Adjust the access and modification time stamps for the file by the specified value. This flag is intended for use in modifying files with incorrectly set time stamps. The argument is of the form ``[-][[hh]mm]SS'' where each pair of letters represents the following: - Make the adjustment negative: the new time stamp is set to be before the old one. hh The number of hours, from 00 to 99. mm The number of minutes, from 00 to 59. SS The number of seconds, from 00 to 59. The -A flag implies the -c flag: if any file specified does not exist, it will be silently ignored. -a Change the access time of the file. The modification time of the file is not changed unless the -m flag is also specified. -c Do not create the file if it does not exist. The touch utility does not treat this as an error. No error messages are displayed and the exit value is not affected. -f Attempt to force the update, even if the file permissions do not currently permit it. -h If the file is a symbolic link, change the times of the link itself rather than the file that the link points to. Note that -h implies -c and thus will not create any new files. -m Change the modification time of the file. The access time of the file is not changed unless the -a flag is also specified. -r Use the access and modifications times from the specified file instead of the current time of day. -t Change the access and modification times to the specified time instead of the current time of day. The argument is of the form ``[[CC]YY]MMDDhhmm[.SS]'' where each pair of letters represents the following: CC The first two digits of the year (the century). YY The second two digits of the year. If ``YY'' is specified, but ``CC'' is not, a value for ``YY'' between 69 and 99 results in a ``CC'' value of 19. Otherwise, a ``CC'' value of 20 is used. MM The month of the year, from 01 to 12. DD the day of the month, from 01 to 31. hh The hour of the day, from 00 to 23. mm The minute of the hour, from 00 to 59. SS The second of the minute, from 00 to 61. If the ``CC'' and ``YY'' letter pairs are not specified, the values default to the current year. If the ``SS'' letter pair is not specified, the value defaults to 0. EXIT STATUS
The touch utility exits 0 on success, and >0 if an error occurs. COMPATIBILITY
The obsolescent form of touch, where a time format is specified as the first argument, is supported. When no -r or -t option is specified, there are at least two arguments, and the first argument is a string of digits either eight or ten characters in length, the first argument is interpreted as a time specification of the form ``MMDDhhmm[YY]''. The ``MM'', ``DD'', ``hh'' and ``mm'' letter pairs are treated as their counterparts specified to the -t option. If the ``YY'' letter pair is in the range 39 to 99, the year is set to 1939 to 1999, otherwise, the year is set in the 21st century. SEE ALSO
utimes(2) STANDARDS
The touch utility is expected to be a superset of the IEEE Std 1003.2 (``POSIX.2'') specification. HISTORY
A touch utility appeared in Version 7 AT&T UNIX. BSD
April 28, 1995 BSD

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